WeiDU Documentation

Fredrik Lindgren, a.k.a. Wisp
lindgren.fredrik@gmail.com
edited according to the GPL from source code by
Valerio Bigiani, AKA The Bigg
thebigg@spellholdstudios.net and
Westley Weimer
weimer@cs.berkley.edu

Contents

1  About WeiDU

The main home page for WeiDU is: http://weidu.org/. I encourage you to download the latest version.

WeiDU is designed to make it easier to write and distribute modifications to Infinity Engine games. It can load and modify Infinity Engine resources according to instructions you provide. WeiDU is ideal for packaging modifications that include dialogue or that want to be compatible with other modifications.

I’ll be honest with you up front: WeiDU is initially harder to use than some of its alternatives. However, most users report that (1) the alternatives are insufficient because they lack features that only WeiDU provides and (2) WeiDU grows on you over time.

You are welcome to use these utilities to make and distribute your own Infinity Engine mods. This utility is covered by the GNU General Public License, but you are also allowed to distribute an unmodified binary copy of WeiDU.EXE (without the source code) with your mod if you like.

I decided to write my own Infinity Engine DLG and TLK utilities because I was unable to get the TeamBG DLG Editor and Mass Converter to work properly. Either they wouldn’t parse the strings or they would mangle the text or they would randomly crash ... it was bad all around. Also, they were all GUIs. As a unix weenie I’m in love with command line utilities and as a PL doctoral student I love making little languages and compilers. WeiDU was originally a family of small programs with unimaginative names like DC, DD and TP. The more appealing term “WeiDU” (which rhymes with “IDU”, Eye-Dee-You) was coined by Jason Compton and Ghreyfain, noted BGII mod authors.

2  Don’t Panic!

Step-By-Step Beginner’s Guide to WeiDU:

  1. Don’t Panic. Many of you are children of the GUI era. But programs that run from the command line can be your friend, and in the long run are often much faster and, yes, easier to use.
  2. The Best Way To Learn How To Write Code In WeiDU’s D Format Is To Read Code Written In WeiDU’s D Format. Start by decompiling existing in-game DLGs that you understand and read through them. Compare how they appear in WeiDU to how they appear in other BG2 editing tools you may be more comfortable with, such as Near Infinity or Infinity Explorer.
  3. The Best Way To Learn How To Write Code In WeiDU’s D Format Is To Read Code Written In WeiDU’s D Format, Part 2. A growing number of BG2 add-on packs are being created using WeiDU. A list is available at http://www.pocketplane.net/modlist/. These can help you understand how WeiDU’s advanced features, such as dialogue appending, script and 2DA patching, and item/spell/creature patching work in a “real-world” setting. Make it a point to download some of them and understand HOW they work.
  4. Take a look at some of the examples in this document. There is a lovely WeiDU tutorial (written by Japheth) available at http://forums.pocketplane.net/index.php?topic=55.0. If you are feeling overwhelmed, start there first. It also covers installation. Ghreyfain also has a “how to create an NPC with WeiDU” tutorial at http://forums.pocketplane.net/index.php?topic=52.0.
  5. There is a WeiDU discussion board at http://forums.pocketplane.net/index.php?board=50.0. The discussion board is the best place to have your WeiDU (and mod-making) questions answered.
  6. Finally, if you are using a Mac and you want to play around with WeiDU, check out http://weidu.org/Mac.html for more information on obtaining a copy of WeiDU that works under OS X.

3  D and DLG File Concepts

This section is a gentle introduction to how Infinity Engine DLG files are structured. First, let’s use WeiDU to create SCSARLES.D and take a look at the dialogue of Sir Sarles.

You may install WeiDU.exe anywhere on your system. However, I recommend that you put it in your Baldur’s Gate 2 installation directory. However, WeiDU will use the Windows Registry to attempt to locate your BG2 game files.

To run the effect described, open up a DOS prompt window and change directories to get to your BGII directory. Then just type in the text in red at the DOS Prompt.

C:\Program Files\Black Isle\BGII - SoA\> weidu SCSARLES.DLG

This will create a text file called SCSARLES.D in the current directory. Open it up with Notepad or Microsoft Word or something. It’s just a text file that describes the game dialogue.

It will look something like:

// creator  : c:\bgate\weidu\weidu.exe
// argument : SCSARLES.DLG
// game     : C:\Program Files\Black Isle\BGII - SoA
// source   : C:\Program Files\Black Isle\BGII - SoA\data\Dialog.bif
// dialog   : C:\Program Files\Black Isle\BGII - SoA\DIALOG.TLK
// dialogF  : (none)

BEGIN ~SCSARLES~

IF ~NumTimesTalkedTo(0)~ THEN BEGIN 0 // from:
  SAY #28655 /* ~Who is it? Might I ask why you have disturbed my
    meditations? My creative muse must be gently awakened, and your
    stomping about is simply not conducive to this.~ [SARLES02] */
  IF ~~ THEN REPLY #28656 /* ~My apologies. I will leave you to your
    thinking.~ */ GOTO 1
  IF ~~ THEN REPLY #28657 /* ~I apologize, but I have come to request your
    talent on a commissioned artwork.~ */
      DO ~SetGlobal("TalkedToSarles","GLOBAL",1)~ GOTO 2
END

IF ~~ THEN BEGIN 1 // from: 0.0
  SAY #28661 /* ~Then I shall forget you were ever here. Actually, it is an
    astoundingly easy thing to do.~ */
  IF ~~ THEN DO ~SetNumTimesTalkedTo(0)~ EXIT
END
Dialogues in Infinity Engine games behave like finite state machines. If you aren’t familiar with the concept of a finite state machine, see http://whatis.techtarget.com/definition/0,,sid9_gci213052,00.html or http://www.c3.lanl.gov/mega-math/workbk/machine/mabkgd.html. Each block of the form:
  IF ~Initial Condition~ THEN BEGIN state1
    SAY ~Something~
    IF ~Reply Condition~ THEN REPLY ~Reply Text~ GOTO state2
  END
represents a state (more details below). When the player starts a conversation with an NPC, the game engine scans through all of the states in that NPC’s DLG file in a special WEIGHTed order and picks the one with a non-empty and true "Initial Condition". If no state has a non-empty and true "Initial Condition" then you get that “Bob - has nothing to say to you.” message. Don’t worry about the weighting process for now.

The speaker (in this case, Sir Sarles) then says whatever appears after SAY. The REPLY lines represent responses the PC can say back. If the "Reply Condition" is true, the player is given the option of saying the "Reply Text" and moving to another state in the dialogue (where Sarles will probably say something else).

Remember: SAY is for what the NPC says, REPLY is for what the player says back. If you think carefully, you’ll notice that all dialogue in Infinity Engine games is structed in this manner.

Conditions use the same syntax as triggers do in Infinity Engine BCS scripting. You will need to learn Infinity Engine scripting before too long. Strings are delineated by tildes or %% or "" (your choice, but WeiDU uses the tilde by default). After SAY or REPLY or JOURNAL you may give two Strings instead of one. The first is used with DIALOG.TLK, the second is used with DIALOGF.TLK (foreign language version for when the main character is female). If you do not give two Strings, the one String you gave is used for both.

You may also use raw numbers prefaced with a number sign (like #1234) to specify a strref inside DIALOG.TLK directly. This is useful when modifying existing dialogues (say, the Fate Spirit in ToB) so that you if a foreign user installs your dialogue they will retain all of the foreign versions of the strings you didn’t change or add. Normally the string reference numbers are put right after the SAY keyword and the string text is put in comments. The --text command-line option causes string text to be emitted with the string number in comments.

You may also indicate that a sound file (WAV/WAVC) should be associated with a given String by including its up-to-8-letter resource name in [brackets] after the string, as in:

  SAY ~Hello~ [HELLO]
Comments are C/C++ style: everything from // to the end of the line is a comment, as is /* everything in these star-slash things */. Comments are ignored by WeiDU. They are there for your benefit. Example:
  SAY ~Hello~ [HELLO]   // this is a comment        ... way out to here!
  IF /* this is also a comment */ ~~ THEN EXIT
Replies can also contain actions (using the DO keyword) which behave just like Infinity Engine BCS script actions. They can also add Journal entries, end the dialogue or transfer to another speaker.

Examples:

  IF ~~ THEN BEGIN 2 // from: 0.1
This line marks the beginning of state 2 in a dialogue. The comment tells you that it can be reached by the first reply transition from state 0.
  IF ~~ THEN REPLY ~My apologies. I will leave you to your thinking.~ // #28656
      GOTO 1
This REPLY can always be chosen and involves the spoken text "My apologies...". That text is string reference number 28656. If the PC chooses that reply, it transitions to state 1.

Finally, a transition may also take the form:

  COPY_TRANS filename label
During processing, COPY_TRANS will be replaced by all of the transitions from state "label" of file "filename". The copying takes place before all other D actions.

4  D Dialogue File Format

The D file format is a way of describing Infinity Engine dialogues and modifications to Infinity Engine Dialogues in a portable, easy-to-understand format. It supports foreign language translations and allows you to describe extensions to existing game dialogues without forcing you to describe their content. This allows you to write mods that work with mods written by others.

The D file format is presented here in an extended context-free grammar notation. If you are unfamiliar with CFGs, take a look http://www.wikipedia.com/wiki/Context-free_grammar, http://cs.wpi.edu/~kal/PLT/PLT2.1.2.html or http://www.cs.rochester.edu/users/faculty/nelson/courses/csc_173/grammars/cfg.html. You don’t really need to understand a CFG formally, though.

To get a real idea of how they work, use WeiDU to create JAHEIRA.D for yourself and look at it in a text editor. You can also browse the examples and test directories that come with WeiDU.

All of the syntax keywords are given in a UPPERCASE COURIER. All other keywords are symbolic. Notes:

D File  A D file is a text file that contains a number of D Actions. D Files tell WeiDU how to create and modify Infinity Engine DLG files.
isD Action list A D File is a list of D Actions. Typically the first and only one is BEGIN, which defines the content of a new dialogue. Other D Actions can be used to modify existing dialogues.
 
D Action  A D Action tells WeiDU how to create or modify Infinity Engine DLG files.
isBEGIN filename [ nonPausing ] state list BEGIN tells WeiDU that you are creating a new DLG file from scratch. Any existing DLG file with the same name will be overwritten. The new DLG file contains exactly the states in the list. If you set nonPausing to a non-zero integer, the game will not “stop time” while the conversation takes place. By default time stops during conversations.
orAPPEND [ IF_FILE_EXISTS ] filename state list END This tells WeiDU to place the given states at the end of the already-existing dialogue filename.DLG. If there is IF_FILE_EXISTS and the file doesn’t exists, this action is skipped.
orAPPEND_EARLY [ IF_FILE_EXISTS ] filename state list END Works like APPEND, but the states are added early on in the compilation timeline (just after BEGIN is processed). Thus they can be the targets for INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS and friends.
orCHAIN [ IF [ WEIGHT #weight ] stateTriggerString THEN ] [ IF_FILE_EXISTS ] entryFilename entryLabel chainText list chainEpilogue This instructs WeiDU to make a long conversation in which the PC can say nothing. This is useful when you want the NPCs to talk among themselves for a long time. It and its friends, INTERJECT and INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS can incredible time-savers when you’re writing non-trivial dialogue. See the examples for ideas. CHAIN will only append to existing dialogues. You cannot use CHAIN to create a new DLG. If the entryFilename file is missing and there is IF_FILE_EXISTS, the whole CHAIN is not compiled.
orINTERJECT entryFilename entryLabel globalVariable chainText list chainEpilogue Behaves like CHAIN except that all of the chainText is additionally guarded by the transition predicate Global("globalVariable","GLOBAL",0) and accompanied by the action SetGlobal("globalVariable","GLOBAL",1). If you pick globalVariable to be unique, this will ensure that the chainText is only ever seen once per game. This is useful for making interjections.
orINTERJECT_COPY_TRANS [ SAFE ] entryFilename entryLabel globalVariable chainText list This behaves just like INTERJECT except that the exitFilename and exitLabel are not present. Instead, whenever the dialogue would pass out of the chainText it follows a copy of the transitions that were at the state with stateLabel originally. This is convenient for making quick interjections from NPCs that do not actually change the true flow of the conversation. See the transition COPY_TRANS and the INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS tutorial for more information about this idea. If SAFE is specified, INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS will not warn about potentially unsafe uses (use this if you know it is safe).
orINTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2 [ SAFE ] entryFilename entryLabel globalVariable chainText list This works just like INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS, except that any actions taken in the transitions of the state specified by entryFilename and entryLabel are preserved and kept with the speaker associated with entryFilename (rather than being mistakenly performed by your new speaker). See the INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2 tutorial.
orINTERJECT_COPY_TRANS3 [ SAFE ] entryFilename entryLabel globalVariable chainText list This works just like INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS, except that all states in chainText get a link in the entry state, rather than only the first one. Expecting documentation.
orINTERJECT_COPY_TRANS4 [ SAFE ] entryFilename entryLabel globalVariable chainText list This is either INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS3 with INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2-style action handling, or INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2 with the extended INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS3 state creation rules, depending at how you look at it.
or EXTEND_TOP filename stateLabel list [ #positionNumber ] transition list END This instructs WeiDU to add the transitions in list to the top of the transition list for the specified states in filename.DLG (which must already exist).

If a positionNumber is given, WeiDU to insert the transitions just between already-existing transitions #positionNumber and #positionNumber+1 in the given states for the given file. The first transition is number 1.

orEXTEND_BOTTOM filename stateNumber list [ #positionNumber ] transition list END Behaves just like EXTEND_TOP but adds the transitions to the bottom of the list instead.
orADD_STATE_TRIGGER filename stateNumber stateTriggerString [ stateNumber list ] dActionWhen list This instructs WeiDU to add the stateTriggerString to all of the states with the given stateNumbers in the file filename.DLG (which must already exist). This is handy for adding extra conditions to an existing dialogue state.
orADD_TRANS_TRIGGER filename stateNumber transTriggerString [ moreStateNumbers list ] [ DO transNumber list ] dActionWhen list This instructs WeiDU to add the transTriggerString to all of the transitions in all of the states with the given stateNumbers in the file filename.DLG (which must already exist). This is often used in conjunction with EXTEND_BOTTOM to make a new branch in an existing state. Use ADD_TRANS_TRIGGER to add the negation of some predicate to all of the existing transitions, then use EXTEND_BOTTOM to add a transition with that predicate to that state. If a list of transNumbers is specified, only those transitions will have transTriggerString added to them. If such a list is not specified, every transition in every specified state will be modified. Note that the “first” transition is number 0.
orADD_TRANS_ACTION filename BEGIN stateNumber list END BEGIN transNumber list END transActionString dActionWhen list This instructs WeiDU to add the transActionString to all of the actions in all the transitions in all of the states specified by the stateNumber list and the transNumber list. You may use state labels in the stateNumber list. If the transNumber list is empty, the text added to all transitions on all listed states. Note that the BEGIN and END keywords must be present, even if you specify an empty list of transNumbers. The “first” transition is number 0. Any out-of-bounds transNumbers are silently ignored. The transActionString is prepended to any existing action text on a per-transition, per-state basis.
orREPLACE_TRANS_ACTION filename BEGIN stateNumber list END BEGIN transNumber list END oldText newText dActionWhen list This instructs WeiDU to replace all instances of oldText in newText to all of the actions in all the transitions in all of the states specified by the stateNumber list and the transNumber list. You may use state labels in the stateNumber list. If the transNumber list is empty, the text added to all transitions on all listed states. Note that the BEGIN and END keywords must be present, even if you specify an empty list of transNumbers. The “first” transition is number 0. Any out-of-bounds transNumbers are silently ignored.
orREPLACE_TRANS_TRIGGER filename BEGIN stateNumber list END BEGIN transNumber list END oldText newText dActionWhen list This instructs WeiDU to replace all instances of oldText in newText to all of the triggers in all of the transitions in all of the states specified by the stateNumber list and the transNumber list. You may use state labels in the stateNumber list. If the transNumber list is empty, the text added to all transitions on all listed states. Note that the BEGIN and END keywords must be present, even if you specify an empty list of transNumbers. The “first” transition is number 0. Any out-of-bounds transNumbers are silently ignored.
orALTER_TRANS filename BEGIN stateNumber list END BEGIN transNumber list END BEGIN changeWhat changeInto list END Fine altering of a single transition. See the ALTER_TRANS tutorial.
orREPLACE filename state list END This instructs WeiDU to load filename.DLG and replace some of its states with the new ones described in the state list. All of the states should have numeric stateLabels (e.g., "5" or "67"). A new state with label X will replace the old state number X.
orSET_WEIGHT filename stateLabel #stateWeight This instructs WeiDU to destructively change the WEIGHT of the given state in filename.DLG (which must exist). This should only be used to patch or workaround existing dialogues. Never use SET_WEIGHT if you can help it.
orREPLACE_SAY filename stateLabel sayString This instructs WeiDU to destructively change the sayString of the given state in filename.DLG (which must exist). This should only be used to patch or workaround existing dialogues. Never use REPLACE_SAY if you can help it.
orREPLACE_STATE_TRIGGER filename stateNumber stateTriggerString [ stateNumber list ] dActionWhen list This instructs WeiDU to destructively set the stateTriggerString of all of the states with the given stateNumbers in the file filename.DLG (which must already exist). It should be used with caution.
orREPLACE_TRIGGER_TEXT filename oldText newText dActionWhen list This instructs WeiDU to destructively replace every occurrence of oldText (which may be a regexp) in the stateTriggerStrings and transTriggerStrings of filename.DLG (which must exist). This should only be used to patch or workaround existing dialogues. Never use this if you can help it.
orREPLACE_TRIGGER_TEXT_REGEXP filenameRegexp oldText newText dActionWhen list Just like REPLACE_TRIGGER_TEXT but the filename is a regexp. The .DLG is implied.
orREPLACE_ACTION_TEXT filename oldText newText [ moreFilenames ] dActionWhen list This instructs WeiDU to destructively replace every occurrence of oldText (which may be a regexp) in the stateActionStrings of filename.DLG (which must exist). This should only be used to patch or workaround existing dialogues. Never use this if you can help it.
orREPLACE_ACTION_TEXT_REGEXP filenameRegexp oldText newText [ moreFilenameRegexps ] dActionWhen list Just like REPLACE_ACTION_TEXT but the filenames are regexps. The .DLG is implied, do not include it in your regexps.
orREPLACE_ACTION_TEXT_PROCESS filename oldText newText [ moreFilenames ] dActionWhen list This instructs WeiDU to destructively replace every occurrence of oldText (which may be a regexp) in the stateActionStrings of filename.DLG (which must exist) with newText. However, newText is first compiled as a BAF action list. In particular, this means that replacing with commands like:
~DisplayString(Myself,@123)~
... will do what you expect. This should only be used to patch or workaround existing dialogues. Never use this if you can help it.
orR_A_T_P_R filenameRegexp oldText newText [ moreFilenameRegexps ] dActionWhen list Just like REPLACE_ACTION_TEXT_PROCESS, but the filenames are regexps. The .DLG is implied. R_A_T_P_R is shorthand for REPLACE_ACTION_TEXT_PROCESS_REGEXP (to avoid undue scrollbars in the readme on a 1024x768 monitor).
 
dActionWhendefines when a D action (E.G. ADD_TRANS_ACTION) will be processed or not.
isIF StringThe action is processed if the element being altered/replaced/added to contains a substring matching against the String regexp.
orUNLESS StringThe action is not processed if the element being altered/replaced/added to contains a substring matching against the String regexp.
 
chainEpilogue Determines where the dialogue should flow at the end of the CHAIN.
isEND filename stateNumberTransfer to the given state in the given dialogue file.
orEXTERN filename stateNumberTransfer to the given state in the given dialogue file.
orCOPY_TRANS [ SAFE ] filename stateNumberAt the end of the CHAIN text, copy all transitions from the given state in the given file. This is useful for interjections (see INTERJECT). If SAFE is specified, CHAIN will not warn about potentially unsafe uses of COPY_TRANS (use this if you know it is safe).
orCOPY_TRANS_LATE [ SAFE ] filename stateNumberSame as above, but only copy after all the other D Actions have been applied.
orEXITAt the end of the CHAIN text, exit the dialogue.
orEND transition list Execute the given transitions after the final state in the CHAIN.
 
state In Infinity Engine games, this is the fundamental unit of dialogue.
isIF [ WEIGHT #weightNumber ] stateTriggerString [ THEN ] [ BEGIN ] stateLabel SAY sayText [ = sayText ... ] transition list END When you start conversing with a creature that uses a DLG file, the Infinity Engine searches through all of the states in that file in order of increasing WEIGHT and selects the first one it finds for which the stateTriggerString is both true and not empty. The creature then says all of the associated sayText. Finally, the transitions are evaluated in bottom-up (i.e., reverse) order. If a transition is found with a transTriggerString that evaluates to True and no replyText, that transition is immediately executed. Otherwise, all of the transitions are presented as options to the PC.

If a stateLabel is an integer it is called a stateNumber. All of the states in the DLG files that come with the original game use stateNumbers. Only D files use symbolic strings for stateLabels.

Including more than one bit of sayText here is often called Multisay.

Finally, once you are familiar with the syntax you may omit the THEN and BEGIN keywords if you like.

orAPPENDI filename state list END This is legacy syntax that behaves just like the D Action APPEND but is considered a state. Avoid it.
orCHAIN2 entryFilename entryLabel chain2Text list exitFilename exitLabel This is legacy syntax that behaves somewhat like the D Action CHAIN but is considered a state. In addition, chain2Text is slightly different from chainText. Avoid this construction.
 
sayText sayText and replyText are displayed to the user as part of a dialogue.
istextsayText and replyText are both text.
 
transition Transitions determine how dialogue flows from one state to another.
isIF transTriggerString [ THEN ] transFeature list transNext If the transTriggerString evaluates to true or is empty, this transition is viable. If it contains no replyText within its transFeature list, it is immediately taken. Otherwise, the replyText is presented as an option to the user. If the transition is taken, any actions in the transFeature list are performed and the dialogue flows to the point indicated by the transNext. transitions are evaluated in "reverse order". That is, the "bottom" or "last" response for a state is checked first. If its transTriggerString evaluates to true and it has no REPLY text, that transition is immediately taken. See SAREV25A state 1 for an example of a state with all kinds of transitions.
or+ [ transTriggerString ] + replyText transFeature list transNext This abbreviated syntax for transitions that would contain REPLY (which is by far the most common case) allows you to save yourself some time and typing. It behaves like the full form above.
orCOPY_TRANS [ SAFE ] filename stateLabel This instructs WeiDU to copy all of the transitions from the state with the given stateLabel in filename.DLG. This copying takes place before all other D Actions. For example, this is a valid transition list:
IF ~Before()~ THEN GOTO my_state
COPY_TRANS PLAYER1 33
IF ~After()~ THEN EXTERN SOLA 55
If SAFE is specified, COPY_TRANS will not warn about potentially unsafe uses (use this if you know it is safe).
orCOPY_TRANS_LATE [ SAFE ] filename stateLabel Same as COPY_TRANS, but is invoked after all other D Actions.
 
transFeature These are features or actions associated with taking a transition.
isREPLY replyText If this transition is taken, the PC says the replyText.
orDO stateActionString If this transition is taken, the stateActionString is executed.
orJOURNAL text If this transition is taken, the text is added to the PC’s journal.
orSOLVED_JOURNAL text If this transition is taken, the text is added to the “solved” section of the PC’s journal.
orUNSOLVED_JOURNAL text If this transition is taken, the text is added to the “unsolved” section of the PC’s journal.
orFLAGS integer This allows you to set the features associated with a transition directly using the binary format of DLG files.
 
transNext This determines where dialogue flows after a transition has been taken.
isGOTO stateLabel The dialogue continues at the state with label stateLabel in the same DLG file as the current state.
orEXTERN [ IF_FILE_EXISTS ] filename stateLabel The dialogue continues at the state with label stateLabel in the file filename.DLG. The whole transition is not compiled if there’s IF_FILE_EXISTS and the file filename doesn’t exist.
orEXIT The conversation ends.
or+ stateLabel This is a synonym for GOTO.
 
chainText This is a rapid shorthand for chaining together many little bits of dialogue when the PC is not saying anything.
is [ IF transTriggerString THEN ] sayText = sayText ... 
followed by [ == [ IF_FILE_EXISTS ] fileName [ IF transTriggerString THEN ] sayText = sayText ... ] The == (that’s two consecutive equal signs) marks the beginning of a new speaker (indicated by fileName). If the transTriggerString is true or if it is not present, this new speaker says all of its sayText in order. If the IF_FILE_EXISTS part is present, these lines are not compiled at all if the current file is not missing.
or followed by BRANCH transTriggerString BEGIN [ == [ IF_FILE_EXISTS ] fileName [ IF transTriggerString THEN ] sayText = sayText ... ] END As above, except that the first transTriggerString is appended to all existing dialogue units.
 
text This represents strings that are shown to the player, rather than strings that the game uses internally for predicates and actions.
isString [ [WAVEFILE] ] The given string is used for both male and female players. The optional [WAVEFILE] is the associated sound.
orString [ [WAVEFILE] ] String [ [WAVEFILE] ] The first string and sound file are used if the PC is male, the second string and sound file are used if the PC is female. This is useful mainly for international versions of Infinity Engine games.
or!integer textForced String Reference. As with text in general, but rather than being assigned a new, previously-unused DIALOG.TLK string entry (or merging with an existing one that has the same text), this text is written over DIALOG.TLK string entry #integer. Do not use this without a real reason.
orreference 
 
reference This is a subset of text.
is#integerThe string with reference number #integer from DIALOG.TLK should be used unchanged.
or@integerThe last definition of the translation string @integer given in any TRA file should be used.
or( AT "var" )The last definition of the translation string (with value defined by a variable) given in any TRA file should be used.
 
String This is how you tell WeiDU what text you want shown to the player. For international mods or international translations, you may use any encoding you like (that is, you are not restricted to 7-bit characters or Latin-1 or anything like that).
is"abcdef"A string can be any sequence of characters not including a " that is enclosed in ""s.
or~abcdef~A string can be any sequence of characters not including a ~ that is enclosed in ~~s.
or%abcdef%A string can be any sequence of characters not including a % that is enclosed in %%s. This is handy for Big5 translations, since " and ~ can be part of Big5-encoded characters.
or~~~~~abcdef~~~~~That’s five consecutive tildes on each side. A string can be any sequence of characters not including ~~~~~ that is enclosed in ~~~~~s. For example, string #8750 is ~!@#$\%^&*()_+-=[]{}\|;:'",<.>/? and can be given to WeiDU as ~~~~~~!@#$\%^&*()_+-=[]{}\|;:'",<.>/?~~~~~ (the content of the string is shown in red for clarity).
orString ^ StringString literal concatenation. The second string is appended to the first string. No whitespace is added. Thus "hello" ^ "World" is the same as "helloWorld".

5  Scripts

The Infinity Engine uses scripts in a bytecode format, known as BCS. Bytecode is not human-friendly, and the textual format BAF was derived from BCS. WeiDU includes a BAF compiler for turning BAF scripts into BCS scripts and a decompiler for the reverse transformation. The BCS format will not be documented here, but the format is described by the IESDP.

The BAF format accepted by WeiDU’s compiler is documented here in an extended context-free grammar notation.

Syntactical keywords are given in a UPPERCASE COURIER. Other keywords are symbolic, with the exception of TriggerOverride which is not symbolic and not written in uppercase. Notes:

BAF File  A BAF File is a text file that contains zero or more script blocks. BAF Files are compiled into BCS files, either by the COMPILE TP2 action or on the command line.
isscript block list  
 
script block  
isIF script trigger ... THEN script response ... END If the script trigger(s) are true, the script response(s) are evaluated.
 
script trigger  
is [ ! ] Infinity Engine trigger What constitutes an Infinity Engine trigger (trigger) varies between different versions of the Infinity Engine and will not be documented here. Refer to the right section of the IESDP. A preceding exclamation mark negates the trigger.
or [ ! ] TriggerOverride(Infinity Engine object,Infinity Engine trigger) TriggerOverride() is a form of syntactical sugar enabled by WeiDU. It does not constitute a trigger of itself, does not exist in BCS form and it is only available on versions of the Infinity Engine which implement the NextObjectTrigger() trigger. TriggerOverride() is compiled into NextObjectTrigger() and NextObjectTrigger() is decompiled into TriggerOverride(). Use of TriggerOverride() is semantically identical to use of NextObjectTrigger() but may be a syntactically preferable short-hand. An exclamation mark before TriggerOverride negates the trigger.

What constitutes an Infinity Engine object varies between different versions of the Infinity Engine and will not be documented here.

 
script response  
isRESPONSE #weight Infinity Engine action ... weight is a non-negative integer that gives the evaluation probability of the response block relative to any other response blocks in the same script block. What constitutes an Infinity Engine action (action) varies between different versions of the Infinity Engine and will not be documented here. Refer to the right section of the IESDP. Any time an Infinity Engine String Reference (strref) is expected by an action, you can use text. When the script is compiled, WeiDU will add the text as a string and insert the corresponding strref in its stead.

6  Command Line Options

WeiDU is a command-line utility. GUIs are available, but this document only describes command-line invocation. Use the DOS Shell ("command" or "cmd") to run WeiDU. You control its behavior by passing arguments to it on the command line.

You invoke WeiDU by typing WeiDU and then any number of options and files, as described below.

Note: since it may not be obvious, if an option accepts ’X’ and says to be cumulative, if you want to apply it multiple times you have to use the following hideousness:

weidu --string 1 --string 2 --string 3

This does not apply to *-rest commands like --biff-get-rest and --force-install-rest.

Moreover, *-rest commands must be the last, EG

weidu --biff-get-rest sw1h01.itm --out foo

will try to extract sw1h01.itm, --out and foo from the biffs; you have to express the above as

weidu --out foo --biff-get-rest sw1h01.itm

*-list commands work like the -rest variants, except that they stop parsing for the current switch once they find an option starting with ’-’. Basically, this works like you’d expect:

weidu --biff-get-list sw1h01.itm --out foo
Compiling And Decompiling
FILE.DCompile FILE to a DLG (dialogue file).
FILE.DLGDecompile FILE to a D (dialogue text file).
numberWhen decompiling a DLG file to a D file, emit only state number. You may specify this multiple times and only the states you specify will be emitted.
numberA-numberBWhen decompiling a DLG file to a D file, emit only states between numberA and numberB (inclusive). You may specify this multiple times and only the states you specify will be emitted.
FILE.BAFCompile FILE to a BCS (script file).
FILE.BCSDecompile FILE to a BAF (script text file).
--script-style XUse the given BAF/BCS scripting style. X must be BG or BG1 or BG2 or PST or IWD or IWD1 or IWD2.
--transin XUse FILE as a source of translation strings when processing D and BAF files.
FILE.TRAEquivalent to --transin FILE.TRA.
 
Module Packaging Input And Control
FILE.TP or FILE.TP2Read FILE and ask the user whether to install, reinstall or uninstall its TP2 Components.
--yesAnswer all TP2 questions with ’Yes’ and do not prompt for a key to be pressed at the end of TP2 processing.
--uninstall Answer all TP2 questions with ’Uninstall’ and do not prompt for a key to be pressed at the end of TP2 processing.
--reinstall Re-install all TP2 components that are already installed and do not prompt for a key to be pressed at the end of TP2 processing.
--language XSets the TP2 Language to the one passed here. Has no effect if the value is bigger than the language count (I.E. you’ll get asked for the language, unless you gave --uninstall, --reinstall or --force-uninstall).
--force-install Xinstalls component number X, skips the others (cumulative).
--force-uninstall Xuninstalls component number X, skips the others (cumulative). If there is no --force-install, you don’t get asked for the language.
--force-install-rest X Y...installs component number X Y..., skips the others (cumulative).
--force-uninstall-rest X Y...uninstalls component number X Y..., skips the others (cumulative).
--force-install-list X Y...installs component number X Y..., skips the others (cumulative).
--force-uninstall-list X Y...uninstalls component number X Y..., skips the others (cumulative).
--quick-menu Xinstalls the QUICK_MENU selection X. Can be combined with --force-install and friends, but only if the latter components are defined in ALWAYS_ASK.
--skip-at-viewAT_*  VIEW this  actions (and the extra chromosome versions like  NOTEPAD this ) aren’t processed, while still processing batch files and similia.
--safe-exitSave weidu.log every time a component installation is begun. This makes it impossible to uninstall components (don’t ask), but allows the user to kill the weidu process (E.G. closing the DOS console via the X button) without leaving the game in an unrecoverably inconsistent state (you can [R]e or [U]ninstall the component and the game will be consistent again). This might break with mods using overly complicated AT_* actions (basically don’t use this with Big Mods).
--save-components-nameReprints weidu.log. Useful if you install with --quick-log.
--ask-everyBehave as if ASK_EVERY_COMPONENT were present for all TP2 components.
--continueContinue TP2 processing despite TP2 Action errors.
--args XX will be stored in the tp2 variable %argv[n]%, where n is 0 for the first argument, 1 for the second, etc.

If the installation is non-interactive, said variables will be loaded from the last interactive session.

--args-rest X Y...X Y Z will be stored in the tp2 variables %argv[n]%, where n is 0 for the first argument, 1 for the second, etc.

If the installation is non-interactive, said variables will be loaded from the last interactive session.

--args-list X Y...X Y Z will be stored in the tp2 variables %argv[n]%, where n is 0 for the first argument, 1 for the second, etc.

If the installation is non-interactive, said variables will be loaded from the last interactive session.

--debug-assignPrint out all values assigned to TP2 variables (even implicit ones created by WeiDU).
--debug-valuePrint out all values encountered in TP2 processing and the results they evaluate to. Among other things, this is useful for catching parenthesis errors in your values.
--modder [ X Y ] list enables the MODDER mode and sets the MODDER option X to Y (cumulative, -list syntax).
--clear-memorycalls CLEAR_MEMORY after every TP2 action.
Automatic Updating Options
--update-allAuto-update all WeiDU setup files (e.g., Setup-MyMod.exe) in the current directory.
--noautoupdateIf you are running WeiDU as Setup-MyMod.exe, do not attempt to update yourself or any other mod.
--no-auto-tp2Do not run setup-mymod.tp2 even if WeiDU is running as setup-mymod.exe.
--noselfupdatemsgIf you are running WeiDU as Setup-MyMod.exe and it automatically updates itself, do not display a message or ask the user to press return.
 
Infinity Engine Game Location Options
--game X Set main game directory to X. WeiDU looks for CHITIN.KEY and DIALOG.TLK and the override directory in the main game directory (but see --tlkin and --search). WeiDU will look in the current directory and use the registry to find your game. If this fails, you will need to run WeiDU using the --game switch to define the full path to the BG2 directory. WeiDU will also search for BG1, IWD and PST.
--nogameDo not load any default game files. Unless you also specified --tlkin, no DIALOG.TLK will be loaded. Unless you also specified --search, no override directory will be used.
--game-by-type Xtries to guess the game path by reading the registry; X can be one of BG1, BG2, PST, IWD1 or IWD2. BGEE is unsupported.
--search X Look in X for input files (cumulative). X is treated as an override directory and is given priority over the default override directory.
 
Game Text (TLK) File Input
--use-lang XOn multi-language games (e.g., BGEE), use the files in lang/X/ instead of asking which lang/X/ to use. This answer is saved and --use-lang can override a previously saved answer.
--tlkin XUse X as DIALOG.TLK (instead of looking for DIALOG.TLK in the game directory).
--ftlkin XUse X as DIALOGF.TLK (instead of looking for DIALOGF.TLK in the game directory).
FILE.TLKEquivalent to --tlkin X.
--tlkmerge X Merge strings from X over the strings from any other loaded DIALOG.TLK.
 
General Output Options
--out X Emit most output files generated by command-line options (e.g., D, DLG, kits, --biff-get, BAF, BCS, --automate, --traify-tlk, --extract-kits, --list-biff, --cmp-from, --dcmp-from, etc.) to file X. If X is a directory, certain commands (e.g., D, DLG, --biff-get, etc.) will place their output there. Does not affect TP2 processing.
--append XLike --out, but if X is an existing file then the result will be appended to it instead of overwriting it.
--backup X Backup files to directory X before overwriting. Does not affect TP2 processing.
--tlkout XRedirect the output dialog to X. If any strings were added to or changed in the loaded DIALOG.TLK, emit X as an updated version that reflects those changes. Many operations (e.g., compiling D files, --tlkmerge, STRING_SET) can add to or modify DIALOG.TLK. If this option is not provided, the output dialog is the same as the input dialog.
--ftlkout XRedirect the output dialogf to X. If any strings were added to or changed in the loaded DIALOGF.TLK, emit X as an updated version that reflects those changes. If this options is not provided, the output dialogf is the same as the input dialogf.
--versionPrint version number and exit.
 
Dialogue Text File (D) Options
--noheader Do not emit D header comments.
--nofrom Do not emit D // from: comments.
--full-fromGenerate complete // from: comments with a slower two-pass process.
--nocomDo not emit ANY D or BAF comments.
--textEmit string text with string references in comments.
--transitiveFollow EXTERN links when making D files. See the tutorial on --transitive.
--toplevelEmit only top-level dialogue states -- that is, states with non-empty triggers.
 
Translation Options
--traify XConvert X (which should be a D or TP2 or BAF) so that it uses translation references instead of literal strings. Use --out Y to specify a name for the transformed version of X and its new TRA file.
--traify# X Use with --traify and --traify-tlk. Start the newly-created TRA file at translation string @X instead of @0.
--traify-old-tra XAssumes file X to contain strings already in .tra format. Use this over --traify# for merging new strings in an already traified D or TP2 or BAF file.
--untraify-d Xconvert .D file X to use hardcoded strings...
--untraify-tra X...from TRA file X. Please note that the outcoming file could not work properly (if baf code embedded in a d file contains @ references, or if a string contains the~ character).
--transEmit coupled D and TRA files when decompiling a DLG.
--transref Emit string reference numbers in TRA files when using --trans.
--traify-tlkEmit a TRA file for the loaded TLK file (see --tlkin, --out, --min and --traify#).
--make-tlk XCreate a TLK file from TRA file X (cumulative, see --tlkout).
--testtrans Test all specified TRA translation files to see if any of them use text that is already in the loaded DIALOG.TLK. If they do you can save translation effort by using string references instead.
--forceify XConvert the given D file to use forced strrefs (see --out, SAY, Forced String Reference).
 
Game Text Repository (TLK) Options
--string X Display string reference #X (cumulative). If you also specify --min or --max, all string references between --min (or 0) and --max (or infinity) will be displayed.
--strfind X Display strings that contain X (cumulative, regexp allowed).
--strapp X Append string X to DIALOG.TLK (cumulative).
 
Game Archive (BIFF) Options
--list-biffs Enumerate all BIFF files in CHITIN.KEY.
--list-files Enumerate all resource files in CHITIN.KEY
--biff XEnumerate contents of BIFF file X (cumulative).
--biff-get X Extract resource X from game BIFFs (cumulative, regexp allowed).
--biff-get-rest X Y ...Every argument given on the command line after --biff-get-rest is treated as if it were preceded by --biff-get. Use this command to extract multiple different files (or regexps) at once.
--biff-get-list X Y ...Every argument given on the command line after --biff-get-rest is treated as if it were preceded by --biff-get, with the -list exception. Use this command to extract multiple different files (or regexps) at once.
--biff-str X Search all game BIFFs for files containing X (regexp allowed).
--biff-value XSearch all game BIFFs for files containing value X at offset ADDR. Must be used with --biff-value-at.
--biff-value-at ADDRGives the offset address for a --biff-value search.
--biff-type X Limit --biff-str or --biff-value searches to resources of type X (cumulative).
--biff-name X When a --biff-str or --biff-value search finds a matching file, assume it has a strref name at offset X and print that name out as well.
--make-biff XCreate data/X.bif from all files in folder X and destructively update CHITIN.KEY. Do not use this feature. Use MAKE_BIFF instead.
--remove-biff XRemove references to BIFF X and all of its resources from CHITIN.KEY. Do not use this feature.
 
Comparison Options (see --out)
--cmp-from X Emit WRITE_BYTEs to turn this file ...
--cmp-to X ... into this one.
--dcmp-fromX Emit REPLACEs to turn this DLG file ...
--dcmp-to X ... into this one.
--tcmp-fromX Compare this TRA file (or directory of TRA files)...
--tcmp-to X ... with this one (or this directory).
--tlkcmp-fromX Emit STRING_SETs to convert this TLK file ...
--tlkcmp-toX ... into this one.
--tlkcmp-use-stringsWhen using --tlkcmp-from, emit commands of the form STRING_SET "Hello" @1 instead of STRING_SET #1 @1.
--bcmp-from XEmit APPLY_BCS_PATCH to turn this BCS file ...
--bcmp-to X... into this one.
--bcmp-orig XOriginal file X to apply ...
--bcmp-patch X... this patch to.
 
Range Options
--min XLower range for some commands. See --traify-tlk, --tlkcmp-from and --string.
--max XUpper range for some commands.
 
Automatic Module Packaging Options
--automate XAutomatically create a TP2 file for resources in folder X. See --out.
--automate-min XOnly --automate string references above X. If not specified, it is assumed as 62169 (that is, the number of strings in unmodded SoA).
--extract-kits XExtract all kits starting with kit #X and create TP2 actions to install those kits as part of a module.
 
Logging Options
--log X Log output and details to X.
--autolog Log output and details to WSETUP.DEBUG.
--logapp Append to log file instead of overwriting it.

Finally, note that WeiDU will not add duplicate strings to DIALOG.TLK. If you instruct WeiDU to make use of the string “Imoen” (via SAY or --strapp or whatever) it will re-use any existing definition of “Imoen” instead. Two strings are equivalent in this sense only if they have the same text and the same associated sounds (normally strings have no associated sounds).

7  Example Uses

8  WeiDU Tutorials

This section includes tutorials on specific parts of WeiDU. Many of them were contributed by users like you.

8.1  Multisay

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Jason Compton.

Although a single SAY line can be of any length, for style purposes (particularly in BG2) it is considered good form to break up very large lines into smaller chunks.

One can easily create a series of simple SAY blocks, one doing GOTO to the next, but if there are no special conditions being checked or actions being taken, you can very easily string several lines together.

Let’s say you have a scenery NPC teaching a lesson about the Bill of Rights to the US Constitution.

BEGIN TEACHER

IF ~NumTimesTalkedTo(0)~ THEN BEGIN constitution_1
  SAY ~On September 25, 1789, the First Congress of the United States
    therefore proposed to the state legislatures 12 amendments to the
    Constitution that met arguments most frequently advanced against it. The
    first two proposed amendments, which concerned the number of constituents
    for each Representative and the compensation of Congressmen, were not
    ratified. Articles 3 to 12, however, ratified by three- fourths of the
    state legislatures, constitute the first 10 amendments of the
    Constitution, known as the Bill of Rights.~
  IF ~~ THEN EXIT
END 
This is a perfectly valid block of dialogue, but it is extremely long, and would likely scroll out of the text window for players with lower resolution.

Rather than break each sentence up into a new explicit state, we can use Multisay and save a lot of typing. Multisay is invoked with the = (equals) sign, which tells WeiDU that, "the current speaker should say another line here."

Here’s how that D state would look with Multisay:

IF ~NumTimesTalkedTo(0)~ THEN BEGIN constitution_1
  SAY ~On September 25, 1789, the First Congress of the United States
  therefore proposed to the state legislatures 12 amendments to the
  Constitution that met arguments most frequently advanced against it.~
      =
  ~The first two proposed amendments, which concerned the number of
  constituents for each Representative and the compensation of Congressmen,
  were not ratified.~
      =
  ~Articles 3 to 12, however, ratified by three-fourths of the state
  legislatures, constitute the first 10 amendments of the Constitution,
  known as the Bill of Rights.~
  IF ~~ THEN EXIT
END
This will create three dialogue states, separated by simple "click to continue" transitions.

And that’s Multisay in a nutshell. Note that (as always with WeiDU) the line break and spacing before and after the = are totally optional, and used here only for illustration.

SAY ~One~ = ~Two~ = ~Three~ 
is perfectly valid as well.

You may Multisay inside almost any state, so you may use it within an APPEND D Action. This is valid:

APPEND J#KLSYJ
  IF ~~ THEN BEGIN Renal1_1
    SAY ~All right, CHARNAME. I can accept that... you are right, there
    are bigger issues to consider.~
      =
    ~But I hope you do understand why I said something, why it would be
    upsetting to have someone so close to me, in a role like that.~
    IF ~~ THEN EXIT
  END                            // end of state Renal1_1
END                             // end of APPEND J#KLSYJ
However, you cannot use Multisay inside REPLACE, because the nature of REPLACE is to change (that is, replace) a single state, while Multisay’s nature is to create multiple states.

8.2  CHAIN

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Jason Compton.

CHAIN is an extension of the Multisay concept, simply with multiple participants. If you have two NPCs bantering back and forth for a prolonged period of time, and you do not need to do any special condition checks or actions as they babble, it can get very tedious to set up a separate IF/THEN/BEGIN/SAY block for each line.

Imagine a conversation like this:

If you wanted to add this witty little banter to your game, you could do it with 11 APPEND blocks for each line, or save a little time doubling up the back-to-back Imoen and Kelsey lines with Multisay inside their APPENDs, so you’d only need 9. In fact, you could get away with 2 APPEND blocks (remember that the states don’t have to appear in the order they are spoken, so you could mention all of Kelsey’s lines first and then all of Immy’s as long as the labels thread up the conversation correctly), one with 5 state declarations and one 4. But there’s an even better way, and that’s to use CHAIN. It works very much like Multisay. You use = to indicate that the current speaker should speak again, and == (that’s two consecutive equal signs) to indicate that a new speaker should take over.

Note that as of WeiDU 82, CHAIN can now define state triggers, perform DO actions, and end with an EXIT or COPY_TRANS. This means that for most simple NPC/NPC banters, where the PC does not have an opportunity to speak, you no longer need to use anything else.

Watch and see how this dialogue works using a CHAIN.

CHAIN
  IF ~Global("KelseyImoenPizza","LOCALS",0)
      InParty("Imoen2")
      See("Imoen2")
      !StateCheck("Imoen2",STATE_SLEEPING)~ THEN BJKLSY pizzachain
  ~Imoen, what do you like on your pizza?~
DO ~SetGlobal("KelseyImoenPizza","LOCALS",1)~
  == IMOEN2J
  ~Oregano.~
  =
  ~Oh, and maybe with a little basil mixed in.~
  == BJKLSY
  ~Well, yeah, but anything else?~
  == IMOEN2J
  ~Sauce is good.~
  == BJKLSY
  ~(laughs) You're not being very helpful, Imoen.~
  == IMOEN2J
  ~Crust. I like crust on my pizza. Cooked crust is better.~
  == BJKLSY
  ~Do you want me to make you this pizza or not?~
  =
  ~It WAS your idea.~
  == IMOEN2J
  ~I can't decide. Never mind, I'm just gonna have yogurt.~
  == BJKLSY
  ~(sigh)~
EXIT 
Note how this dialogue works.

We use the CHAIN statement to define the state trigger (the starting conditions that must be true) and assign it to BJKLSY.DLG. The "pizzachain" label is mostly just for internal reference. Kelsey delivers the first line, then we use == IMOEN2J to allow her to answer, "Oregano." Then, we can use the single = to indicate that the current speaker (Imoen) has two consecutive lines.

Then it’s Kelsey’s turn to speak, so we use == BJKLSY to tell WeiDU to tell WeiDU to switch to the other speaker (which is Kelsey, since we specified BJKLSY). They banter back and forth for a while, and then when it is Kelsey’s turn to have back-to-back lines Do you want me to make you this pizza or not? and It WAS your idea., we separate with a single = to indicate that the current speaker (Kelsey) has two consecutive lines.

After Kelsey’s final, exasperated sigh, we use the EXIT command to terminate the CHAIN, and exit the dialogue.

And that’s all you need to know to use CHAIN. It saves a tremendous amount of time over setting up individual APPEND blocks, even Multisay blocks, for each NPC.

Advanced CHAINing:

You may include DO actions and conditionals inside chainText, as in:

CHAIN
  IF ~Global("KelseyImoenPizza","LOCALS",0)
      InParty("Imoen2")
      See("Imoen2")
      !StateCheck("Imoen2",STATE_SLEEPING)~ THEN BJKLSY pizzachain
  ~Imoen, what do you like on your pizza?~
DO ~SetGlobal("KelseyImoenPizza","LOCALS",1)~
  == IMOEN2J
    ~Oregano.~
    =
    ~Oh, and maybe with a little basil mixed in.~

  == BJKLSY
    ~Well, yeah, but anything else?~

  == IMOEN2J
    ~Sauce is good.~

    == BJKLSY   IF ~PartyHasItem("pepperoni")~ THEN
      ~Look, we HAVE pepperoni. Why don't I just use that? I'll eat it,
      anyway. If you don't like it, have yogurt instead.~

    == IMOEN2J  IF ~!PartyHasItem("pepperoni")~ THEN
      ~Crust. I like crust on my pizza. Cooked crust is better.~
    == BJKLSY IF ~!PartyHasItem("pepperoni")~ THEN
      ~Do you want me to make you this pizza or not?~
      =
      ~It WAS your idea.~

    == IMOEN2J  IF ~!PartyHasItem("pepperoni")~ THEN
      ~I can't decide. Never mind, I'm just gonna have yogurt.~
    == BJKLSY IF ~!PartyHasItem("pepperoni")~ THEN
      ~(sigh)~
EXIT
In this case, the dialogue changes if the party has the pepperoni item. If it does, Kelsey says the we HAVE pepperoni and then (sigh) and then the dialogue ends. If not, the dialogue works as before. The chainText lines with IFs in them are only spoken if their conditionals are true.

8.3  COPY_TRANS

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Jason Compton.

There are some complex branching dialogues in Infinity Engine games that you, as a mod creator, may wish to add to. Consider Baldur’s Gate 2 and the "Arrival In Hell" dialogue. There is a brief internal dialogue as the protagonist comes to terms with the fact that he/she is now in Hell, and then all of the companions coded by Bioware have a chance to speak. (PLAYER1.DLG state 25. It will help the rest of this explanation if you go use WeiDU to decompile PLAYER1.DLG into PLAYER1.d, and/or open up PLAYER1.DLG in Near Infinity and look at state 25.)

After the PC’s internal voice says You doubt they will be pleased with their present circumstance, when you don’t even know why you are here yourself., every Bioware NPC has the opportunity to speak. If you are creating a new NPC and want it to have that full, rich Bioware flavor, you may wish to let your character speak here as well. For that, a simple EXTEND_BOTTOM will do the job.

Here’s the example of how Weimer does this with Solaufein:

EXTEND_BOTTOM PLAYER1 25
  IF ~IsValidForPartyDialogue("Sola")
      Global("SolaWelcomeHell","GLOBAL",0)~ THEN
    DO ~SetGlobal("SolaWelcomeHell","GLOBAL",1)~ EXTERN SOLA inHell1
END
This puts a new transition at the bottom of PLAYER1 25 that tells the game to branch to Solaufein’s observation about your arrival in Hell, if he is present (IsValid) and if we have not already seen his comment once before (the check for SolaWelcomeHell=0, then setting it to 1. This ensures that this path can only happen once, which is important for a reason I will explain later.) SOLA inHell1, which we will define later, contains Solaufein’s comment.

Once Solaufein makes his comment, it would be very thoughtful of us to allow the other Bioware NPCs to have their say as well, as Bioware intended and as the experienced players out there expect. You could simply use the decompiled PLAYER1.D and copy and paste the transition list out. But there are some good reasons not to do that. On a trivial level, it’s a big waste of space in your D file.

The most important reason is this: If another mod NPC has come along and done their own EXTEND_BOTTOM, you would have no way of knowing that. By putting the Bioware stock transition list in, you would ensure that only your mod NPC got to have their say. The rest would be silent. So if you were the developer of Solaufein, and Solaufein were installed after Kelsey and Tashia in a game, Kelsey and Tashia would be skipped, because you only copied the Bioware transition list. That’s a heavy responsibility.

That’s why COPY_TRANS exists. COPY_TRANS pulls the entire transition list from a specified state and makes it the transition list for your new state.

To illustrate, look at SOLA inHell1 :

APPEND SOLA
  IF ~~ THEN BEGIN inHell1
    SAY @2 = @3         // use strings @2 and @3 from translation file
    COPY_TRANS PLAYER1 25
  END
END 
Instead of copying and pasting that huge list of IF "" THEN EXTERN transitions from the PLAYER1.D, we let WeiDU do it for us. COPY_TRANS PLAYER1 25 tells WeiDU to grab the current list of transitions from PLAYER1 state 25, and use it as the transition list for SOLA inHell1. This ensures that Solaufein will be able to properly branch out to Imoen, Aerie, Minsc, and the rest of the gang, as well as grabbing the transitions that may have been added by other NPCs such as Kelsey, Valen, or Tashia.

COPY_TRANS can form all of your new state’s transition list, or only part of it. This would be valid, for example:

IF ~~ THEN BEGIN commentary
  SAY ~Hey, I think I might like to run the transition list from TOLGER
    75... or I might want to do something else, if I'm in chapter six!~
  COPY_TRANS TOLGER 75
  IF ~Global("Chapter","GLOBAL",6)~ THEN GOTO chapter6commentary
END
This would make the GOTO commentary2 transition show up at the bottom of the transition stack (below the list copied from TOLGER 75). Remember that transition triggers are read bottom to top, so it would be the first transition evaluated. If you want it to be evaluated after the list of transitions in the COPY_TRANS, put it above. Note, however, that Bioware usually structures its transition lists so that the topmost trigger will always be true (in fact, sometimes it is "True()") so it is somewhat unlikely you would ever want to put a new transition trigger above the COPY_TRANS.

Now, that explanation for why the SolaWelcomeHell variable check is important: if a user accidentally installs the same mod more than once, and it employs COPY_TRANS, the list the second time around will include our new trigger:

IF ~IsValidForPartyDialogue("Sola")
      Global("SolaWelcomeHell","GLOBAL",0)~ THEN
    DO ~SetGlobal("SolaWelcomeHell","GLOBAL",1)~ EXTERN SOLA inHell1
If there was no flag being set to ensure that the transition could only run once, the user would get stuck in a loop. This can and has happened with mods in the wild. The end result would be Solaufein or Kelsey or whomever constantly offering their commentary, over and over again.

Important note: The WeiDU D compiler runs COPY_TRANS before other actions that you might take to affect a transition list within the same D file (like EXTEND_TOP and EXTEND_BOTTOM). This is a good thing.

8.4  INTERJECT

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Jason Compton.

Interjections, the little comments party members make, are a great way to spice up a new NPC or a new quest you create. It shows that the characters are paying attention to their game world, and that they have an opinion about what goes on around them.

Through interjections, an NPC can advise a course of action, complain about a decision, force your hand... fun things.

The traditional way to do an interjection is to find a state of a dialogue where another NPC might comment, and use EXTEND_BOTTOM and APPEND in conjunction.

Here’s an old-school example:

EXTEND_BOTTOM SAHPR4 7
     IF ~IsValidForPartyDialog("J#Kelsey")~ THEN EXTERN J#KLSYJ KelseySAHPR4
END

APPEND J#KLSYJ
  IF ~~ THEN BEGIN KelseySAHPR4
    SAY ~Urk. Who was the lucky donor?~
    IF ~~ THEN EXTERN SAHPR2 10
  END
END
This works, but it’s also more work than it needs to be since the introduction of INTERJECT. (Incidentally, for you WeiDU historians out there, there are two main reasons advanced functions have been added to WeiDU since the first versions of Solaufein and the original CHAIN command: Either Weimer needed them for his own modding goals, or a mod project, usually Kelsey, requested it. INTERJECT came about when Westley finally decided that Solaufein and Valen should comment about quests. On the other hand, COPY_TRANS and INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS were my idea.)

INTERJECT simplifies this process considerably. To run an INTERJECT, you need to know the source state (the line after which you want one or more NPCs to interject), and the destination state (where you want the dialogue tree to go after the interjection.) Typically, but not necessarily, the destination state will be wherever the dialogue was originally planning to go, but if the NPC takes the conversation in a new direction, that may change. We’ll stick with the simpler cases for illustration.

INTERJECT is a specialized form of CHAIN. So if you’re familiar with CHAIN, this will look familiar.

Consider the dryads in the Irenicus start dungeon. Perhaps Minsc should say something to them. IDRYAD1.DLG state 1 offers a good opportunity.

IF ~~ THEN BEGIN 1 // from:
  SAY #11080 /* ~We are his possessions.~ */
  IF ~~ THEN EXTERN ~IDRYAD2~ 1
END
Minsc is outraged. Here’s how he can express it. The idea is that we want Minsc to comment, but for the dialogue to continue just as it would have if he was not there.
INTERJECT IDRYAD1 1 MinscDryad
  == MINSCJ IF ~IsValidForPartyDialog("Minsc")~ THEN
    ~Boo is outraged that the strange wizard would own these lovely ladies!
    Can Minsc and Boo help you nice girls?~
END IDRYAD2 1
Here’s what’s going on here.

Invoking INTERJECT requires three arguments: the dialogue name and state we’re interjecting into, plus a unique global variable name. This variable will be set from 0 to 1 after the INTERJECT runs, to ensure that it can only happen once. (This is important in case players accidentally install your mod twice, as it could create a looping problem similar to the one described in COPY_TRANS.)

So INTERJECT IDRYAD1 1 MinscDryad tells WeiDU "Put this dialogue after IDRYAD1 state 1. This dialogue will run if MinscDryad is 0. After it runs, we will set MinscDryad to 1."

Then we need to define who is speaking. == (that’s two consecutive equal signs) is CHAIN-style notation for a new speaker, and MINSCJ is the proper dialogue to use for Minsc’s "joined-party" commentary. If Minsc is in the party and valid for dialogue, he will say his line. After that, we transition to IDRYAD2 state 1 (END IDRYAD2 1), which is where the dialogue was heading in the first place. We can make this more complicated and let the dryad reply to his interruption before proceeding.

INTERJECT IDRYAD1 1 MinscDryad
  == MINSCJ     IF ~IsValidForPartyDialog("Minsc")~ THEN
    ~Boo is outraged that the strange wizard would own these lovely ladies!
    Can Minsc and Boo help you nice girls?~
  == IDRYAD1    IF ~IsValidForPartyDialog("Minsc")~ THEN
    ~Large mortal, we are having a dramatic scene. Please do not
    interrupt.~
END IDRYAD2 1
Note that we repeat the
IF ~IsValidForPartyDialog("Minsc")~ THEN
check for IDRYAD1. That is to ensure that she only says that line if Minsc is there, and by extension has already made his little comment. So now, Minsc interrupts, Dryad #1 scolds him, and then we proceed to the second dryad’s line.

One general piece of advice: while it’s not necessary to pick a state that has only a single transition to another state, unless you’re willing to experiment (or you’re intentionally trying to remove player choices from the equation, by making the NPC say something that forces immediate action, for instance), don’t INTERJECT into a state that has player options (REPLYs).

8.5  INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Jason Compton.

INTERJECT is good for creating interjections where none already exist. However, many of the really good opportunities for interjections in game dialogue already have interjections in them. If you use standard INTERJECT, chances are you’ll skip right over them.

Consider TOLGER.DLG state 75. After Tolgerias lays down the law by saying This is a sensitive matter, and I cannot tell all to every curious soul. I must have your commitment that you agree to the task, four NPCs (Edwin, Jaheira, Yoshimo, Korgan) will tell you what they think of that rotten arrangement. What’s more, Bioware structured the dialogue transitions so that they all can get their comment in, if all four of them are in the party.

However, using a standard INTERJECT for a new NPC line would skip over those four comments, which is rather impolite. INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS works much like regular INTERJECT, but instead of defining a state to transition to after END, WeiDU will COPY_TRANS the transition list from the state you are INTERJECTing into.

This is not as confusing as it sounds. Watch as hypothetical new NPC Aqualung responds to Tolgerias’s terms:

INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS TOLGER 75 AquaTolger
  == AQUALUNJ   IF ~IsValidForPartyDialogue("Aqualung")~ THEN
    ~Hey, that's a really crummy offer! Where did those little girls go? I
    could be sitting on a park bench, I don't need this aggravation! Who
    are you, anyway?~
  == TOLGER     IF ~IsValidForPartyDialogue("Aqualung")~ THEN
    ~You poor old sod, you see it's only me. Now, did anyone else have a
    smart remark they wanted to make?~
END
So, if Aqualung is around, we’ll hear from him and then Tolgerias will respond to him. After that, the game will look for the presence of Edwin, Jaheira, Yoshimo, and Korgan and we’ll get their responses to Tolgerias as well.

Hint: INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS is fine to use even if there were no other interjections in the source state, i.e. if there’s just a single IF "" THEN GOTO blah. That is, as long as you plan to proceed to the original destination. It saves you the trouble of having to look up and input the destination.

8.6  INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Rastor.

There seems to be a great deal of confusion among the members of the modding community regarding the purpose and overall function of INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2. Allow me to take a moment to dispel the rumors that you may have heard.

INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2 is not intended as a replacement for INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS. INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS is a great function but it has a flaw in certain special cases. That’s what INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2 is intended to remedy. This difference between the two is best illustrated with an example.

Let us suppose that you want to add an NPC response to PPSAEM2 8. Here is some of what that state looks like before any mods have been applied:

IF ~~ THEN BEGIN 8 // from: 7.0
  SAY #44931 /* ~Blah blah blah~ */
  IF ~!IsValidForPartyDialog("Jaheira")
!IsValidForPartyDialog("Anomen")
!IsValidForPartyDialog("Edwin")
IsValidForPartyDialog("Viconia")~ THEN DO ~SetGlobal("WackoArmy","GLOBAL",1)
OpenDoor("DOOR12")
EscapeArea()~ UNSOLVED_JOURNAL #7045 EXTERN ~VICONIJ~ 129
END

Note that the DO actions include EscapeArea(). If you use INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS to add an interjection here, the DO actions will be performed by your interjector (usually a party member). The result is that after encountering this dialogue in the game the party member will leave the area (and Saemon will stay where he is!) promptly after performing the interjection. Instead, we want to keep the DO action associated with Saemon.

INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2 allows modders to remedy this problem. INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2 does exactly the same thing as INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS except that DO actions will be kept with their original actor and not transferred to the interjector.

To code your interjection using INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2, you would do this:

INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2 PPSAEM2 8
  ~Blah blah blah~
END

The dialogue state that WeiDU will create from this INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2 statement looks something like:

IF ~~ THEN BEGIN 133 // from:
  SAY #78199 /* ~Blah blah blah~ */
  IF ~!IsValidForPartyDialog("Jaheira")
!IsValidForPartyDialog("Anomen")
!IsValidForPartyDialog("Edwin")
IsValidForPartyDialog("Viconia")~ THEN UNSOLVED_JOURNAL #7045 EXTERN ~VICONIJ~ 129
END

Note that INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2 is not intended as a universal replacement for INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS. This is most obvious when using the command to interject into a state that starts a cutscene. Here is an example of an interjection into PPIRENI2 27.

The original, unmodded state:

IF ~~ THEN BEGIN 27 // from: 28.0 26.0
  SAY #44869 /* ~I bid you farewell, child of Bhaal. We shall not meet again.~
[IRENIC52] */
  IF ~~ THEN DO ~EraseJournalEntry(7252)
EraseJournalEntry(7253)
EraseJournalEntry(22952)
EraseJournalEntry(23306)
SetGlobal("AsylumPlot","GLOBAL",40)
StartCutSceneMode()
StartCutScene("Cut41j")~ SOLVED_JOURNAL #7255 EXIT
END

Using INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2 to code your interjection into this state will cause the game to crash when your interjection plays (because the special StartCutSceneMode() action cannot occur in the middle of a dialogue, loosely). INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS will work properly, however.

8.7  state WEIGHTs

stateTriggerStrings, the conditions that determine what state should be used for the beginning of a dialogue, may have WEIGHTs. These WEIGHTs are used by the Infinity Engine to choose which state to pick if multiple state triggers evaluate to "true". [ In reality, the WEIGHTs are just the offsets within the state trigger table in the DLG file, but this detail is not important unless you are writing your own tool. ] WEIGHTs only make sense for stateTriggerStrings that are not empty.

If multiple stateTriggerStrings evaluate to true, the Infinity Engine will pick the state with the lowest WEIGHT. Usually the weighting follows the order of state declaration in the D file. That is, the first state mentioned has the lowest weight (i.e., will be picked first in case of a tie) and the last state mentioned has the highest weight (i.e., will be picked last in case of a tie). However, you may include an explicit WEIGHT directive to change things around. For example, consider this D file:

BEGIN foozle
  IF ~True()~ THEN BEGIN a SAY ~Jason~ END
  IF ~True()~ THEN BEGIN b SAY ~yada~ END
  IF ~True()~ THEN BEGIN c SAY ~Compton~ END
  IF ~True()~ THEN BEGIN d SAY ~kelsey~ END
If you talk to foozle, it will always say Jason. However, you may explicitly alter the weights so that the third state is picked first, as in:
BEGIN foozle
  IF WEIGHT #10 ~True()~ THEN BEGIN a SAY ~Jason~ END
  IF            ~True()~ THEN BEGIN b SAY ~yada~ END
  IF WEIGHT #2  ~True()~ THEN BEGIN c SAY ~Compton~ END
  IF            ~True()~ THEN BEGIN d SAY ~kelsey~ END
With this D file, foozle will always say Compton. All states with WEIGHT directives come before all states without them. States without WEIGHT directives are ranked in order of appearance. So the state order for foozle.DLG is c-a-b-d. Yes, this is complicated.

Strong Style Suggestion: do not use the WEIGHT directive in your hand-made D files. Just use the implicit ordering.

The WEIGHT directive was introduced to facilitate handling of Bioware-created DLG files (e.g., BJAHEIR.DLG) that include tricky weighting. Only states with non-empty triggers are given implicit weights. If you create a D file from a DLG that features non-trivial weighting, WeiDU will emit comments like this:

IF WEIGHT #8 /* Triggers after states #: 11 12 24 25 26 36 58 even though
                they appear after this state */
  ~True()~ THEN BEGIN 10 // from:
    SAY #52190 /* ~Please do not interrupt our thoughts. We must prepare
      carefully if we are to see a weakness in the illithid web. ~ */
    IF ~~ THEN EXIT
END
to remind you that the order is not what you think.

All non-empty state triggers in DLG files are given weights counting up from 0 to the maximum number of state triggers in the DLG file. You may use any number you like (even a negative one): WeiDU will simply sort them. ADD_STATE_TRIGGERdoes not change the weight associated with that trigger. APPEND can be used to give a non-trivial weight to a state, as in:

APPEND BJAHEIR
  IF WEIGHT #-999 ~MyCondition()~ THEN BEGIN mystate SAY ~My Stuff~ END
END
Since BJAHEIR will have implicit WEIGHTs in the range from #0 to about #50, this causes mystate to have priority over all states that already exist in BJAHEIR. Without such drastic action, APPENDed states will have use the implicit ordering, and will thus have the lowest priority (because they appear at the end of the file). Multisay and CHAIN also append states, but since they always append states with empty stateTriggerStrings, WEIGHTs are not relevant.

Consider the following example:

BEGIN foozle
  IF WEIGHT #10 ~True()~ THEN BEGIN a SAY ~Jason~ END
  IF            ~~ THEN BEGIN b SAY ~yada~ END
  IF WEIGHT #2  ~True()~ THEN BEGIN c SAY ~Compton~ END
  IF            ~True()~ THEN BEGIN d SAY ~kelsey~ END
  ADD_STATE_TRIGGER foozle 1 /* state b */ ~MyCondition()~
The resulting foozle dialogue will still have the c-a-b-d weighting order.

Here’s another example:

BEGIN foozle
  IF            ~True()~ THEN BEGIN a SAY ~Jason~ END
  IF            ~~ THEN BEGIN b SAY ~yada~ END
  IF            ~True()~ THEN BEGIN c SAY ~Compton~ END
  IF            ~True()~ THEN BEGIN d SAY ~kelsey~ END
  ADD_STATE_TRIGGER foozle 1 /* state b */ ~MyCondition()~
The resulting foozle dialogue will have the (expected) a-b-c-d ordering.

However, consider this evil example:

  //////
  // foozle.DLG contents, assume it has already been created and is
  // sitting on your hard drive somewhere
  // IF            ~True()~ THEN BEGIN a SAY ~Jason~ END
  // IF            ~~ THEN BEGIN b SAY ~yada~ END
  // IF            ~True()~ THEN BEGIN c SAY ~Compton~ END
  // IF            ~True()~ THEN BEGIN d SAY ~kelsey~ END
  //////

  // new D file
  ADD_STATE_TRIGGER foozle 1 /* state b */ ~MyCondition()~
This will update foozle and the resulting order will be a-c-d-b (because when foozle.DLG was loaded from the disk, a c and d were given weights but b was not (because it had an empty trigger)). Thus, you should avoid using ADD_STATE_TRIGGER on states with empty triggers unless you know what you are doing.

8.8  TRA Translation Files

If you are writing a mod and you would like to make it easier to translate it into another language you can use "translation files" (much like BGII itself uses DIALOG.TLK) to separate your dialogue structure and content. A translation file basically lists the string texts in order. For example,

C:\Program Files\Black Isle\BGII - SoA\> WeiDU --trans SCSARLES.DLG

This creates scsarles.D and scsarles.tra. scsarles.D now contains:

IF ~NumTimesTalkedTo(0)~ THEN BEGIN 0 // from:
  SAY @1 /* ~Who is it? Might I ask why you have disturbed my meditations?
    My creative muse must be gently awakened, and your stomping about is
    simply not conducive to this.~ [SARLES02] #28655 */
  IF ~~ THEN REPLY @2
    /* ~My apologies. I will leave you to your thinking.~ #28656 */ GOTO 1
  IF ~~ THEN REPLY @3 /* ~I apologize, but I have come to request your
  talent on a commissioned artwork.~ #28657 */
    DO ~SetGlobal("TalkedToSarles","GLOBAL",1)~ GOTO 2
END 
Note that all of the strings have been replaced by @number and the texts have been put in comments.

The translation file scsarles.tra contains all of those strings:

// SCSARLES translation file
@1   = ~Who is it? Might I ask why you have disturbed my meditations?
My creative muse must be gently awakened, and your stomping
about is simply not conducive to this.~ [SARLES02]
@2   = ~My apologies. I will leave you to your thinking.~
@3   = ~I apologize, but I have come to request your talent on a commissioned artwork.~ 
You may then ask someone who speaks another language to write a new translation file by translating every string in scsarles.tra. This prevents the string text and the structure from getting out of sync and simplifies translation; non-technical players can translate raw text files easily.

When compiling a D file that contains @number translation references you must supply (at least) one translation file. For example, you might say:

C:\Program Files\Black Isle\BGII - SoA\> WeiDU SCSARLES.D italian.tra

You may specify multiple translation files. The last one to define a string wins. This is useful if one language is more up to date than the others. In this example:

C:\Program Files\Black Isle\BGII - SoA\> WeiDU SCSARLES.D english.tra italian.tra

Strings will be taken from the italian translation whenever possible, but if they are not available it will fall back on the english versions.

You may use WeiDU to check and make sure that translations are up to date. WeiDU will automatically generate a text file listing all of the strings that are present in one translation (usually your native one) that are missing in another. You can then send this file to your translators so that they know what to do. This example command compares all of the TRA files in the american and french directories and creates a file called MISSING.

C:\Program Files\Black Isle\BGII - SoA\> weidu --tcmp-from american --tcmp-to french --out MISSING

8.9  Converting a “hard-coded” D to a D/TRA pair (Last Update: v200)

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Jason Compton.

D and TP2 files allow programmers to describe text either literally:

// Greeting.d
SAY ~Hello.~
or with a companion TRA (translation) file that supports multiple languages:
// Greeting.d
SAY @1

// Greeting.tra
@1 = ~Hello.~
The idea being that one can make a French version of Greeting.tra which contains
// French-Greeting.tra
@1 = ~Bonjour.~
However, some WeiDU users, for reasons of convenience or simply never anticipating the opportunity to translate, may have originally chosen the "hard-coded" approach but now regret that decision. --traify will break out all the text in SAY, REPLY, and JOURNAL entries into translation-ready format. --traify may also be used on TP2 files.

To turn the hard-coded D file FWKI.d into a new D/TRA combo, use --traify and --out to specify the input and output filenames, respectively:

C:\Program Files\Black Isle\BGII - SoA\> weidu --traify fwki.d --out fwki-new.d

After a brief pause, fwki-new.d and fwki-new.tra will be created.

The --traify process turns fwki.d’s

APPEND J#KLSYJ
  IF ~~ THEN BEGIN KelseySAHPR4
    SAY ~Urk. Who was the lucky donor?~
    IF ~~ THEN EXTERN SAHPR2 10
  END
END 
into fwki-new.d’s
APPEND J#KLSYJ
  IF ~~ THEN BEGIN KelseySAHPR4
    SAY @0
    IF ~~ THEN EXTERN SAHPR2 10
  END
END 
and in the newly created fwki-new.tra, you will find
@0    = ~Urk. Who was the lucky donor?~
and this dialogue file is now ready for translation.

--traify works from the top of the D down, starting at @0. It will NOT skip over any existing @x translation references it finds, so if your D contains any translation support at all, it is best to use --traify-old-tra as well.

Because standard --traify starts at @0 and is unaware of any any existing @x entries in the D, if you have begun to convert a D to a D/TRA pair by hand, you may have @x entries that clash with --traify’s results.

In other words, if you already have a state that says

IF ~~ THEN BEGIN blah
  SAY @0
  IF ~~ THEN EXIT
END
--traify will not skip @0 automatically, you will have two locations where @0 is used but you intended to use two different strings, and this will be bad.

To avoid this problem, add the --traify-old-tra argument to specify the file containing the already traified strings:

C:\Program Files\Black Isle\BGII - SoA\> weidu --traify fwki.d --traify-old-tra fwki.tra --out fwki-new

will put the existing and new ones @x references in fwki-new.tra.

Finally, note that --traify works for BAF files as well.

Note: We were previously suggesting to use --traify# here. Unless you want for some reason to have new references starting at a given number, you should use --traify-old-tra instead.

In all cases, you might also find it beneficial to put the --traify-comment argument in your command line, so that you’ll also have the content of the @references in your file (which will make it easier to edit it later):

C:\Program Files\Black Isle\BGII - SoA\> weidu --traify fwki.d --traify-old-tra fwki.tra --out fwki-new --traify-comment

In particular, using --traify-comment and --traify-old-tra together will add the missing comments without doubling the existing ones.

8.10  REPLACE_ACTION_TEXT

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Japheth.

REPLACE_ACTION_TEXT can be used with regular expressions (regexp). So, some actions such as CreateCreature("blah",[0.0],1) won’t be matched by WeiDU because when you say [0.0] it is looking for a character set.

Here’s one dialogue that I’m fixing and how to do it correctly.

Arghai.dlg has this action trigger before REPLACE_ACTION_TEXTing it.

CreateCreature("OGREHA",[1351.1078])

There’s no point given, which makes WeiDU and NI angry. To fix it using REPLACE_ACTION_TEXT this is what you have to do:

REPLACE_ACTION_TEXT arghai
~CreateCreature("OGREHA",\[1351.1078\])~
~CreateCreature("OGREHA",[1351.1078],0)~

So, all you have to remember to do is escape the square brackets with a backslash so WeiDU doesn’t confuse them with a regular expression.

8.11  ALTER_TRANS (Last Update: 204.)

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by CamDawg.

ALTER_TRANS is a more compatibility-friendly way of changing transitions in an existing dialogue state. This is best illustrated with an example; let’s use state 9 from doghma.dlg in BG2:

IF ~~ THEN BEGIN 9 SAY #45751
  IF ~~ THEN REPLY #45752 GOTO 2
  IF ~GlobalLT("chapter","GLOBAL",4)~ THEN REPLY #45753 GOTO 5
  IF ~~ THEN REPLY #45754 GOTO 4
  IF ~Global("RevealUmar","GLOBAL",1)
      PartyHasItem("miscbl")
      PartyHasItem("miscbm")
      PartyHasItem("miscbn")
      PartyHasItem("miscbo")~ THEN REPLY #57922 GOTO 10
  IF ~~ THEN REPLY #45755 GOTO 1
END

The problem lies in transition 3, which should have an OR(4) before those four PartyHasItem checks. Before ALTER_TRANS, the least destructive way to fix it would be

ADD_TRANS_TRIGGER DOGHMA 9 ~False()~ DO 3
EXTEND_BOTTOM DOGHMA 9
IF ~Global("RevealUmar","GLOBAL",1)
OR(4)
PartyHasItem("miscbl")
PartyHasItem("miscbm")
PartyHasItem("miscbn")
PartyHasItem("miscbo")~ THEN REPLY #57922 GOTO 10
END

This presents some compatibility issues though. If another mod has altered this transition (for example, a new action via ADD_TRANS_ACTION) then those changes are lost via this method. It also reorders the replies as they’re displayed on-screen--not a big issue for transitions involving replies, but it is a big issue for non-reply transitions where they’re evaluated from the bottom-up. It’s also an issue for other mods that target this transition, as the False() essentially eliminates it. Enter ALTER_TRANS:

ALTER_TRANS DOGHMA // file name
BEGIN 9 END // state number (can be more than one)
BEGIN 3 END // transition number (can be more than one)
BEGIN // list of changes, see below for flags
  "TRIGGER" ~Global("RevealUmar","GLOBAL",1)
           OR(4)
             PartyHasItem("miscbl")
             PartyHasItem("miscbm")
             PartyHasItem("miscbn")
             PartyHasItem("miscbo")~
END

There are eight flags you can use in the list of changes. If you do not use a particular flag, the previous value of the transition will be retained (i.e. not specifying an ACTION flag will preserve the current action of the transition).

Let’s try one last example. This is bviconi.dlg, state 103:

IF WEIGHT #22 ~Global("LoveTalk","LOCALS",46)~ THEN BEGIN 103 SAY #10537
  IF ~~ THEN REPLY #10538 GOTO 367
  IF ~~ THEN REPLY #10539 EXTERN ~~ 0
END

As you can see the transition destination for the second transition is broken. In the olden days this would be fixed with

ADD_TRANS_TRIGGER BVICONI 103 ~False()~ DO 1
EXTEND_BOTTOM BVICONI 103
IF ~~ THEN REPLY #10539 GOTO 368
END

With ALTER_TRANS, it becomes much easier:

ALTER_TRANS BVICONI BEGIN 103 END BEGIN 1 END BEGIN "EPILOGUE" ~GOTO 368~ END

Addendum: please note that it’s important to wrap the target (for example, REPLY or EPILOGUE) in quotes, tildas, or percentage signs.

Further addendum: REPLY, JOURNAL and friends will remove the feature (rather than add an empty journal line or whatever) if the associated string is empty.

9  Module Packaging: TP2 Files

At some point you will be done with your mod (a collection of CRE, ITM, D, etc., files) and you will want to package it up so that other users can install it (and then perhaps uninstall it later) easily. WeiDU can handle this task for you (and you may freely distribute WeiDU.exe with your module).

A TP2 describes how to install components of your module. WeiDU will read the file, ask the user questions, and then perform the installation. Uninstallation and upgrading are also handled.

See the file examples/mymod.tp2 for a commented example of how this all works.

Here is the context-free grammar syntax for the TP2 file format:

TP2 File  A TP2 File is a text file that contains a number of mod Components. TP2 Files tell WeiDU how to install various parts of your mod on an end-user’s computer.
isBACKUP directoryName

AUTHOR emailAddress

TP2 Flag list

Language list

Component list

A TP2 File is basically a prologue and then a list of Components. The BACKUP declaration tells WeiDU where to put backed-up versions of files that would be overwritten so that they can be uninstalled later. This directory will be created automatically if it is missing. The AUTHOR directive gives an email address for users to send bugs to if there are problems during the installation. The TP2_AUTHOR variable is set to the “emailAddress” value. The TP2_FILE_NAME variable is set to the name of the tp2 file. The TP2_BASE_NAME variable is set to the name of the tp2, excluding any initial “setup-”. For “setup-mymod.tp2”, TP2_FILE_NAME is set to “setup-mymod.tp2”, while TP2_BASE_NAME is set to “mymod.tp2”. The MOD_FOLDER variable is set to the root directory of directoryName. If directoryName is “mymod/thisIsUnconventional/backup”, MOD_FOLDER is set to “mymod”. TP2 Flags set global options. Languages are the various languages in which your mod is available. The Finally, the Components make up the actual meat of your mod. Different Components can be installed or uninstalled separately, but all of the parts within a Component are treated as a unit.
 
TP2 Flag A TP2 Flag declaration tells WeiDU to apply some global option to your TP2 file.
isAUTO_TRA path The AUTO_TRA flag is used with the COMPILE TP2 Action. It automatically loads TRA files that match your D files. The TRA file loaded by AUTO_TRA takes precedence over all other TRA files.
orALLOW_MISSING file list ALLOW_MISSING directive allows you to specify files that can be missing (when you try to copy them or reference them from D files). Empty versions of those files will be created on demand. Try to use ACTION_IF instead of this.
orASK_EVERY_COMPONENT This flag instructs WeiDU to ask about installing every component in this TP2 file individually, rather than asking questions like "Would you like to install them all?"
orALWAYS TP2 Action list END This flag specified a TP2 Action that is executed at the beginning of each Component, before the component-specific TP2 Action.
orREADME file list The given file is displayed to the user after choosing the language, but before installing any component. If more than one file name is provided, they are checked for existence in the order they’re provided, and the first available one will be opened. If you wish to open multiple readme files, use multiple README statements.
orUNINSTALL_ORDER String list Do not use this without a real reason.

Specifies the order in which uninstallation operations are handled. The operations are STRSET (uninstall STRING_SET and ALTER_TLK), MOVE (uninstall MOVE), AT (perform AT_UNINSTALL and AT_INTERACTIVE_UNINSTALL) and COPY (uninstall all various file operations).

If not specified, the order is MOVE - STRSET - COPY - AT.

If this is specified, then ALL operations must be specified (if any isn’t, a warning is printed). Please note that this means that your mod might start printing warnings three years down the line if a new uninstall action is coded.

orMODDER String list Enable additional debug info. By default, these messages are verbose but do not halt the installation. Some options are configurable, see the MODDER in-depth description.
orVERSION String "String" (variables evaluated) will be appended to every component’s name in the weidu.log file.
orSCRIPT_STYLE style This flag determines how WeiDU will read in BAF and BCS files and write out BAF and BCS files. Possible options for “style” include BG (the default), IWD1, IWD2, and PST. See the Scripting Styles tutorial.
orNO_IF_EVAL_BUGthis action solves a long-standing bug with the IF_EVAL action. Since solving it is not directly possible without damaging backwards compatibility, you have to use this action (preferably in an ALWAYS statement) to solve the bug for yourself. IF_EVAL will not work with this action in the TP2 - use PATCH_IF and BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES instead.
orQUICK_MENU lots of parameters Used to specify one or more groups of components that can be installed in a single step. See the QUICK_MENU tutorial for syntax, usage instructions, and caveats.
orAUTO_EVAL_STRINGS EVALUATE_BUFFER is used whenever variables are evaluated. In particular, you can now "forget" about using it in FUNCTIONs and arrays. Note, TP2 defines multiple instances of EVALUATE_BUFFER, like EVALUATE_BUFFER, but these are not affected by AUTO_EVAL_STRINGS.
 
Language  A Language declaration tells WeiDU where to find TRA files.
isLANGUAGE languageName languageDirectory defaultLanguageTRA list The languageName is the name of the language as it is presented to the user. "American English" and "Italiano" are examples. The languageDirectory is the name of the subdirectory in which you have stored the TRA files for that language. Examples include "american" and "spanish". The variable named LANGUAGE is set to languageDirectory if the user selects this language.. Finally, all of the TRA files in the defaultLanguageTRA list are loaded as soon as the user selects a language.
 
Component  A Component is a contiguous group of files and actions that a user can install, uninstall or upgrade.
isBEGIN componentName Component Flag list TP2 Action list Basically, if componentName is "Foo", the user will be asked: "Do you want to install Foo?". If so, all of the associated TP2 Actions are performed. If not, they are skipped.
 
Component Flag  A Component Flag determines how WeiDU treats a component.
isDEPRECATED String Mark the given component as deprecated. If it is currently installed, it will be uninstalled and the given String will be displayed. The user will never be asked to install the given component -- it will be silently skipped in all listings. However, it will still take up a “component number”.
orREQUIRE_COMPONENT modToUninstall modComponent String Make this component so that it can only be installed if another component is installed. If that other component is not installed, the String will be displayed and the user will not get a chance to install this component. This is in some sense the opposite of the UNINSTALL TP2 Action. For example, REQUIRE_COMPONENT "setup-ease.tp2" "0" "You must have infinite stacking installed!" prevents a component from being installed unless the infinite stacking part of the Ease-of-Use mod is installed.
orFORBID_COMPONENT modToUninstall modComponent String Make this component so that it can only be installed if another component is not installed. This does the opposite of REQUIRE_COMPONENT.
orREQUIRE_PREDICATE value String This component can only be installed if the value evaluates to true (non-zero).
orSUBCOMPONENT String [ value ] At most one component of the given subcomponent group can be installed at any time. All subcomponents of the same group are listed together for the user. See the SUBCOMPONENT tutorial.
orFORCED_SUBCOMPONENT String [ value ] See the SUBCOMPONENT tutorial.
orGROUP String [ value ] Used for grouping components; the user will be asked to display these or not. See the GROUP tutorial.
orINSTALL_BY_DEFAULT If WeiDU would ask the user whether to install this component or not, and this component is not already installed, WeiDU will instead install it by default (without asking the user). If there is an error or the component is already installed, WeiDU will ask the user. The --uninstall command-line argument overrides this. See also REQUIRE_COMPONENT and ALWAYS.
orDESIGNATED forcedNumber Normally module components are numbered based on their order in the TP2 file (starting from 0). This flag sets the current component number to forcedNumber. The next component (if it lacks a DESIGNATED flag) will be forcedNumber+1. You can easily shoot yourself in the foot by setting forcedNumber too low (e.g., so that multiple components have the same number).
orNO_LOG_RECORD Normally all module components are recorded in WeiDU.log and can be uninstalled later. This component flag prevents this component from writing a log record when it is successfully installed. As a result it is “invisible” to WeiDU, can be installed multiple times, and cannot be uninstalled with WeiDU. Do not use this flag without a real reason.
orLABEL String Defines the LABEL, or unique textual identifier, of this module. Any component can have zero or more LABELs. Will print a warning if two components in the same tp2 share a LABEL. Do not alter a component’s LABEL once you publish that mod.
 
TP2 Action  A TP2 Action tells WeiDU how to install a component. This usually involves copying files and writing in new string references.
isCOPY optNoBackup optGlob fromFile toFile ... patch list when list You may specify as many fromFile-toFile pairs as you like. Each fromFile is copied to its associated toFile. If there are any WeiDU variables inside explicit %s in toFile or fromFile, they are replaced by their values. All of the patches are applied. If there are any when conditions and any of them are false, the copy does not happen. A typical example is COPY "mymod/sword.itm" "override/m#sword.itm".

COPY commands set the user-defined SOURCE_DIRECTORY, SOURCE_FILESPEC, SOURCE_FILE, SOURCE_RES, SOURCE_EXT, DEST_DIRECTORY, DEST_FILESPEC, DEST_FILE,DEST_RES and DEST_EXT variables based on fromFile and toFile as follows. If fromFile is mymod/cre/bigboss.cre, then SOURCE_DIRECTORY is mymod/cre, SOURCE_FILESPEC is mymod/cre/bigboss.cre, SOURCE_FILE is bigboss.cre, SOURCE_RES is bigboss and SOURCE_EXT is cre. The DEST_ variables are similarly based on toFile. In addition, SOURCE_SIZE is set to the size (in bytes) of the source file.

This is generally only useful if you have enabled globbing. Any user-defined variables in toFile are replaced with their values. You may also reference these variables in patches.

See the Module Distribution section for information about finding a good unique prefix for your mod-created resources.

orCOPY_EXISTING optNoBackup fromFile toFile ... Behaves like COPY except that the fromFiles are drawn from the game BIFFs or override directory. This is useful for making changes to files that other mods may have changed as well.
orCOPY_EXISTING_REGEXP optNoBackup optGlob fromFileRegexp toDirOrFile ... patch list when list Behaves like COPY_EXISTING except that fromFileRegexp may contain regular expressions (regexps). Additionally, toDirOrFile may reference matched groups in fromFileRegexp with \1, \2, etc. If toDirOrFile is an existing directory or lacks a file extension, it will be treated as a directory and all matching files in the game BIFFs will be copied there. Otherwise, toDirOrFile will be treated as a file.

If GLOB is specified, matching files in override will also be patched and copied. If a file appears in both the BIFFs and the override folder, it will only be copied once. For example, if HARM.ITM is in the BIFFs and HARM2.ITM is in override, this code will copy and patch them both:

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP GLOB ~HARM.*.ITM~ ~override~
  SAY // ... whatever
orCOPY_LARGE optNoBackup optGlob fromFile toFile ... Behaves like COPY except that the fromFiles can be of arbitrary size (the limit should be over a Gigabyte), but on the other side of the coin you can’t apply patches to the copying.

Like COPY, COPY_LARGE sets the variables SOURCE_DIRECTORY, SOURCE_FILESPEC, SOURCE_FILE, SOURCE_RES, SOURCE_EXT, SOURCE_SIZE, DEST_DIRECTORY, DEST_FILESPEC, DEST_FILE, DEST_RES and DEST_EXT.

orCOPY_RANDOM ( file1 list ) [ ( fileN list ) list ] patch list when list This command works like COPY_EXISTING but the destination for any given source file in the file1-list is some other different file in the file1-list. Similarly, the destination for any file in the fileN-list is some other file in the fileN-list. This allows you to randomly shuffle categories of game resources.
orCOPY_ALL_GAM_FILES patch list when list Copies Default.gam from the biff and the ones in the save/ and mpsave/ saved games, applying the list of patches. If there are any when conditions and any of them are false, the copy does not happen. NO BACKUP is applied to files in the save/ and mpsave/ directories. The savegame from the biffs is backed up as usual.
orMOVE optNoBackup fromFile toFile ... ( directory-file-regexp ) toFile ... If optNoBackup is specified, in addition to the usual effects, fromFile may be moved to toFile even if one or both contain spaces in their names. Do not use this feature without a real reason.

You may specify as many fromFile--toFile pairs as you like. Each fromFile is moved to its associated toFile.

If fromFile is a file, toFile can be a file or a directory; if fromFile is a directory, toFile must be a directory; if fromFile doesn’t exist, an error is raised. If toFile already exists, MOVE is equivalent to COPY_LARGE.

MOVE also supports the directory-file-regexp construct in place of fromFile; in this form, it must be wrapped in parenthesis, toFile must be a directory, and no error is raised if no file is matched. Examples:

MOVE ~sourceFile~ ~destinationFile~
MOVE ~sourceFile~ ~destinationDirectory~
MOVE ~sourceDirectory~ ~destinationDirectory~
MOVE (~sourceDirectory~ ~^[A-M].*\.itm$~) ~destinationDirectory

Safety notes: when uninstalling, MOVE is restored first, then all generic actions are restored, then AT_*_UNINSTALL is handled. As such, do your AT_NOW, then do your COPY, then do your MOVEs (exception: if you MOVE for biffing purposes, it is safe to call MAKE_BIFF after MOVE. Do not use the --make-biff command-line argument).

orDELETE optNoBackup file ... Removes one or more files from the file system. If file is a directory, it will be recursively deleted together with anything it contains.

Do not use without a real reason.

orDISABLE_FROM_KEY file ... Removes one or more files from the chitin.key, while leaving the containing bif file itself untouched.

Do not use without a real reason.

orCREATE type [ VERSION version ] resref [ patch list ] Creates a new file of the specified type with the resource reference resref and a correct file extension for the file type. If there are any patches, they are applied to contents of the new file. Any existing file with the same name will be backed up, as normal. The file will be created structurally correct but will contain no non-zero data aside from the structural details. The file version will be native to the current game, or default to "V1.0", but can be overridden with the VERSION option, which takes a string specifying the desired version. CREATE supports the file types ARE, CRE, EFF, ITM, SPL and STO and all their known file versions (aside from EFF V1.0, which is never found as a file).
orCOMPILE [ EVALUATE_BUFFER ] sourceFile list [ patch list ] [ USING traFile list ] This command compiles D and BAF source files. If sourceFile is a directory, all D and BAF files within that directory are processed individually. If there is EVALUATE_BUFFER, all %variables% in the files are substituted with their values.

After the special EVALUATE_BUFFER is executed, all other patches are executed.

First, this loads all of the traFiles presented. If any of their paths contain %s, the %s is replaced with the languageDirectory of from the Language the user selected. If you specified AUTO_TRA mymod/%s above, WeiDU will also attempt to load mymod/languageDirectory/sourceFile.tra for every sourceFile in the list. Once all of the TRA files are loaded, the D and BAF files are compiled. Any DLGs or BCSs they create or modify are placed in the override directory.

orCLEAR_MEMORYremoves all variables from the memory, then reloads the automatic ones (TP2_AUTHOR, TP2_FILE_NAME, TP2_BASE_NAME, MOD_FOLDER, LANGUAGE, WEIDU_ARCH, WEIDU_OS, COMPONENT_NUMBER, all numeric constants such as NAME1, the soundsets, or SCRIPT_OVERRIDE). INTERACTIVE is automatically set when you call the next component. Do not use this feature without a real reason.
orCLEAR_ARRAYSremoves the names and contents of all arrays from the memory (while still keeping their values).
orCLEAR_CODESRemoves all loaded functions and macros from the memory.
orCLEAR_INLINEDRemoves all inlined files from the memory.
orCLEAR_EVERYTHINGRuns CLEAR_MEMORY, CLEAR_ARRAY, CLEAR_CODES and CLEAR_INLINED.
orCLEAR_IDS_MAPforce WeiDU to remove all loaded IDSes in memory (otherwise, if you compile a script, append to an IDS and compile another script, WeiDU will not handle the new IDS entry).
orACTION_CLEAR_ARRAY String ‘Forgets’ that the array string exists until its values are recalled. The actual variables’ values are kept, the only effect is that *PHP_EACH will not consider old values.
orSILENTmakes WeiDU skip all messages; it’s reenabled once a component is installed (or fails to), or a PRINT, PATCH_PRINT, VERBOSE or PATCH_VERBOSE is found.
orVERBOSEundoes the latest SILENT command.
orMKDIR dirName list Instructs WeiDU to create all of the directories in the list.
orRANDOM_SEED someInteger Sets the random number generator seed to someInteger. This allows you to get reproducible results when using random functions. If you specify a string that is not a valid integer the system initializes itself (e.g., by using the current time).
orACTION_READLN variable Waits for the user to provided an enter-terminated string and store it in variable. Said string will be stored and re-used during non-interactive reinstalls. See the READLN tutorial.
orAPPEND optNoBackup filename newText when list [ KEEP_CRLF ] If there are no when conditions or they are all true, the ASCII text newText is appended to the existing file filename (which is read from the game BIFFs or the override folder). Any variables in newText are replaced by their values.

If KEEP_CRLF is not present, double newlines in the file (but not in newText) will be removed; otherwise, they’re kept.

In any event, if the file ends with CRLF only newText and an ending CRLF will be written; otherwise, if the file does not end with CRLF, it will be written before newText.

orAPPEND_OUTER optNoBackup filename newText when list [ KEEP_CRLF ] If there are no when conditions or they are all true, the ASCII text newText is appended to the existing file filename (which is treated as a path to a file). Any variables in newText are replaced by their values.

If KEEP_CRLF is not present, double newlines in the file (but not in newText) will be removed; otherwise, they’re kept.

In any event, if the file ends with CRLF only newText and an ending CRLF will be written; otherwise, if the file does not end with CRLF, it will be written before newText.

orAPPEND_COL optNoBackup filename newText [ prepend ] when list If there are no when conditions or they are all true, the string newText is appended column-wise to the existing file filename (which is read from the game BIFFs or the override folder). If filename was:
A B C
D E F
X Y Z
P Q R
and newText was "0 1 2 3", the result would be:
A B C 0
D E F 1
X Y Z 2
P Q R 3
You must have the same number of whitespace-separated words in newText as there are columns in filename. Prepend empty cells are assumed to be at the beginning of newText. A cell containing exactly $ is printed as empty.
orAPPEND_COL_OUTER optNoBackup filename newText [ prepend ] when list If there are no when conditions or they are all true, the string newText is appended column-wise to the existing file filename (which is treated as a path to a file). If filename was:
A B C
D E F
X Y Z
P Q R
and newText was "0 1 2 3", the result would be:
A B C 0
D E F 1
X Y Z 2
P Q R 3
You must have the same number of whitespace-separated words in newText as there are columns in filename. Prepend empty cells are assumed to be at the beginning of newText. A cell containing exactly $ is printed as empty.
orEXTEND_TOP existingBCS newFile patch list [ USING traName list ] Loads existingFile (which may be BAF or BCS), prepends all of newBCS to the top of it, applies all of the patches, and then copies it to the override folder. User variables in the filenames existingFile and newFile are replaced by their values. Use EVALUATE_BUFFER if you want to evaluate variables inside the body of newFile before parsing it.
orEXTEND_BOTTOM existingBCS newFile patch list [ USING traName list ] As EXTEND_TOP, but the newFile file is put at the bottom of the existingBCS file. User variables in the filenames existingFile and newFile are replaced by their values.
orEXTEND_TOP_REGEXP existingBCSregexp newFile patch list [ USING traName list ] As EXTEND_TOP, but the newFile file is put at the top of the every BCS file that matches the regexp existingBCSregexp.
orEXTEND_BOTTOM_REGEXP existingBCSregexp newFile patch list [ USING traName list ] See EXTEND_TOP_REGEXP.
orACTION_IF value THEN BEGIN TP2 Action list END [ ELSE BEGIN TP2 Action list END ] If value evaluates to true (non-zero), the TP2 Actions in the THEN-branch are executed. Otherwise, if an ELSE-branch is present, its commands are executed. Otherwise nothing happens.
orACTION_MATCH value WITH [ guardvalue ... [ WHEN conditionvalue ] BEGIN TP2 Action list END ] ... DEFAULT TP2 Action list END The value is case-insensitively matched against the guard values. If value matches one of the guard values, the associated action list is executed. If there is a condition, it additionally needs to evaluate to true for the values to match. If none of the values match, the DEFAULT action list is executed.

See the MATCH and TRY tutorial for additional information.

orACTION_TRY TP2 Action list WITH [ guardvalue ... [ WHEN conditionvalue ] BEGIN TP2 Action list END ] ... DEFAULT TP2 Action list END If evaluating the action list results in an error, the error is matched, as per ACTION_MATCH.

See the MATCH and TRY tutorial for additional information.

orACTION_RERAISE When used inside an ACTION_TRY, the matched error is re-raised.

See the MATCH and TRY tutorial for additional information.

orAT_EXIT commandToRun [ EXACT ] Whenever this component attempts to be installed, commandToRun is executed. Variables (e.g., %LANGUAGE%) in the string commandToRun are replaced by their values. Note that the command is executed even if the component does not install correctly, so AT_EXIT should probably be the last command in a component.
  • If commandToRun consists of a single TP2 filename, WeiDU will enqueue that TP2 file and run it when the current one is done (asking the user all the standard questions about languages and which components to install).
  • If commandToRun consists of the word VIEW followed by a file, a system-specific viewer will be used to present the file to the user. For example, on Windows systems notepad will be used to view txt files and a web browser will be used to view html files. Note: also NOTEPAD and EXPLORER work like this, but use of those are reserved to differently able modders.
  • Otherwise, commandToRun is executed by the underlying operating system (and is thus system dependant). If you want to do something that WeiDU doesn’t handle, like extracting WAVs from an MP3, make a batch file and run it from here.
Slashes and backslashes will be converted appropriately for the underlying operating system. If EXACT is specified, / and \ will instead be preserved as they are. The most common usage is:
AT_INTERACTIVE_EXIT ~VIEW mymod\README.txt~
This causes your README file to be displayed using a system appropriate viewer. Here’s a more complicated example that pulls up a language-specific README if one is available:
ACTION_IF FILE_EXISTS ~mymod\README.%LANGUAGE%.txt~ THEN BEGIN
  AT_INTERACTIVE_EXIT ~VIEW mymod\README.%LANGUAGE%.txt~
END ELSE BEGIN
  AT_INTERACTIVE_EXIT ~VIEW mymod\README.txt~
END
orAT_INTERACTIVE_EXIT commandToRun [ EXACT ] As AT_EXIT, but the command is only executed if the user specifically asked for the component to be installed or upgraded.
orAT_UNINSTALL commandToRun [ EXACT ] As AT_EXIT, but when this component is removed, commandToRun is executed.
orAT_INTERACTIVE_UNINSTALL commandToRun [ EXACT ] As AT_EXIT, but whenever the user specifically asks for this component to be removed, commandToRun is executed. Only the %LANGUAGE% variable is guaranteed to be replaced, so do not count on any others.
orAT_UNINSTALL_EXIT commandToRun [ EXACT ] As AT_UNINSTALL, but executed at the end of the WeiDU run (after printing ’SUCCESFULLY INSTALLED xyz’).
orAT_INTERACTIVE_UNINSTALL_EXIT commandToRun [ EXACT ] As AT_UNINSTALL_EXIT, but only whenever the user specifically asks for this component to be removed.
orAT_NOW commandToRun [ EXACT ] As AT_EXIT, but commandToRun is executed when found, rather than at the end of the installation. Use with oggdec, tisunpack, wav2acm... but not with readmes (you’ll create dozens of windows), nor with --make-biff (you’ll crash the installation).
orAT_INTERACTIVE_NOW commandToRun [ EXACT ] As AT_NOW, but commandToRun is executed only if the installation is run interactively.
orMAKE_BIFF name-of-biff BEGIN directory-file-regexp list END Create a biff Data/name-of-biff.bif from the files that can be matched by directory-file-regexp. The chitin.key file is restored as a normal file, and reloaded whenever the component is installed or uninstalled (which means that its contents will be available exactly when the biff exists), while the .bif file itself is deleted or on uninstall as usual.
orLOAD_TRA traName list Loads all traName files (variable substitution is done; the file can be inlined) to be used in the following tp2 actions, as if you had declared them in LANGUAGE.
orWITH_TRA traName list BEGIN TP2 Action list END Creates a new TRA scope copied from the surrounding scope, loads all traName files (variable substitution is done; the file can be inlined) and evaluates the TP2 Actions. When WITH_TRA exits, the new TRA scope is discarded, that is, all TRA changes made by WITH_TRA or any of its enclosed actions are forgotten.
orWITH_SCOPE BEGIN TP2 Action list END Creates a new variable scope copied from the surrounding scope and evaluates the TP2 Actions inside the new scope. When WITH_SCOPE exits, the new scope is discarded, all new variables defined inside the scope and all changes to existing variables are forgotten.
orUNINSTALL modToUninstall modComponent If the given component of the given mod is currently installed, uninstall it before proceeding. Do not use this action without a real reason. This should only be used if you release a new version of a component under a new name. For example, many Tactics Mod components replace old Solaufein mod components. In order to prevent such a component from being installed twice, the Tactics version uninstalls the Solaufein version.
orCOPY_KIT oldKit newKit ( diffName diffValue list ) Copies a copy of the oldKit kit called newKit. This copy is non-player selectable, while all other fields can be edited by setting diffName to the field to be changed and diffValue to the new value. Valid values for diffName are:
clasweap
weapprof
abclasrq
abclsmod
abdcdsrq
abdcscrq
dualclas
alignmnt
clab
lower
mixed
help
luabbr
25stweap
unusabilities
Currently, lower, mixed and help can only be numbers referring to a TLK string. Unusabilities requires to be both kit and class unusables, there isn’t a way to BAND or BOR them.
orADD_KIT internalKitName String1 String2 String3 String4 String6 String7 String8 String9 String10 String11 String12 String13 SAY text1 SAY text2 SAY text3 This command allows you to add new kits to the BGII. See the example file mymod.tp2 or the tutorial at http://gibberlings3.net/forums/index.php?showtopic=584 for information on how to do this.

ADD_KIT sets the variable %internalKitName% to the number your kit occupies in kitlist.2da. This value is exactly 0x4000 less than the number your kit is assigned in kit.ids. Also observe that the kit DWORD in the CRE file format is big-endian, unlike all other fields in the CRE file format.

Most arguments to ADD_KIT are strings to be appended verbatim to 2DA files, detailed as follows:

Argument2DA fileVerbatim
String1clasweapYes
String2weapprofYes
String3abclasrqYes
String4abclsmodYes
String5abdcdsrqYes
String6abdcscrqYes
String7alignmntYes
String8dualclasYes
String12luabbrNo
String1325stweapNo

Strings that are appended verbatim need to include the kit name at the very start of the string. Strings that are not appended verbatim should not include the kit name, as it is added automatically.

String9 is the path to the CLAB-style 2DA file of your kit.

String10 is a list of which class and race combinations the kit should be available for, as per kittable.2da.

String11 is the unusability information and parent class used in kitlist.2da.

Note that if String12 denotes a custom HLA table, you need to copy the new 2DA file into the game manually. ADD_KIT merely appends to luabbr.2da.

text1, text2 and text3 are, respectively, the lower name, mixed name and description of your kit.

The BG2: ToB engine cannot handle more than 255 kits installed (if you try to check Kit(Somebody,kit256) or AddKit(kit256), the game crashes to desktop). As such, WeiDU will currently refuse to install a 256th kit. This limitation is lifted on GemRB, or if suitable versions of ToB Hacks or ToBEx are installed,

orADD_MUSIC internalMusicName newMUSFile newMUSFile is copied to the music directory and added to songlist.2da under the name internalMusicName. The variable %internalMusicName% is set to the number of this new entry in songlist.2da. If newMUSFile already exists, the variable %internalMusicName% is set to the existing entry in songlist.2da and all other operations are skipped. Variables are evaluated.

Some versions of the Infinity Engine cannot handle more than 100 entries in songlist.2da. ADD_MUSIC will fail under those circumstances unless the appropriate versions of ToB Hacks or ToBEx are installed or the game is GemRB or BGEE.

orADD_SCHOOL schoolName removalString Creates a new (guaranteed-unique) spell school (as per mschool.2da), associate removalString (can be a tra reference) to its removal, and sets the schoolName variable to the school identifier.

If mschool.2da already contains schoolName, the variable is set to the school’s current identifier and no other operation is performed.

orADD_SECTYPE sectypeName removalString Creates a new (guaranteed-unique) spell secondary type (as per msectype.2da), associate removalString (can be a tra reference) to its removal, and sets the sectypeName variable to the sectype identifier.

If msectype.2da already contains sectypeName, the variable is set to the sectype’s current identifier and no other operation is performed.

orADD_AREA_TYPE areaTypeName Adds a new (guaranteed-unique) area type to areatype.ids, and sets the areaTypeName variable to the index of the bit the type is associated with: the type can be set with WRITE_SHORT 0x48 THIS | (1 << areaTypeName).

If areatype.ids already contains areaTypeName, the variable is set to the type’s current identifier and no other operation is performed.

Also note that only 8 area types can be added to an unmodded installation of BG2; as such, don’t add a new area type type unless you really need it (most likely, another modder is already using a type with a similar name, and you can share the type between your mods without issue).

orADD_PROJECTILE modpath/PROName.PRO Appends an entry for PROName to PROJECTL.IDS and assigns it the next available ProRef number. Then copies the file modpath/PROName.PRO to the override folder. The new ProRef number can be accessed through the variable %PROName% and used to updated the Projectile type field of an ITM or SPL file’s Item Ability or Spell Ability sub-structures. (The hexadecimal offsets for these fields can be found using NearInfinity.) In the following example, a new PRO file and an ITM file that will use it are added to the game:
ADD_PROJECTILE      ~MyMod/MYDXP.PRO~
COPY ~MyMod/MYDART.ITM~ ~override/MYDART.ITM~
  WRITE_SHORT   0x09c ~%MYDXP%~
orADD_SPELL newSPLfile type level idsName patch list [ IF_EXISTING patch list END ] [ ON_DISABLE patch list END ] adds newSPLfile as a spell of type and level into the game (IE, SPPR102 or whatnot), in the first empty slot possible, appends the idsName to spell.ids, and sets %idsName% to the 4-digit code associated with idsName in Spell.ids. While you copy newSPLfile to the override, you also apply the patches listed.

If Spell.ids already contains a spell named idsName, of the same type and level than the one you’re adding, then that spell is overwritten (rather than adding a duplicate version). If you have the IF_EXISTING section, its patches are applied to the current version instead.

If Spell.ids already contains a spell named idsName, but of of different type and/or level than the one you’re adding, then the current reference is removed from spell.ids, and then the action proceeds as usual. In this case, if there is the ON_DISABLE section, the patches declared there will be applied to the older spell.

orADD_JOURNAL [ EXISTING ] [ MANAGED ] [ TITLE ( text ) ] reference list [ USING traFile list ] If the game is not of an EE-type, this action does nothing. If the game is of an EE-type, this action patches BGEE.SQL or BGEE.LUA (depending on game version) with the provided quests and journal entries, so they will work with the EE-type journal system.

For each of the provided references, which are taken to be journal entries, the first line of text, up to a newline character, is taken to be the title of the journal entry. Titles isolated in this way have any trailing whitespace and full stops trimmed. The title is added as a separate string to the TLK, together with the complete journal entry. The game files patched with the strrefs of the title and journal entry. Each unique title is given a unique quest id and journal entries that share titles end up sharing quest ids.

If EXISTING is specified, the strref of the title is matched against the existing title strrefs. If a match is found, the journal entry is added under the quest id of the existing quest. Otherwise it is added as a new quest. Note that TITLE should be given a string reference in this case. ADD_JOURNAL cannot guarantee correct results if EXISTING is used without TITLE or if TITLE is given a string or tra reference instead of a string reference.

If MANAGED is specified, all provided journal entries are given a unique, non-zero quest-group number. They share the same quest-group number regardless of whether they share the same title. If EXISTING is also specified, the quest-group numbers for all existing journal entries that match the provided titles are assigned a quest-group number, provided they do not already have one. This option does nothing unless the game version supports quest groups.

If TITLE is specified, the provided text is used as the title for all provided journal entries. The titles of each individual journal entry remains unchanged, they are just all listed under the same title.

For more information on ADD_JOURNAL and some usage examples, refer to the journal section of this tutorial.

orSTRING_SET indexOrString newValue list [ USING traFile ] This command replaces each given string in the user’s TLK file with the associated newValue. If a traFile is given, that file is is read once before all of the replacements take place and its contents are forgotten after.
orSTRING_SET_EVALUATE value newValue list [ USING traFile ] This command replaces the string at index value in the user’s TLK file with the associated newValue. If a traFile is given, that file is is read once before all of the replacements take place and its contents are forgotten after. If the index value equals the current number of strings in the TLK file (for example, through NEXT_STRREF), newValue will be added to the TLK file as a new string. This addition is made with no deduplication. Use with caution, as this will continue to grow the TLK file each time the mod is reinstalled.
orSTRING_SET_RANGE #min #max USING traFile For every integer i between min and max (inclusive) we do STRING_SET i @i USING traFile (except that this command should be executed more rapidly). The command will fail if @i is not defined (either by traFile or by some other tra file in scope) for some i between min and max.
orALTER_TLK_RANGE value value BEGIN patch list END Executes the given patch list on all the strings *currently* in dialog.tlk between the two given values (both inclusive). This means that strings added in the current mod installation will not be patched, and strings already altered via ALTER_TLK* and/or STRING_SET* will be patched from the pre-patch condition.
orALTER_TLK_LIST BEGIN value list END BEGIN patch list END Executes the given patch list on all the strings *currently* in dialog.tlk from the given list. This means that strings added in the current mod installation will not be patched, and strings already altered via ALTER_TLK* and/or STRING_SET* will be patched from the pre-patch condition.
orALTER_TLK BEGIN patch list END Executes the given patch list on all the strings *currently* in dialog.tlk. This means that strings added in the current mod installation will not be patched, and strings already altered via ALTER_TLK* and/or STRING_SET* will be patched from the pre-patch condition. Consider using ALTER_TLK_RANGE with the base game’s boundaries instead.
orREQUIRE_FILE filename warningString If filename does not exist (or the bif file is not referenced inside the chitin.key), warningString is displayed and this component cannot be installed. This is checked before any actions are executed.
orFORBID_FILE filename warningString If filename does exist (or the bif file is referenced inside the chitin.key), warningString is displayed and this component cannot be installed. This is checked before any actions are executed.
orFAIL warningString If this TP2 Action is executed, warningString is displayed and the component fails to install.
orWARN displayString The string DisplayString is echoed to the user. Useful for debugging or status reports. If displayString contains %variable% references, their values will be displayed. Additionally, INSTALLED WITH WARNINGS is printed at the end of the install.
orPRINT displayString The string DisplayString is echoed to the user. Useful for debugging or status reports. If displayString contains %variable% references, their values will be displayed.
orLOG displayString The string DisplayString is echoed to setup-mymod.debug. If displayString contains %variable% references, their values will be displayed.
orOUTER_TEXT_SPRINT variable stringWithVars Any WeiDU variables (enclosed in %s) inside stringWithVars are replaced by their values and the resulting string (constructed at mod-installation time!) is assigned to the variable variable. This works somewhat like sprintf() but it not as cool.
orOUTER_SPRINT variable stringWithVars Like OUTER_TEXT_SPRINT, but stringWithVars can be an @reference, and will break --traify. Use OUTER_TEXT_SPRINT instead.
orOUTER_SET variable = value Update variable so that it is equal to value.
orOUTER_SET variable += value Equivalent to OUTER_SET variable = variable + value.
orOUTER_SET variable -= value Equivalent to OUTER_SET variable = variable - value.
orOUTER_SET variable *= value Equivalent to OUTER_SET variable = variable * value.
orOUTER_SET variable /= value Equivalent to OUTER_SET variable = variable / value.
orOUTER_SET variable &= value Equivalent to OUTER_SET variable = variable BAND value.
orOUTER_SET variable |= value Equivalent to OUTER_SET variable = variable BOR value.
orOUTER_SET variable <<= value Equivalent to OUTER_SET variable = variable BLSL value.
orOUTER_SET variable >>= value Equivalent to OUTER_SET variable = variable BLSR value.
orOUTER_INNER_PATCH buffString BEGIN patch list END Any WeiDU variables inside %s within buffString are replaced by their values. All of the patches given are evaluated as if the contents of the current file were buffString. Any modifications to buffString are thrown away. This is considered an action, not a patch.
orOUTER_PATCH buffString BEGIN patch list END Equal to OUTER_INNER_PATCH, if you feel that OUTER_INNER sounds wrong.
orOUTER_INNER_PATCH_SAVE savevar buffString BEGIN patch list END As with OUTER_INNER_PATCH, except that any modifications to buffString are stored inside savevar.
orOUTER_PATCH_SAVE savevar buffString BEGIN patch list END Equal to OUTER_INNER_PATCH_SAVE, if you feel that OUTER_INNER sounds wrong.
orOUTER_WHILE value BEGIN TP2 Action list END If value is non-zero, execute the given TP2 Action list and then repeat, re-evaluating the value. Be very careful when using this command. You can easily describe an infinite loop. See the WHILE loop tutorial for more information.
orOUTER_FOR ( patch list ; value ; patch list ) BEGIN TP2 Action list END The TP2 Action OUTER_FOR (init;pred;inc) BEGIN body END is equivalent to init WHILE pred BEGIN INNER_ACTION BEGIN body END inc END, except that it’s considered an action. Note that the predicate value cannot be empty.
orACTION_BASH_FOR directory-file-regexp BEGIN TP2 Action list END for all files that match directory-file-regexp, sets a bunch of variables and executes the actions for each file found. Assuming the file being copied is somedir/yourfile.cre, the following variables will be set:
"%BASH_FOR_DIRECTORY%" = "somedir"
"%BASH_FOR_FILESPEC%" = "somedir/yourfile.cre"
"%BASH_FOR_FILE%" = "yourfile.cre"
"%BASH_FOR_RES%" = "yourfile"
"%BASH_FOR_EXT%" = "cre"
"%BASH_FOR_SIZE%" = <size of somedir/yourfile.cre>
orACTION_DEFINE_ARRAY String1 BEGIN String2 list END Sets the array $string1(0),$string1(1) etc. to the various elements in string2.
orGET_FILE_ARRAY String path regexp The array $string(0), $string{1} etc is set to the file names, including path, that match regexp in path. The path is relative to the installation directory (e.g. save/000000000-Auto-Save).
orGET_DIRECTORY_ARRAY String path regexp Like GET_FILE_ARRAY except regexp is matched against directories instead of files.
orACTION_DEFINE_ASSOCIATIVE_ARRAY String BEGIN key1 [ , key2 ... ] => result1 list END Sets the array $string, indexed by the keys, to the corresponding results. The results can either be Strings or values. Example:
ACTION_DEFINE_ASSOCIATIVE_ARRAY mix_with_blue BEGIN
  red => purple
  yellow => green
END
orACTION_FOR_EACH String1 IN String list BEGIN TP2 Action list END will set the string1 variable to each value in string list and process each action.
orACTION_PHP_EACH String1 AS String2 => String3 list BEGIN TP2 Action list END For every value of the string1 array that has been created or read, sets string2_0 to the first array parameter, string2_1 to the second array parameter, etc. and string3 to the result of the array. string2 will also contain the first array parameter (as a synonym of string2_0). then executes the actions listed. More exhaustive documentation will be provided by SConrad.
orINCLUDE String list loads the file string as if it were a list of tp2 actions and executes it (as if it had been typed inside your tp2). These files have by convenience tph as an extension, due to no reason other than randomness (you can use .tp1 or .xyzsucks if you’re so oriented). Please note that, to speed up inclusions, tph files are stored in memory, rather than re-read each time from the hard-disk. If you need automorphing code (IE, you want to edit your tph file), you can use REINCLUDE instead.
orACTION_INCLUDE String list A synonym of INCLUDE.
orREINCLUDE String list Works like INCLUDE, but loads each time the tph file from the hard disk. This is slower, but required if you want to edit your tph file between an inclusion and another.
orACTION_REINCLUDE String list A synonym of REINCLUDE.
or<<<<<<<< fileName fileBody >>>>>>>> (That’s eight (8) angle brackets on each side.) For the purposes of copying and compiling files, WeiDU will pretend that fileName is a real file with contents fileBody. This allows you to define inlined files inside your TP2 file. Such definitions must be executed before the inlined file is used. Other operations on fileName (such as FILE_EXISTS, FILE_MD5 or FILE_SIZE) are undefined. Inlined files will be skipped by COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP and other “wildcard” approaches: you must name them directly. Unlike most other WeiDU things, spacing matters here. After the initial <<<<<<<< there can be any number of spaces. The first non-space character after the <<<<<<<< is the first character of fileName. All other characters up to and excluding the newline on that line are part of fileName (and thus fileName cannot start with a space or contain a newline). All user variables (e.g., %foo%) in fileName will be replaced by their values. The fileBody contains all characters after that newline up to and excluding the >>>>>>>>. Note that a single inlined filename namespace is shared by WeiDU for all TP2 files it reads (it might read other TP2 files in the process of installing yours in order to uninstall or reinstall another mod’s components), so it is critically important that you use some sort of unique prefix. I also suggest that you avoid using your mod’s actual directory structure (if any) in order to avoid confusion with real files. Consider using .../yourmod-inlined/fileName. Here is a concrete working example:
BEGIN ~MyMod Component 1~

<<<<<<<< .../mymod-inlined/myfile.baf
IF
  True()
THEN
  RESPONSE #100
    Kill("Anomen")
END
>>>>>>>>

COMPILE ~.../mymod-inlined/myfile.baf~
This inclusion method is eight-bit clean, so if you are very careful you can inline a binary file (e.g., a CRE or BAM) with this method. Be careful to shave off the newline before the >>>>>>>> in such cases. Finally, note that inlined files have the same maximum size as other (non-BIFF) WeiDU files and strings (usually about 16 megs).
orACTION_TO_UPPER variable Turns to upper-case the contents of %variable% and store the results in variable.
orACTION_TO_LOWER variable Turns to lower-case the contents of %variable% and store the results in variable.
orACTION_GET_STRREF value variable The string reference value is looked up in DIALOG.TLK and the (male) string (without any quotes) is stored in the variable.
orACTION_GET_STRREF_F value variable The string reference value is looked up in DIALOGF.TLK and the female string (without any quotes) is stored in the variable. If there is no DIALOGF.TLK, the string from DIALOG.TLK is used instead.
orACTION_GET_STRREF_S value variable The string reference value is looked up in DIALOG.TLK and the sound reference associated with the (male) string is stored in the variable. If the string has no sound, the empty string is used instead.
orACTION_GET_STRREF_FS value variable The string reference value is looked up in DIALOGF.TLK and the sound reference associated with the female string is stored in the variable. If there is no DIALOGF.TLK, the sound reference associated with the string from DIALOG.TLK is used instead. If the string has no sound, the empty string is used instead.
orDECOMPRESS_BIFF file ... Decompresses one or more biff files from either "BIF V1.0" or "BIFCV1.0" into "BIFFV1 ". The biff file is looked for in /data and the CD paths specified in baldur.ini. You should consequently not specify the biff path, merely the name. All matching biff files are decompressed, even ones that are duplicated between CD paths. The biff file is backed up to another file in the same directory before it is decompressed. Since multiple games can share the same biffs, this action is not uninstalled together with the mod.

WeiDU will raise a Failure exception if the biff is not found in any of the paths.

Decompressing a biff file can be helpful in preventing crashes related to area files, commonly WAV ambient sounds or TIS files. Do not use this action without a real reason.

orDEFINE_ACTION_MACRO String BEGIN TP2 Action list END Define an action macro. Refer to the macros section for additional information.
orDEFINE_PATCH_MACRO String BEGIN patch list END Define a patch macro. Refer to the macros section for additional information.
orDEFINE_ACTION_FUNCTION String [ INT_VAR variable = value ... ] [ STR_VAR variable = String ... ] [ RET variable ... ] BEGIN TP2 Action list END Define an action function. Refer to the Functions section for additional information.
orDEFINE_PATCH_FUNCTION String [ INT_VAR variable = value ... ] [ STR_VAR variable = String ... ] [ RET variable ... ] BEGIN patch list END Define a patch function. Refer to the Functions section for additional information.
orLAUNCH_ACTION_MACRO String Launch an action macro. Refer to the macros section for additional information. You may use LAM as a synonym for LAUNCH_ACTION_MACRO.
orLAUNCH_ACTION_FUNCTION String [ INT_VAR variable [ = value ] ... ] [ STR_VAR variable [ = [ EVALUATE_BUFFER ] String ] ... ] [ RET variable [ = String ] ... ] END Launch an action function. Refer to the Functions section for additional information. You may use LAF as a synonym for LAUNCH_ACTION_FUNCTION.
 
optNoBackup  A COPY, MOVE or DELETE command normally makes a backup copy of its target (if one exists) so that the mod can be uninstalled later by restoring the backup.
is If you don’t say anything here, WeiDU will make a backup copy of the file and the COPY, MOVE or DELETE will be undone if the mod is uninstalled.
or+If you put a + here, WeiDU will not make a backup copy of the file and the COPY, MOVE or DELETE will not be undone if the mod is uninstalled. Do not use this feature without a real reason.
or-If you put a - here, WeiDU will not copy the file, but only store it as an inlined file (so you can patch a file and then use it for EXTEND_BOTTOM or whatever). This option is not available for COPY_LARGE, MOVE or DELETE.
 
directory-file-regexp This is a directory path and a regexp string. It’s used by MAKE_BIFF, ACTION_BASH_FOR and PATCH_BASH_FOR for listing patterns to be matched. Please note that the directory / filename distinction must be enforced.
isdirectory regexpget a list of all files in directory that match regexp. Case doesn’t matter.
ordirectory EVALUATE_REGEXP regexpget a list of all files in directory that match regexp. Case doesn’t matter. This is the same as the above item.
ordirectory EXACT_MATCH nameget the file directory/name. Please note that the directory / filename distinction must be enforced.
 
optGlob  A COPY command may use globbing to expand filename wildcards with respect to files on the host filesystem. Unlike COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP, glob wildcards do not range over game resources. Instead, they range over physical files actually on the disk.
isGLOBUse local filesystem globbing. Globbing is generally architecture specific!

Here is a concrete example. Imagine that CHITIN.KEY contains two files: C1.ITM and C2.ITM. The override contains C2.ITM and C_MOD.ITM.

  COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP "C.*.ITM" "override"
    // catches C1.ITM, C2.ITM

  COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP GLOB "C.*.ITM" "override"
    // catches C1.ITM, C2.ITM, C_MOD.ITM

  COPY "override" "override"
    // catches C2.ITM, C_MOD.ITM

To put it another way: if you do not specify GLOB with COPY_EXISTING, WeiDU pretends that the override directory contains 0 files that are not in CHITIN.KEY. Finally, GLOB has no effect on wildcards in the "destination" part of the COPY:

  COPY GLOB "mymod/foo" "music/*"
    // this is illegal: DO NOT DO THIS
orNOGLOBNever use local file system globbing.
or Use sane defaults: enable globbing with COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP, disable it with COPY.
 
optcase Allows you to decide whether regexp matching is case-sensitive or not.
is Uses the WeiDU default (which is undocumented and varies with the action). Please specify case-sensitiveness manually.
orCASE_SENSITIVEmatching is case-sensitive.
orCASE_INSENSITIVEmatching is case-insensitive.
 
 
optexact Allows you to decide whether regexp matching is exact.
is Uses the WeiDU default (which is undocumented and varies with the action). Please specify matching policy manually.
orEXACT_MATCHonly the given string is searched for.
orEVALUATE_REGEXPmatching is evaluated following the usual regexp conventions.
 
 
patch A patch tells WeiDU how to modify a file.
isSAY offset String The string-ref associated with String is written at offset. This is commonly used to change the name or description of a spell or item.
orPATCH_FAIL warningString If this TP2 Action is execution, warningString is displayed and the component fails to install.
orPATCH_WARN displayString The string DisplayString is echoed to the user. Useful for debugging or status reports. If displayString contains %variable% references, their values will be displayed. Additionally, INSTALLED WITH WARNINGS is printed at the end of the install.
orPATCH_PRINT displayString The string DisplayString is echoed to the user. Useful for debugging or status reports. If displayString contains %variable% references, their values will be displayed. See also PRINT. Example:
COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP ~.*\.CRE~ ~override~
  READ_BYTE 0x272 race
  READ_BYTE 0x273 class
  PATCH_IF class = 3 THEN BEGIN
    PATCH_PRINT
      ~%SOURCE_FILE% is a cleric with race = %race%.~
  END
orPATCH_LOG displayString The string DisplayString is echoed to setup-mymod.debug. If displayString contains %variable% references, their values will be displayed.
orSAY_EVALUATED offset stringWithVars Any WeiDU variables (enclosed in %s) inside stringWithVars are replaced by their values and the resulting string (constructed at mod-installation time!) is added to DIALOG.TLK and its string reference it written to the offset. Example:
COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP ~RING.*.ITM~ ~override~
  READ_LONG 0x38 cost
  SAY_EVALUATED IDENTIFIED_DESC
    ~I Am %SOURCE_RES%, I Cost %cost%~
orTO_UPPER variable Turns to upper-case the contents of %variable% and store the results in variable.
orTO_LOWER variable Turns to lower-case the contents of %variable% and store the results in variable.
orTEXT_SPRINT variable stringWithVars Any WeiDU variables (enclosed in %s) inside stringWithVars are replaced by their values and the resulting string (constructed at mod-installation time!) is assigned to the variable variable. This works somewhat like sprintf() but it not as cool. Currently this is the only way to assign a string value to a variable.
orSPRINT variable stringWithVars Like TEXT_SPRINT, but stringWithVars can be an @reference, and will break --traify. Use TEXT_SPRINT instead.
orSNPRINT value variable stringWithVars As SPRINT, but only the first N characters are stored in the variable, where N is the result of evaluating the value. This works somewhat like snprintf(). Thus:
SPRINT "author" "Jason"
SNPRINT 3 "myvar" "1:%author%"
... assigns 1:J to myvar.
orSOURCE_BIFF variable filename If filename is in a biff (whether it is also in the override or not), sets variable to the name of the containing biff (the name is printed as E.G. data/items.bif).
orSPACES variable stringWithVars %variable% will be inited to a string the same length as stringWithVars, but made entirely of spaces. SPACES var ~123~ will create %var% = " ".
orQUOTE variable stringWithVars %variable% will be inited to a string that will match exactly stringWithVars. QUOTE var ~some\thing^~ will create %var% = "some\\thing\^".
orREPLACE optcase optexact regexp text All occurrences of regexp in the file are replaced with the ASCII printing of the string reference for text. So if regexp is "FRED" and the text ends up being strref #1234, "FRED" will be replaced with "1234". This is usually used to replace string references in BCS files (where they are stored textually). Put a command like DisplayString(Myself,99999) in your BCS file and use something like REPLACE 99999 "Hello, World".
orREPLACE_TEXTUALLY optcase optexact regexp string [ ( sizeValue ) ] All occurrences of the given regexp in the file are replaced with the given string. variable substitution (e.g., kit and music names) is performed on both the string and the regexp. If you use the sizeValue field, optexact is automatically set to true (IE without regexp patterns). The regexp and the string are padded by zeros to be long exactly sizeValue bytes.
orEVALUATE_BUFFER_SPECIAL string String must be one character long. Any WeiDU variables (like XmyvarX) inside the current file are replaced by their values, where X is to be intended as string. Example:
<<<<<<<< .../mymod-inlined/script.baf
IF
  See($myvar$)
THEN
  RESPONSE #100
    Kill(%myvar%)
END
>>>>>>>>
EXTEND_TOP ~sola.bcs~ ~.../mymod-inlined/script.baf~
  SPRINT myvar = ~"Anomen"~
  EVALUATE_BUFFER_SPECIAL ~$~
myvar will be substituted with Anomen, but %myvar% will be not.

Do not use this without a real reason.

orEVALUATE_BUFFER Any WeiDU variables (like %myvar%) inside the current file (which should probably be a plain text file in order for this to make much sense) are replaced by their values. Example:
<<<<<<<< .../mymod-inlined/script.baf
IF
  See(%myvar%)
THEN
  RESPONSE #100
    Kill(%myvar%)
END
>>>>>>>>
EXTEND_TOP ~sola.bcs~ ~.../mymod-inlined/script.baf~
  SPRINT myvar = ~"Anomen"~
  EVALUATE_BUFFER
Those two actions extend the top of sola.bcs with the script block IF See("Anomen") THEN RESPONSE #100 Kill("Anomen") END. You can also use EVALUATE_BUFFER in COMPILE actions or before strings in values. You may use EVAL as a synonym for EVALUATE_BUFFER.
orAPPLY_BCS_PATCH patchFile Applies patchFile to the current file. See --bcmp-from and similar command-line arguments for constructing these patches.
orAPPLY_BCS_PATCH_OR_COPY patchFile copyFile Applies patchFile to the current file, as APPLY_BCS_PATCH. However, if the patching fails the current file is replaced with copyFile instead.
orWRITE_BYTE offset value The first argument is the offset at which the second argument (an 8-bit byte value) is written. Performs READ_BYTE offset THIS and READ_SBYTE offset STHIS automatically (you can now write WRITE_BYTE 100 THIS 2).
orWRITE_SHORT offset value The first argument is the offset at which the second argument (a 16-bit short value) is written. Performs READ_SHORT offset THIS and READ_SSHORT offset STHIS automatically.
orWRITE_LONG offset value The first argument is the offset at which the second argument (a 32-bit long word value) is written. Performs READ_LONG offset THIS and READ_SLONG offset STHIS automatically.
orWRITE_ASCII offset ascString [ #requiredSize ] The ASCII ascString is written to the file starting at offset. If you specify a requiredSize then exactly that many bytes are written (if ascString is smaller, it is padded with NULs; if ascString is larger, it is truncated). If you do not specify a requiredSize, the terminating NUL is not written.
orWRITE_ASCII_LIST offset ascString list The given ASCII strings are written at offset, offset + 8, offset + 16... Automatically evaluates variables. You may use WRITE_ASCIIL as a synonym for WRITE_ASCII_LIST.
orWRITE_ASCII_TERMINATE offset ascString The ASCII ascString is written to the file starting at offset. The terminating NUL is written. You may use WRITE_ASCIIT as a synonym for WRITE_ASCII_TERMINATE.
orWRITE_EVALUATED_ASCII offset ascString [ #requiredSize ] The ASCII ascString is evaluated (so %variable% is replaced by its value) and written to the file starting at offset (as in WRITE_ASCII). You may use WRITE_ASCIIE as a synonym for WRITE_EVALUATED_ASCII.
orWRITE_FILE offset filename The entire contents of “filename” (which may contain variables) are loaded and copied over the current file starting at offset offset. “filename” must be a literal filename like mymod/data/file.bam. If there is not enough room between offset and the end of the file for the contents of “filename” the patch will fail with an error message.
orINSERT_FILE offset filename Just like WRITE_FILE except that the entire contents of “filename” are inserted at offset, just as if you had done an INSERT_BYTES with the size of “filename” to that offset followed by a WRITE_FILE to that offset.
orAPPEND_FILE [ TEXT ] filename Appends the contents of filename onto the current file. If TEXT is specified, the contents of filename and the current file is separated by a newline character (LF) unless the first character of filename or the last character of the current file is a newline character.
orAPPEND_FILE_EVALUATE [ TEXT ] filename Just like APPEND_FILE except that %variables% in the contents of filename are evaluated before the appending.
orREPLACE_BCS_BLOCK [ EVALUATE_BUFFER ] optcase oldFile newFile [ ON_MISMATCH patch list END ] If the current file is a BCS file, the segment of it corresponding to oldFile is replaced with the contents of newFile. oldFile and newFile may be BCS or BAF files. If they are BAF files they will not get the benefit of AUTO_TRA.

If EVALUATE_BUFFER is given, variables inside oldFile and newFile are evaluated, but only they are BAF files.

If the segment corresponding to oldFile is not found and the ON_MISMATCH section is present, those patches are run; if oldFile is not found and ON_MISMATCH is not present, a warning message is printed.

You may use R_B_B as a synonym for REPLACE_BCS_BLOCK.

orINSERT_BYTES offset value The first argument is the offset, the second argument is the count. The file will be expanded at the given offset with count bytes worth of zeroes.
orDELETE_BYTES offset value The first argument is the offset, the second argument is the count. The file will shrink as count bytes are deleted starting at the given offset.
orREAD_BYTE offset variable [ ELSE value ] An 8-bit value is read from the file at the given offset and is stored in the given variable. If offset is out-of-bounds and the ELSE is present, the ELSE-value is assigned to variable. If offset is out-of-bounds and the ELSE is not present, the patch fails with a visible error.
orREAD_SBYTE offset variable [ ELSE value ] As READ_BYTE, but the value is interpreted as signed.
orREAD_SHORT offset variable [ ELSE value ] A 16-bit value is read from the file at the given offset and is stored in the given variable. See READ_BYTE.
orREAD_SSHORT offset variable [ ELSE value ] As READ_SHORT, but the value is interpreted as signed.
orREAD_LONG offset variable [ ELSE value ] A signed 32-bit value is read from the file at the given offset and is stored in the given variable. See READ_BYTE.
orREAD_SLONG offset variable [ ELSE value ] As READ_SLONG, but the value is interpreted as signed.
orREAD_ASCII offset variable [ ELSE string ] [ ( value ) [ NULL ] ] A nul-terminated string is read from the file at the given offset and is stored in the given variable. The terminating nul is not stored. The default read size is 8 bytes. If an explicit size value is specified then that many bytes are read into the variable, even if some of them are nuls, except if NULL is present, in which case a nul-terminated string is read, without storing the terminating null. See READ_BYTE. If the offset is out-of-bounds and the ELSE clause is present, the string is evaluated as in WRITE_EVALUATED_ASCII and then assigned into variable.
orREAD_STRREF offset variable [ ELSE string ] A 32-bit Infinity Engine string reference is read from the file at the given offset. The string reference is looked up in DIALOG.TLK and the (male) string (without any quotes) is stored in the variable. In some sense this is the opposite of SAY_EVALUATED.
orREAD_STRREF_F offset variable [ ELSE string ] A 32-bit Infinity Engine string reference is read from the file at the given offset. The string reference is looked up in DIALOGF.TLK and the female string (without any quotes) is stored in the variable.
orREAD_STRREF_S offset variable [ ELSE string ] A 32-bit Infinity Engine string reference is read from the file at the given offset. The string reference is looked up in DIALOG.TLK and the sound reference associated with the (male) string is stored in the variable. If the string has no sound, the empty string is used instead.
orREAD_STRREF_FS offset variable [ ELSE string ] A 32-bit Infinity Engine string reference is read from the file at the given offset. The string reference is looked up in DIALOGF.TLK and the sound reference associated with the female string is stored in the variable. If there is no DIALOGF.TLK, the sound reference associated with the string from DIALOG.TLK is used instead. If the string has no sound, the empty string is used instead.
orGET_OFFSET_ARRAY String seven values The seven values are:
1. Offset
2. Read length of "Offset"
3. Iterations
4. Read length of "Iterations"
5. Index
6. Read length of "Index"
7. Length between iterations.

WeiDU comes with a number of pre-defined sets of values for GET_OFFSET_ARRAY. These sets are:

ARE_V10_ACTORS (0x54 4 0x58 2 0 0 0x110)
ARE_V10_REGIONS (0x5c 4 0x5a 2 0 0 0xc4)
ARE_V10_SPAWN_POINTS (0x60 4 0x64 4 0 0 0xc8)
ARE_V10_ENTRANCES (0x68 4 0x6c 4 0 0 0x68)
ARE_V10_CONTAINERS (0x70 4 0x74 2 0 0 0xc0)
ARE_V10_AMBIENTS (0x84 4 0x82 2 0 0 0xd4)
ARE_V10_DOORS (0xa8 4 0xa4 4 0 0 0xc8)
ARE_V10_ANIMATIONS (0xb0 4 0xac 4 0 0 0x4c)

ARE_V91_ACTORS (0x64 4 0x68 2 0 0 0x110)

CRE_V10_KNOWN_SPELLS (0x2a0 4 0x2a4 4 0 0 0xc)
CRE_V10_SPELL_MEM_INFO (0x2a8 4 0x2ac 4 0 0 0x10)
CRE_V10_EFFECTS (0x2c4 4 0x2c8 4 0 0 0x108)
CRE_V10_ITEMS (0x2bc 4 0x2c0 4 0 0 0x14)

ITM_V10_HEADERS (0x64 4 0x68 2 0 0 0x38)
ITM_V10_GEN_EFFECTS (0x6a 4 0x70 2 0x6e 2 0x30)

SPL_V10_HEADERS (0x64 4 0x68 2 0 0 0x28)
SPL_V10_GEN_EFFECTS (0x6a 4 0x70 2 0x6e 2 0x30)

STO_V10_ITEMS_PURCHASED (0x2c 4 0x30 4 0 0 0x4)
STO_V10_ITEMS_SOLD (0x34 4 0x38 4 0 0 0x1c)
STO_V10_DRINKS (0x4c 4 0x50 4 0 0 0x14)
STO_V10_CURES (0x70 4 0x74 4 0 0 0xc)

WMP_AREAS (0x34 4 0x30 4 0 0 0xf0)
WMP_LINKS (0x38 4 0x3c 4 0 0 0xd8)

GET_OFFSET_ARRAY performs "Iterations" number of reads and sets the array $string(0), $string(1) etc to the result of these reads. A more detailed explanation can be had in the GET_OFFSET_ARRAY and GET_OFFSET_ARRAY2 tutorial.

orGET_OFFSET_ARRAY2 String eight values The eight values are:
1. Offset2
2. Offset
3. Read length of "Offset"
4. Iterations
5. Read length of "Iterations"
6. Index
7. Read length of "Index"
8. Length between iterations

WeiDU comes with a number of pre-defined sets of values for GET_OFFSET_ARRAY2. These sets are:

ARE_V10_ITEMS (0x78 4 0x44 4 0x40 4 0x14)
ARE_V10_REGION_VERTICES (0x7c 4 0x2a 2 0x2c 4 0x4)
ARE_V10_CONTAINER_VERTICES (0x7c 4 0x54 2 0x50 4 0x4)
ARE_V10_DOOR_OPEN_OUTLINE_VERTICES (0x7c 4 0x30 2 0x2c 4 0x4)
ARE_V10_DOOR_CLOSED_OUTLINE_VERTICES (0x7c 4 0x32 2 0x34 4 0x4)
ARE_V10_DOOR_OPEN_CELL_VERTICES (0x7c 4 0x4c 2 0x48 4 0x4)
ARE_V10_DOOR_CLOSED_CELL_VERTICES (0x7c 4 0x4e 2 0x50 4 0x4)

CRE_V10_SPELL_MEM (0x2b0 4 0xc 4 0x8 4 0xc)

ITM_V10_HEAD_EFFECTS (0x6a 4 0x1e 2 0x20 2 0x30)

SPL_V10_HEAD_EFFECTS (0x6a 4 0x1e 2 0x20 2 0x30)

WMP_NORTH_LINKS (0x38 4 0x54 4 0x50 4 0xd8)
WMP_WEST_LINKS (0x38 4 0x5c 4 0x58 4 0xd8)
WMP_SOUTH_LINKS (0x38 4 0x64 4 0x60 4 0xd8)
WMP_EAST_LINKS (0x38 4 0x6c 4 0x68 4 0xd8)

As you can see, the value for Offset2 isn’t included in the sets, since it varies.

"Offset2" corresponds to the result from GET_OFFSET_ARRAY. "Offset" is read from the start of the file. "Iterations" and "Index" are read from Offset2 + value. Apart from that GET_OFFSET_ARRAY2 functions like GET_OFFSET_ARRAY. A more detailed explanation can be had in the GET_OFFSET_ARRAY and GET_OFFSET_ARRAY2 tutorial.

orDEFINE_ASSOCIATIVE_ARRAY String BEGIN key1 [ , key2 ... ] => result1 list END Sets the array $string, indexed by the keys, to the corresponding results. The results can either be Strings or values. Example:
DEFINE_ASSOCIATIVE_ARRAY mix_with_blue BEGIN
  red => purple
  yellow => green
END
You may use PATCH_DEFINE_ASSOCIATIVE_ARRAY as a synonym for DEFINE_ASSOCIATIVE_ARRAY.
orGET_STRREF value variable The string reference value is looked up in DIALOG.TLK and the (male) string (without any quotes) is stored in the variable.
orGET_STRREF_F value variable The string reference value is looked up in DIALOGF.TLK and the female string (without any quotes) is stored in the variable. If there is no DIALOGF.TLK, the string from DIALOG.TLK is used instead.
orGET_STRREF_S value variable The string reference value is looked up in DIALOG.TLK and the sound reference associated with the (male) string is stored in the variable. If the string has no sound, the empty string is used instead.
orGET_STRREF_FS value variable The string reference value is looked up in DIALOGF.TLK and the sound reference associated with the female string is stored in the variable. If there is not DIALOGF.TLK, the sound reference associated with the string from DIALOG.TLK is used instead. If the string has no sound, the empty string is used instead.
orSET variable = value Update variable so that it is equal to value.
orvariable = value Update variable so that it is equal to value.
or [ SET ] variable += value Equivalent to SET variable = variable + value.
or [ SET ] variable -= value Equivalent to SET variable = variable - value.
or [ SET ] variable *= value Equivalent to SET variable = variable * value.
or [ SET ] variable /= value Equivalent to SET variable = variable / value.
or [ SET ] variable &= value Equivalent to SET variable = variable BAND value.
or [ SET ] variable |= value Equivalent to SET variable = variable BOR value.
or [ SET ] variable <<= value Equivalent to SET variable = variable BLSL value.
or [ SET ] variable >>= value Equivalent to SET variable = variable BLSR value.
orWHILE value BEGIN patch list END If value is non-zero, execute the given patch list and then repeat, re-evaluating the value. Be very careful when using this command. You can easily describe an infinite loop. See the WHILE loop tutorial for more information.
orFOR ( patch list ; value ; patch list ) BEGIN patch list END The patch FOR (init;pred;inc) BEGIN body END is equivalent to init WHILE pred BEGIN body inc END. Note that the predicate value cannot be empty.
orPATCH_BASH_FOR directory-file-regexp BEGIN patch list END for all files that match directory-file-regexp, sets a bunch of variables and executes the patches for each file found. Assuming the file being copied is somedir/yourfile.cre, the following variables will be set:
"%BASH_FOR_DIRECTORY%" = "somedir"
"%BASH_FOR_FILESPEC%" = "somedir/yourfile.cre"
"%BASH_FOR_FILE%" = "yourfile.cre"
"%BASH_FOR_RES%" = "yourfile"
"%BASH_FOR_EXT%" = "cre"
"%BASH_FOR_SIZE%" = <size of somedir/yourfile.cre>
orDEFINE_ARRAY String1 BEGIN String2 list END Sets the array $string1(0),$string1(1) etc. to the various elements in string2.
orPATCH_DEFINE_ARRAY String1 BEGIN String2 list END Same as DEFINE_ARRAY.
orPATCH_FOR_EACH String1 IN String list BEGIN patch list END will set the string1 variable to each value in string list and process each patch.
orPHP_EACH String1 AS String2 => String3 list BEGIN patch list END For every value of the string1 array that has been created or read, sets string2_0 to the first array parameter, string2_1 to the second array parameter, etc. and string3 to the result of the array. string2 will also contain the first array parameter (as a synonym of string2_0). then executes the patches listed. More exhaustive documentation will be provided by SConrad.
orPATCH_PHP_EACH String1 AS String2 => String3 list BEGIN patch list END A synonym of PHP_EACH.
orCLEAR_ARRAY String ‘Forgets’ that the array string exists until its values are recalled. The actual variables’ values are kept, the only effect is that *PHP_EACH will not consider old values.
orPATCH_CLEAR_ARRAY String A synonym of CLEAR_ARRAY.
orPATCH_IF value [ THEN ] BEGIN patch list END [ ELSE BEGIN patch list END ] If value is non-zero, execute the first patch list once. Otherwise, execute the second patch list (if any). As a convenient shorthand, you may omit the BEGIN-END in the ELSE branch if the ELSE branch contains exactly one patch.
orPATCH_MATCH value WITH [ guardvalue ... [ WHEN conditionvalue ] BEGIN patch list END ] ... DEFAULT patch list END The value is case-insensitively matched against the guard values. If value matches one of the guard values, the associated patch list is executed. If there is a condition, it additionally needs to evaluate to true for the values to match. If none of the values match, the DEFAULT patch list is executed.

See the MATCH and TRY tutorial for additional information.

orPATCH_TRY patch list WITH [ patternvalue ... [ WHEN guardvalue ] BEGIN patch list END ] ... DEFAULT patch list END If evaluating the patch list results in an error, the error is matched, as per PATCH_MATCH.

See the MATCH and TRY tutorial for additional information.

orPATCH_RERAISE When used inside a PATCH_TRY, the matched error is re-raised.

See the MATCH and TRY tutorial for additional information.

orPATCH_INCLUDE String list loads the file string as if it were a list of tp2 patches and executes it (as if it had been typed inside your tp2). These files have by convention tpp as an extension, due to no reason other than randomness (you can use .tp1 or .xyzsucks if you’re so oriented). Please note that, to speed up inclusions, tpp files are stored in memory, rather than re-read each time from the hard-disk. If you need automorphing code (IE, you want to edit your tpp file), you can use PATCH_REINCLUDE instead.
orPATCH_REINCLUDE String list Works like PATCH_INCLUDE, but loads each time the tph file from the hard disk. This is slower, but required if you want to edit your tpp file between an inclusion and another.
orPATCH_WITH_TRA traName list BEGIN patch list END Creates a new TRA scope copied from the surrounding scope, loads all traName files (variable substitution is done; the file can be inlined) and evaluates the patches. When PATCH_WITH_TRA exits, the new TRA scope is discarded, that is, all TRA changes made by PATCH_WITH_TRA or any of its enclosed patches are forgotten.
orPATCH_WITH_SCOPE BEGIN patch list END Creates a new variable scope copied from the surrounding scope and evaluates the patches inside the new scope. When PATCH_WITH_SCOPE exits, the new scope is discarded, all new variables defined inside the scope and all changes to existing variables are forgotten.
orSET_2DA_ENTRY value value value value The first value is the row, the second is the column and the third is the required column count. The entry on the given column of the given row is set to the fourth value, but only rows with at least as many columns as the required column count are considered. The fourth value, the new entry, is evaluated specially: if it can be evaluated like a value (e.g., ‘‘3+4’’) it will be evaluated and its integer result will be written as an ASCII string. Otherwise if it is a single string (that is not a variable in scope) that string will be written at the new value. See the SET_2DA_ENTRY tutorial for more information.
orSET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER string value value value Defines an change to a 2DA file to be made at some point in the future. The change is stored in variables derived from the first parameter, string. The first two values are the row and column of the 2DA table to be changed and the third value the new value of the 2DA entry. Use SET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW to flush the queued changes and update the 2DA table. If you use SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER together with READ_2DA_ENTRY_FORMER you must use different string variables for the two. See the SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER tutorial.
orSET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW string value Flush the changes to the 2DA table that have been queued by SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER. The first parameter, string, should be the same string you used for SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER. The second value is the required column count. Rows with fewer columns are disregarded. See the SET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW tutorial.
orPRETTY_PRINT_2DAIndents the 3rd line in the current file (which should be a 2da file).
orPRETTY_PRINT_2DA valueIndents the value’th line (counting from 0) in the current file (which should be a 2da file).
orINSERT_2DA_ROW value1 value2 String String (after variable substitution) will be inserted as a new line in the table. Value1 is the row count, value2 is the required column count. If row count is the same as the number of long enough lines in the file, then the line will be inserted at the end; if row count is lesser than the number of lines, it will be inserted just before the nth line in the original file (starting count from 0); finally, if row count is greater than the number of lines, the component will fail to install.
<<<<<<<< ~.../mymod-inlined/2dafile~
asd foo
a b c
d e f
g h i
>>>>>>>>
COPY ~.../mymod-inlined/2dafile~ ~.../mymod-inlined/2dafile~
INSERT_2DA_ROW 3 3 ~4 4 4~
INSERT_2DA_ROW 2 3 ~3 3 3~
INSERT_2DA_ROW 1 3 ~2 2 2~
INSERT_2DA_ROW 0 3 ~1 1 1~
will result in
asd foo
1 1 1
a b c
2 2 2
d e f
3 3 3
g h i
4 4 4
orREMOVE_2DA_ROW value1 value2 the Value1-th row from the 2da file containing at least value2 items will be removed.
orPATCH_READLN variable Waits for the user to provided an enter-terminated string and store it in variable. Said string will be stored and re-used during non-interactive reinstalls. See the READLN tutorial.
orPATCH_RANDOM_SEED value See RANDOM_SEED.
orADD_STORE_ITEM [ + ] itemName [ position ] charge1 charge2 charge3 flags stack [ unlimited ] Add the item itemName to the current STO file. An optional + signifies that the new instance of the item should overwrite any existing instance of the same item. The item’s number of charges are given by the respective charge argument, which must take the form of #integer or ( value ). The optional position argument must be one of AFTER String, BEFORE String, LAST, FIRST or AT value. AFTER will place the new item behind the item given by String. BEFORE will place the item before the item provided by String. LAST will place the new item after all existing items. FIRST will place the new item as the first item in the store. AT will place the new item at the position given by value, with the first item having position 0. If no position argument is given, ADD_STORE_ITEM defaults to FIRST. The argument flags must be a string consisting of one of none, identified, unstealable, stolen, identified&stolen or identified&unstealable. The argument stack sets the number of item the store carries in the stack and must take the form of #integer or ( value ). The optional argument unlimited should be one of the strings limited or unlimited and controls whether the store should carry an inexhaustible stack of the new item, or not. limited is the default behaviour. See the ADD_STORE_ITEM tutorial for more information.
orREMOVE_STORE_ITEM itmName list Remove the listed items from the current store. Does nothing if an item is not for sale. Multiple instances are removed.
orREAD_2DA_ENTRY value value value variable The first value is the row, the second is the column and the third is the required column count. The variable specified is set to the entry on the given column of the given row, but only column with at least as many columns as the required column count are considered. This is the reverse of SET_2DA_ENTRY.
orREAD_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW string value The contents of the 2DA table is read in one go into an array derived from the first parameter, string. The second parameter, value, is the required column count. Rows with fewer columns are disregarded. The parameter string is also used to set a variable named after string that is set to the number of rows in the 2DA table with the required number of columns. Retrieve values from the constructed array with READ_2DA_ENTRY_FORMER. If you use READ_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW together with SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER you must use different string variables for the two. See the READ_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW tutorial.
orREAD_2DA_ENTRY_FORMER string value value variable Retrieves values from an array constructed by READ_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW. The first parameter, string, is the name of the array. The following two values are the 2DA row and column from which to read the entry. The value of the 2DA entry is stored in the last parameter, variable. See the READ_2DA_ENTRY_FORMER tutorial.
orCOUNT_2DA_ROWS value variable The first value is the required column count. This command counts the number of rows in the current file (which should be a 2DA file) that have at least as many columns as the required column count and stores the result in the variable.
orCOUNT_2DA_COLS variable This command counts the number of columns in the current file (which should be a 2DA file) and stores the result in the variable.
orCOUNT_REGEXP_INSTANCES optcase optexact regexp variable This command counts the number of times regexp appears in the current file and stores the result in the variable. Variable substitution is performed on regexp prior to regexp handling (EG, if %var% = ~abc~, ~[%var%]~ is evaluated as ~[abc]~).
orLOOKUP_IDS_SYMBOL_OF_INT variable idsFile value The symbolic constant associated with value in idsFile (which may contain user variables) is stored in variable. If that doesn’t work, value is stored in variable. Example:
LOOKUP_IDS_SYMBOL_OF_INT foo ~spell~ 1101
SPRINT myfile "SPELL"
LOOKUP_IDS_SYMBOL_OF_INT bar ~%myfile%~ (0x44c + 1)
LOOKUP_IDS_SYMBOL_OF_INT baz ~spell~ 77777
Both foo and bar are CLERIC_BLESS while baz is 777777.
orCOMPILE_BAF_TO_BCSDEPRECATED. Use DECOMPILE_AND_PATCH instead.

The current file, which must be a valid BAF script, is compiled to a BCS. In general you should use the COMPILE TP2 Action instead, unless you are using other patch commands to modify the file under consideration.

orDECOMPILE_BCS_TO_BAFDEPRECATED. Use DECOMPILE_AND_PATCH instead.

The current file, which must be a valid BCS script, is decompiled to a BAF.

orDECOMPILE_DLG_TO_DDEPRECATED. Use DECOMPILE_AND_PATCH instead.

The current file, which must be a valid DLG file, is decompile to a textual D file (with string refs and no comments). Once you have a D file you can use other patch commands to change the actions and triggers around. You should use D actions (like REPLACE_ACTION_TEXT) instead whenever possible.

orCOMPILE_D_TO_DLGDEPRECATED. Use DECOMPILE_AND_PATCH instead.

The current file, which must be a valid D file that defines a single DLG file (via an obvious BEGIN action) is compiled to a DLG. Typically this is only used after a DECOMPILE_DLG_TO_D.

orDECOMPILE_AND_PATCH BEGIN patch list END Acts like
DECOMPILE_BCS_TO_BAF // or DLG_TO_D
  patch list
COMPILE_BAF_TO_BCS // or D_TO_DLG
except it enforces that the DECOMPILE is followed by the compile, can indiscriminately patch BCS and DLG files, and is guaranteed not to leave a decompiled file in the override (if decompiling, patching or recompiling fails, a warning is printed and the original version of the file is left in the override).
orREFACTOR_TRIGGER optcase optexact String String Works like REPLACE_TEXTUALLY, except that it only works on triggers (for both D and BAF files) and applies Boolean Algebra to ensure that the structure of the trigger is not broken (like REPLACE_TEXTUALLY would do if you are substituting one trigger with several and the matching trigger is inside an OR() block and/or negated).

Caveats:

  • this command is very slow, so you should use REPLACE_TEXTUALLY if you are substituting a trigger with another, as well as using IF to avoid calling this patch on script files that do not contain the trigger you are looking for.
  • the resulting file will have messed up whitespace, so remember that if you plan on using REPLACE_TEXTUALLY later (the file will work correctly in-game). Applying another (empty) DECOMPILE_AND_PATCH will fix this issue.
  • the searching regexp must match exactly against a single trigger (so REFACTOR_TRIGGER ~A() B()~ ~C()~ or REFACTOR_TRIGGER ~A(~ ~C() A(~ will not work). The substituting string can contain multiple triggers.
orREFACTOR_BAF_TRIGGER optcase optexact String String Synonym for REFACTOR_TRIGGER.
orREFACTOR_D_TRIGGER optcase optexact String String Synonym for REFACTOR_TRIGGER.
orREPLACE_EVALUATE optcase findRegexp BEGIN patch list END replaceRegexp For every instance of the regexp findRegexp found, the patch list is evaluated (with the variable MATCHi set to the ith matched group in findRegexp), variable substitution is performed on replaceRegexp, and then findRegexp is replaced by replaceRegexp. Note that REPLACE_EVALUATE defines up to 200 MATCHi variables, but that MATCH1 is normally the variable matching the first group in findRegexp. Due to details of the implementation, MATCH0 normally evaluates to the string matched by the whole of findRegexp. Any writes done by the patch list (e.g., SAY or WRITE_ASCII) are ignored: SET should be the main component of the patch list. For example:
COPY ~nice.baf~ ~mean.baf~
  REPLACE_EVALUATE
    ~Give(\([0-9]+\),\([0-9]+\))~
    BEGIN
      SET result = (MATCH1 + MATCH2) / 2
    END
    ~Take(%result%)~
This COPY TP2 Action would replace Give(10,20) with Take(15). optcase allows you to decide if the matching is case-sensitive or not. Matching is case-sensitive by default.
orADD_GAM_NPC npcCRE npcARE xCoord yCoord See the ADD_GAM_NPC tutorial for more information about this action, which is used when adding NPCs to Baldur’s Gate 1. BG2 mods should not use this command.
orADD_MAP_NOTE xCoord yCoord color String If the file currently being patched is an ARE area file, this patch command adds a map note to it. Valid colors include: gray, violent, green, orange, red, blue, darkblue, lightgray. Example:
COPY_EXISTING ~ar0202.are~ ~override/ar0202.are~
  ADD_MAP_NOTE #123 #777 ~violet~
  ~This is my new map note!  Yippee!~
Special thanks to Japh for coding this feature.
orADD_KNOWN_SPELL splName spellLevel spellType When applied to a CRE file, this patch causes the given spell to be known. Note that spellLevel counts from 0 (e.g., you should say #2 for a third-level Fireball). Possible values for spellType are priest, innate and wizard. Example:
COPY_EXISTING ~some.cre~ ~override/some.cre~
  ADD_KNOWN_SPELL ~SPPR314~ #2 ~priest~
  // Unholy Blight is now known as a 3rd level priest spell
Special thanks to Japh for coding this feature.
orADD_MEMORIZED_SPELL splName spellLevel spellType [ ( value ) ] When applied to a CRE file, this patch causes the given spell to be memorized one more time (or value times if specified). Note that spellLevel counts from 0 (e.g., you should say #2 for a third-level Fireball). Possible values for spellType are priest, innate and wizard. Example:
COPY_EXISTING ~some.cre~ ~override/some.cre~
  ADD_MEMORIZED_SPELL ~SPPR314~ #2 ~priest~ ( 5 )
  // Unholy Blight is now memorized five times as 3rd priest
orREMOVE_KNOWN_SPELL splName list When applied to a CRE file, this patch causes all of the listed spells to be removed. Example:
COPY_EXISTING ~aerie.cre~ ~override/aerie.cre~
  REMOVE_KNOWN_SPELL ~sppr101~ ~sppr102~
Special thanks to Japh for coding this feature.
orREMOVE_MEMORIZED_SPELL splName list When applied to a CRE file, this patch causes all of the listed spells to be removed from their memory. Example:
COPY_EXISTING ~aerie.cre~ ~override/aerie.cre~
  REMOVE_MEMORIZED_SPELL ~sppr101~ ~sppr102~
orSET_BG2_PROFICIENCY String value Removes all effects from the current CRE file that alter the proficiency specified by String (relative to Stats.ids). After that, if value is different from zero, add an effect to set said proficiency to value.
orADD_CRE_ITEM itmName charge1 charge2 charge3 flags slot [ EQUIP ] [ TWOHANDED ] [ NOMOVE ] Add the item itmName to the current CRE file, with the number of charges determined by charge1, charge2 and charge3, respectively. Each charge should be an integer, either in the form of #integer or ( value ). The argument flags must be a string consisting of one of none, identified, unstealable, stolen, undroppable, identified&stolen, identified&unstealable, identified&undroppable, unstealable&undroppable, stolen&undroppable, identified&stolen&undroppable, identified&unstealable&undroppable. The argument slot should be a whitespace-separated list of entries chosen from helmet, armor, shield, gloves, lring, rring, amulet, belt, boots, weapon1, weapon2, weapon3, weapon4, quiver1, quiver2, quiver3, quiver4, cloak, qitem1, qitem2, qitem3, inv1, inv2, inv3, inv4, inv5, inv6, inv7, inv8, inv9, inv10, inv11, inv12, inv13, inv14, inv15, inv16. On PST, there are the additional slots tattoo1, tattoo2, tattoo3, earring1, earring2, inv17, inv18, inv19 and inv20. On IWD2, there are the additional slots shield1, shield2, shield3, shield4, inv17, inv18, inv19, inv20, inv21, inv22, inv23 and inv24. ADD_CRE_ITEM will add the item to the first empty slot in the list. If no slot is empty, the item will be placed in the first slot in the list and the item that previously occupied the slot will be moved to the general inventory. If the general inventory is full, the moved item will be discarded. Additionally, slot may contain one or more entries chosen from inv, qitem, quiver, weapon, ring. These entries unfold to the full range of corresponding slots. For example, qitem unfolds to qitem1, qitem2 and qitem3. On PST, you may additionally use tattoo and earring. On IWD2, you may additionally use shield. The optional argument EQUIP only applies to the weapon slots only and will make the creature have the weapon selected. The optional argument TWOHANDED also only applies to weapon slots and will cause items in the shield slot to be unequipped. The optional argument NOMOVE will cause the new item to be added to the specified slot(s) only if there is an empty slot, otherwise the new item is placed in the inventory. See the ADD_CRE_ITEM tutorial.
orREPLACE_CRE_ITEM itmName #charge1 #charge2 #charge3 flags slot [ EQUIP ] [ TWOHANDED ] If there’s an item in the slot position, replace it; otherwise, process ADD_CRE_ITEM
orREMOVE_CRE_ITEM itmName list Remove the listed items from the current creature. Does nothing if an item is not possessed. Multiple instances are removed.
orREMOVE_CRE_ITEMS Remove all items from the current creature.
orREMOVE_CRE_EFFECTS Remove all effects from the current creature.
orREMOVE_KNOWN_SPELLS Remove all known spells from the current creature.
orREMOVE_MEMORIZED_SPELLS Remove all memorized spells from the current creature.
orPATCH_SILENTmakes WeiDU skip all messages; it’s reenabled once a component is installed (or fails to), or a PRINT, PATCH_PRINT, VERBOSE or PATCH_VERBOSE is found.
orPATCH_VERBOSEundoes the latest SILENT or PATCH_SILENT command.
orINNER_PATCH buffString BEGIN patch list END Any WeiDU variables inside %s within buffString are replaced by their values. All of the patches given are evaluated as if the contents of the current file were buffString. Any modifications to buffString are thrown away (making this mostly useful for reads). Example:
INNER_PATCH "ABC" BEGIN
  READ_BYTE 0x2 "myvar"
END
PATCH_PRINT "myvar is %myvar%"
This sequence will always print myvar is 67 (since 67 is the ASCII code for C).
orINNER_PATCH_SAVE savevar buffString BEGIN patch list END As with INNER_PATCH, except that any modifications to buffString are stored inside savevar. Example:
SPRINT foo "ABC"
INNER_PATCH_SAVE bar "%foo%" BEGIN
  WRITE_BYTE 0x2 65
END
PATCH_PRINT "foo is %foo%, bar is %bar%"
This sequence will always print foo is ABC, bar is ABA (since 65 is the ASCII code for A).
orINNER_PATCH_FILE resource BEGIN patch list END Any WeiDU variables inside %s within resource are replaced by their values. If the resulting resource is present in the game or in the override folder, the patches given are evaluated as if the current file were that resource. If not, nothing happens. Any modifications to that resource are thrown away (making this mostly useful for reads). Example:
INNER_PATCH_FILE "SW1H01.ITM" BEGIN
  READ_BYTE 0x1 "myvar"
END
PATCH_PRINT "myvar is %myvar%"
This sequence will always print myvar is 84 (since 84 is the ASCII code for T and SW1H01.ITM starts with ITM).
orINNER_ACTION BEGIN TP2 Action list END See the INNER_ACTION tutorial, but loosely the current COPY is paused, the given TP2 Actions are executed, and then the current COPY is resumed. Note that an INNER_ACTION should never modify a file that is being modified by the current action. For example, never put APPEND  foo.2da  inside of COPY_EXISTING  foo.2da . More formally, if the inner action and the outer action both modify the same file, the results are undefined.
orEDIT_SAV_FILE level [ ADD_IF_MISSING ] [ filename list ] BEGIN TP2 Patch list END The current file should be a SAV file. EDIT_SAV_FILE will iterate over the files contained within the SAV file, set the variable SAV_FILE to the name of the current file and evaluate the patch list against the decompressed contents of SAV_FILE. The file contents are then recompressed into the SAV file using the specified compression level. level can be 0 to 9, where 0 means no compression, 1 is the fastest compression and 9 is the best compression.

If the list of filenames is non-empty, only files whose name appear in that list are patched (the comparison is case-insensitive, variables and arrays are parsed if using EVALUATE_BUFFER or AUTO_EVAL_STRINGS). If the optional ADD_IF_MISSING is provided, the file will be loaded if it exists (determined with FILE_EXISTS_IN_GAME) and the patches are applied. If the file does not exist, the patches will instead be applied to the empty buffer. The resulting file is added to the SAV itself.

orDECOMPRESS_REPLACE_FILE start length uncompressedlength Decompress (ZLIB) the start...start+length-1 portion of the current file (requires to specify the uncompressed length as well). The result overwrites the current file. It’s equivalent to DECOMPRESS_INTO_FILE start length uncompressedlength 0 BUFFER_LENGTH
orDECOMPRESS_INTO_FILE start length uncompressedlength overwritefrom overwriteto Decompress (ZLIB) the start...start+length-1 portion of the current file (requires to specify the uncompressed length as well). The result overwrites the overwritefrom...overwriteto-1 portion of the current file.
orDECOMPRESS_INTO_VAR start length uncompressedlength varName Decompress (ZLIB) the start...start+length-1 portion of the current file (requires to specify the uncompressed length as well). The result is stored into varName.
orCOMPRESS_REPLACE_FILE start length level Compress (ZLIB) the start...start+length-1 portion of the current file (level is 0 to 9; 0 means don’t compress, 1 is fastest compression, 9 is best compression). The result overwrites the current file. It’s equivalent to DECOMPRESS_INTO_FILE start length uncompressedlength 0 BUFFER_LENGTH
orCOMPRESS_INTO_FILE start length level overwritefrom overwriteto Compress (ZLIB) the start...start+length-1 portion of the current file (level is 0 to 9; 0 means don’t compress, 1 is fastest compression, 9 is best compression). The result overwrites the overwritefrom...overwriteto-1 portion of the current file.
orCOMPRESS_INTO_VAR start length level varName Compress (ZLIB) the start...start+length-1 portion of the current file (level is 0 to 9; 0 means don’t compress, 1 is fastest compression, 9 is best compression). The result is stored into varName.
orLAUNCH_PATCH_MACRO String Launch a patch macro. Refer to the macros section for additional information. You may use LPM as a synonym for LAUNCH_PATCH_MACRO.
orLAUNCH_PATCH_FUNCTION String [ INT_VAR variable [ = value ] ... ] [ STR_VAR variable [ = [ EVALUATE_BUFFER ] String ] ... ] [ RET variable [ = String ] ... ] END Launch a patch function. Refer to the Functions section for additional information. You may use LPF as a synonym for LAUNCH_PATCH_FUNCTION.
 
when A when clause gives you local control over when a COPY, COPY_EXISTING or APPEND_COL happens. If the COPY or COPY_EXISTING contains multiple files, each one is checked against the when clauses separately.
isIF_SIZE_IS fileSizeTrue if the input file size is fileSize. You may use I_S_I as a synonym for IF_SIZE_IS.
orIF regexpTrue if the input file contains regexp.
orUNLESS regexpFalse if the input file contains regexp.
orBUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGESTrue only if the file is actually changed by patching actions. Unlike all other when clauses, this one is evaluated just before the result would be written out to the disk. You may use BUT_ONLY as a synonym for BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES.
orIF_EXISTS True only if the file exists. For COPY, this check is done with FILE_EXISTS. For COPY_EXISTING, COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP, COPY_RANDOM, APPEND and APPEND_COL this check is done with FILE_EXISTS_IN_GAME. For COPY_ALL_GAM_FILES, this when clause is redundant.
 
offset A offset is a normal value.
 
value An expression that evaluates to an integer. See --debug-value.
isintegerAn absolute location or amount. You may format your numbers in decimal, hex, octal or binary. Use 0x for hex, 0o for octal and 0b for binary.
or( value ) 
orvalue + valueAddition.
orvalue - valueSubtraction.
orvalue * valueMultiplication.
orvalue / valueDivision. Division by zero yields the value zero. Briefly, fractions are dropped and the result is an integer (so 11 / 6 = 1). More technically, “this division rounds the real quotient of its arguments towards zero” -- see http://caml.inria.fr/pub/docs/manual-ocaml/libref/Pervasives.html for more information.
orvalue MODULO valueAn operation that returns the remainder of a division between two numbers. If the second value is 0, the returned value is 0. You may use REM as a synonym.
orBYTE_AT offset The 8-bit value from the file at the given offset.
orSBYTE_AT offset The 8-bit signed value from the file at the given offset.
orSHORT_AT offset The 16-bit value from the file at the given offset.
orSSHORT_AT offset The 16-bit signed value from the file at the given offset.
orLONG_AT offset The 32-bit value from the file at the given offset.
orSLONG_AT offset The 32-bit signed value from the file at the given offset.
orvalue ** valueExponentiation. The first value is raised to the power of the second. This is done by converting both to floating point numbers, calculating the exponent, and converting the answer back to a 32-bit integer. If anything goes wrong the value zero is returned or the result is undefined.
orvalue ** ( value value ) Fractional exponentiation. a ** (b c) yields a raised to the power of (b/c). All of the internal operations are done in floating point. If anything goes wrong, zero is returned or the result is undefined. Example:
SET x = 100 ** 2
SET y = 100 ** (1 2) // square root of 100 = 10
SET z = 100 ** (1 3) // cube root of 100 = 4.64
PATCH_PRINT "w = %w%, x = %x%, y = %y%, z = %z%"
yields x = 10000, y = 10, z = 4.
orvalue = valueInteger Equality. If the two values evaluate to equal integers, the result is 1. Otherwise, the result is 0. See STRING_COMPARE for comparing Strings. Synonym: ==.
orNOT valueNegation. If the value is 0, the result is 1. Otherwise the result is 0.
orABS ValueAbsolute value. If the value is >= 0, the result is x. Otherwise the result is -x.
orvalue != valueInteger Inequality. If the two values evaluate to equal integers, the result is 0. Otherwise the result is 1. See STRING_COMPARE for comparing Strings.
orvalue OR valueDisjunction. If either value is non-zero, the result is 1. Otherwise, the result is 0. Synonym: ||.
orvalue AND valueConjunction. If both values are non-zero, the result is 1. Otherwise, the result is 0. Synonym: &&.
orvalue BAND valueBitwise And. 0b101 BAND 0b110 = 0b100. Synonym: &.
orvalue BOR valueBitwise Or. 0b101 BOR 0b110 = 0b111. Synonym: |.
orvalue BXOR valueBitwise Exclusive Or. 0b101 BXOR 0b110 = 0b011. Synonym: ^^.
orBNOT valueBitwise Not. BNOT 0b111 = 0b1111111111111111111111111111000. Synonym: `.
orvalue BLSL valueBitwise Logical Shift Left. 0b101 BLSL 2 = 0b10100. Synonym: <<.
orvalue BLSR valueBitwise Logical Shift Right. 0b101 BLSR 2 = 0b1. Synonym: >>.
orvalue BASR valueBitwise Arithmetic Shift Right. This is an arithmetic shift: the sign bit of the first value is replicated and inserted in the vacated bits. 0b101 BASR 2 = 0b1.
orvalue > valueIf the first value is greater than the second, the result is 1. Otherwise, the result is 0.
orvalue >= valueIf the first value is greater than or equal to the second, the result is 1. Otherwise, the result is 0.
orvalue < valueIf the first value is less than the second, the result is 1. Otherwise, the result is 0.
orvalue <= valueIf the first value is less than or equal to the second, the result is 1. Otherwise, the result is 0.
orvalue ? value : valueAn expression-valued conditional. If the first value is not 0 then the second value is evaluated and returned, otherwise the third value is evaluated and returned.
orString STRING_COMPARE StringThis is legacy syntax for STRING_EQUAL: This expression evaluates to 0 if and only if its two string arguments are equal (have the same length and the same contents). Otherwise it will evaluate to a negative or positive integer, depending on whether the first string argument would sort lexicographically before or after the second string argument. variables within the strings (e.g., “%mykit%”) are replaced by their values. Note that variables that you want expanded must be put in %’s, otherwise the raw text will be used. You may use STR_CMP as a synonym for STRING_COMPARE. This function works just like C’s strcmp. Note also that STRING_EQUAL and STRING_COMPARE are similar, but STRING_EQUAL has more intuitive return values.
orString STRING_COMPARE_CASE StringThis is legacy syntax for STRING_EQUAL_CASE: As STRING_COMPARE, but the comparison ignores case. That is, "ANOMEN" and "aNoMeN" are considered equal.
orString STRING_EQUAL StringThis expression evaluates to 1 if and only if its two string arguments are equal (have the same length and the same contents), otherwise it values to 0. variables within the strings (e.g., “%mykit%”) are replaced by their values. Note that variables that you want expanded must be put in %’s, otherwise the raw text will be used. Note also that STRING_EQUAL and STRING_COMPARE are similar, but STRING_EQUAL has more intuitive return values.
orString STRING_EQUAL_CASE StringAs STRING_EQUAL, but the comparison ignores case. That is, "ANOMEN" and "aNoMeN" are considered equal. You may use STR_EQ as a synonym for STRING_EQUAL_CASE.
orString STRING_MATCHES_REGEXP StringAs STRING_COMPARE_CASE, but the second string is treated as a regexp. Thus "AR1005" STRING_MATCHES_REGEXP "AR[0-9]+" evaluates to 0 (“no difference”). You may use STRING_COMPARE_REGEXP as a synonym.
orString STRING_CONTAINS_REGEXP StringAs STRING_MATCHES_REGEXP, but it evaluates to 0 if the first string contains the second regexp. Thus "AR1005" STRING_CONTAINS_REGEXP "[w-z]" evaluates to 1 (“mismatch”).

Be warned that this does the exact opposite of what the name suggests.

orGAME_IS StringReturns true if the IE game variant is one of the entries in String, otherwise it returns false. String is a list of whitespace-separated entries, chosen from (case doesn’t matter) bg2=soa, tob, iwd2, pst, bg1, totsc, iwd=iwd1, how, totlm, tutu, tutu_totsc, bgt, ca, iwd_in_bg2, bgee, bg2ee, eet, iwdee, pstee. In the list, bg2=soa means that bg2 and soa are synonyms, and you can use whichever one you like. Please note that the items in the list are defined to be mutually exclusive (except tob will detect both plain ToB and ToB with BGT installed, for legacy purposes), so bg2 will detect a SoA-only game, without either ToB or Tutu installed. As such, a mod which is usable with any flavor of BG2 and any flavor of Tutu or BG: EE would contain REQUIRE_PREDICATE GAME_IS ~bg2 tob tutu tutu_totsc bgee bg2ee~ .
orENGINE_IS StringFunctions like GAME_IS except bg2=soa will detect SoA-based Tutu games in addition to SoA games, and tob will detect ToB-based Tutu games in addition to ToB and BGT games. As such, a mod that requires Throne of Bhaal’s engine enhancements could use REQUIRE_PREDICATE ENGINE_IS ~tob~ .
orGAME_INCLUDES String Returns true if the IE game variant includes the game content specified by String. String is a single game chosen from bg1, totsc, bg2=soa, tob, pst, iwd=iwd1, how, totlm, iwd2, ca, sod. In the list, bg2=soa means that bg2 and soa are synonyms, and you can use whichever one you like. Please note that unlike GAME_IS you only specify a single game, rather than a list of games. As an example, GAME_INCLUDES ~tob~ will return true for any game which includes the ToB content, such as ToB itself, BGT or BG2EE.
orIDS_OF_SYMBOL ( File String )Will return the number associated with String in File.ids, or -1 if String is not associated in File.ids.
orVARIABLE_IS_SET StringReturns true if the variable String is set (there’s a variable called either String or %String%, regardless of whether it is a string or an integer).
orIS_AN_INT StringReturns true if the variable String is set to an integer (there’s a variable called either String or %String% with integer value).
orTRA_ENTRY_EXISTS ( String String list ) returns true if the variable String maps to a valid TRA entry. If the String list is empty the tra entry is looked for into the loaded TRAs, otherwise it’s looked for into the listed TRA files.
orIS_SILENTReturns true if the output is currently silenced, false otherwise.
orMOD_IS_INSTALLED modTp2Name modComponentReturns true if the modComponent of modTp2Name is installed. The syntax is the same as with REQUIRE_COMPONENT.
orINSTALL_ORDER modTp2Name1 modComponent1 AFTER modTp2Name2 modComponent2Returns true if the modComponent1 of modTp2Name1 is installed after the modComponent2 of modTp2Name2 (and both components are installed). The syntax is the same as with REQUIRE_COMPONENT.
orINSTALL_ORDER modTp2Name1 modComponent1 BEFORE modTp2Name2 modComponent2Returns true if the modComponent1 of modTp2Name1 is installed before the modComponent2 of modTp2Name2 (and both components are installed). The syntax is the same as with REQUIRE_COMPONENT.
orID_OF_LABEL modTp2Name String Returns the numerical identifier (component number) of the component in modTp2Name which has the given LABEL. Returns -231 if no such tp2 exists, said tp2 has no component with that LABEL, or two or more components have that LABEL. In the last two cases will print a WARNING.
orSTATE_WHICH_SAYS text FROM String String must be an in-game or in-override .dlg file. Returns:
  1. Fails the installation if it can’t evaluate the text (an @x reference out of bounds)
  2. -3 if the text is not currently in the tlk or in the list of strings to add
  3. -2 if the text is spoken (= SAY ~Foo~) at least twice in the file String
  4. -1 if the text is never spoken in the file String
Otherwise it returns the number of the state in which text is spoken in the file String. @x references are taken from the loaded TRA files (the ones defined in the Language part).
orSTATE_WHICH_SAYS value IN String1 FROM String2 As above, except that @x references are taken from the String1 tra file. In particular, one %s in String1 is expanded to the list of directories; for example (as of Sola v102), solarom/%s/epilogue.tra would match
    solarom/american/epilogue.tra
    solarom/french/epilogue.tra
    solarom/german/epilogue.tra
    solarom/italian/epilogue.tra
    solarom/polski/epilogue.tra
    solarom/portuguese/epilogue.tra
    solarom/russian/epilogue.tra
orRESOLVE_STR_REF ( text )Resolves the given text (adding it to the tlk), and returns its TLK index (so you can pass the result of this command to a function which then uses WRITE_LONG rather than SAY).
orNEXT_STRREFReturns the next available string reference in the TLK file.
orRANDOM ( value value )A random-number generator. The first value is the lower bound, the second value is the upper bound. A random integer between the lower bound and the upper bound (inclusive) is returned. Thus RANDOM(3 5) can return 3, 4 or 5. If the lower bound is greater than the upper bound, zero is returned. See also RANDOM_SEED.
orBUFFER_LENGTHReturns the length of the string currently being patched, or 0 if outside of a patch expression.
orINDEX ( optcase optexact string1 string2 [ value ] )Returns the index of the first regexp match of string1 inside string2, or -1 if not found. If provided, value specifies from what point of string2 the searching should begin (instead of 0).
orRINDEX ( optcase optexact string1 string2 [ value ] )Returns the index of the last regexp match of string1 inside string2, or -1 if not found. If provided, value specifies from what point of string2 the searching should begin (instead of STRING_LENGTH string2).
orINDEX_BUFFER ( optcase optexact string [ value ] )Returns the index of the first regexp match of string inside the current string, or -1 if not found. If provided, value specifies from what point of the string the searching should begin (instead of 0).
orRINDEX_BUFFER ( optcase optexact string [ value ] )Returns the index of the last regexp match of string inside the current string, or -1 if not found. If provided, value specifies from what point of the string the searching should begin (instead of BUFFER_LENGTH).
orSTRING_LENGTH StringReturns the length of the argument String (after variable evaluation).
orFILE_CONTAINS fileName regexpEvaluates to 1 if the file fileName contains the regular expression regexp and 0 otherwise. Case is ignored.
orFILE_CONTAINS_EVALUATED ( fileName varsRegexp ) First, all WeiDU variables enclosed in %s in varsRegexp and fileName are substituted. The expression is 1 if the resulting regexp occurs in fileName and 0 otherwise. If fileName does not exist or has size 0, the result is 0. The comparison ignores case. See also FILE_CONTAINS. Example:
COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP ~.*\.CRE~ ~override~
  READ_BYTE   0x273 class
  READ_ASCII  0x280 deathvar
  PATCH_IF (class = 14) AND // class 14 = CLERIC_MAGE
           (NOT FILE_CONTAINS_EVALUATED(~pdialog.2da~
                                        ~%deathvar%~))
    THEN BEGIN
      ADD_CRE_ITEM ~POTN08~ #10 #10 #10 ~IDENTIFIED~ ~INV15~
    END
  BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES
The example gives ten healing potions to all cleric-mages who cannot join the party. Notably it excludes Aerie since she has the death variable Aerie and pdialog.2da contains AERIE.
isFILE_EXISTS fileNameEvaluates to 1 if the file exists in the filesystem (or the bif file is referenced inside the chitin.key) and evaluates to 0 otherwise. The results of FILE_EXISTS are undefined if fileName is a directory.
orDIRECTORY_EXISTS dirNameEvaluates to 1 if dirName is a directory and exists in the filesystem and evaluates to 0 otherwise.
orFILE_EXISTS_IN_GAME fileNameEvaluates to 1 if the file exists as a game resource and has non-zero size. Evaluates to 0 otherwise. BIFFs and the override directory are searched in the standard manner. Evaluates to 0 for a file that does not exist but has been ALLOW_MISSING’d.
orFILE_MD5 fileName md5sumEvaluates to 1 if the file exists and has the given MD5 checksum. Evaluates to 0 otherwise. Two different files are exceptionally unlikely to have the same MD5 checksum. In any event, the discovered checksum is printed to the log. If the file does not exist, it evaluates to 0.
orFILE_IS_IN_COMPRESSED_BIFF fileNameEvaluates to 1 if the file is stored in a compressed biff (ignoring copies in the override). Evaluates to 0 otherwise (the file is not in a biff, or it is in an uncompressed biff).
orBIFF_IS_COMPRESSED fileNameEvaluates to 1 if the file is a compressed biff. Evaluates to 0 otherwise.

FileName must match against the contents of what is stored in chitin.key (similar to how command-line arguments that touch bif files work). For example, data/AREA000A.bif. Notably, SOURCE_BIFF outputs file names compatible with this command.

orFILE_SIZE fileName fileSizeEvaluates to 1 if the size of the file fileName is exactly fileSize. Evaluates to 0 otherwise.
orSIZE_OF_FILE fileNameReturns the size of fileName or -1 if the file does not exist. Variables in fileName are evaluated. fileName can be a file on the local file system or an inlined file.
or%variable% The value of the variable is used.
orEVALUATE_BUFFER variable User variables inside the given string are evaluated one additional time. You may prepend EVALUATE_BUFFER when a value is called for and you would normally use a string. You may also use it for SET and SPRINT statements. Example:
SPRINT x ~y~
SET y = 5
SPRINT z EVALUATE_BUFFER ~tricky %%x%%~
SET EVALUATE_BUFFER "%x%" += 77
PATCH_PRINT "y is %y% ; z is %z%"
This prints out y is 82 ; z is tricky 5. You may also do hackery like FILE_SIZE "myfile" "%%indirection%%". Be very careful with this feature.
or$array(index list) The so-called array construct. See the tutorial.
or%WEIDU_ARCH%The special variable WEIDU_ARCH is set to either "x86", "amd64" or "mac" at WeiDU startup and can be used to determine the architecture of the WeiDU binary.
or%WEIDU_OS%The special variable WEIDU_OS is set to either "win32" or "osx" or "unix" at WeiDU startup and can be used to determine the operating system for which the WeiDU binary was compiled.
or%COMPONENT_NUMBER%The special variable COMPONENT_NUMBER is set to the number of the component being installed.
or%INTERACTIVE%The special variable INTERACTIVE is set to 1 if the install is being done interactively (IE you launched setup-mymod.exe and you’re installing mymod), or is set to 0 if the install is being done non-interactively (IE you launched setup-mymod.exe and now weidu is reinstalling othermod due to the domino uninstall and reinstall).
orvariable The value of the variable is used. In a patch value, you may use either %myvar% or myvar to get the value of a variable, provided that your variable’s name is not the same as a WeiDU syntactic keyword or known constant. Also note that while it is common to “call out” variables by putting quotation marks around them, this is not necessary if the variable is unambiguous. Thus the following three patches are all equivalent:
SET "x" = "%y%" + "%z%"       // these all
SET "x" = "y" + "z"           //    do the
SET x = y + z                 //  same thing
orNAME1The offset within an infinity engine resource where the unidentified general name (e.g., "Battle Axe") is stored.
orNAME2The offset within an infinity engine resource where the identified general name (e.g., "K’logarath +4") is stored.
orUNIDENTIFIED_DESCThe offset within an infinity engine resource where the unidentified description (e.g., "The hand axe or throwing axe is also known as a hatchet ...") is stored.
orIDENTIFIED_DESCAs above ... ("Clans have gone to war to possess K’log...")
orBIOAs above ... NPC Biography
or...Almost everything in SNDSLOT.IDS or SOUNDOFF.IDS works as well.
 
variable A variable is a textual name that holds a value. Variables are usually set with READ_BYTE, SET or SPRINT.
isStringYou may name the variable whatever you like, but stay away from the special characters used in regexps. When you want to obtain the value of a variable, enclose it in %s.

Example: If a file contains the two binary integers 33 and 77, then after executing:

READ_LONG   0 ~myvar~
WRITE_LONG  4 ( ~%myvar%~ + 11 )

The file will contain the two binary integers 33 and 44.

10  WeiDU TP2 Tutorials

Note: it’s advised to read these tutorials in the order they were written, as often a tutorial depends on contents explained in the tutorials before it. If the tutorial-writer is kind enough, they’ll state dependencies while introducing the subject.

10.1  COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP (Last update: v232)

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Japheth and edited by Wisp to conform to contemporary good practices.

The purpose of COPY_EXISTING and COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP is to patch a file for patching. It will grab the file out of the BIFFs, or if an override version exists, it will grab it out of the override folder.

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP, EXTEND_BOTTOM_REGEXP and EXTEND_TOP_REGEXP can be potentially powerful actions if you need to make some changes to a certain set of files all in one shot.

Consider this example for COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP:

In my mod I want to make it so that all 1-handed swords only do D6 damage, rather than the varying damages they do in SOA. To do this with the "normal" COPY_EXISTING, I would have to write out all the one handed swords like this:

COPY_EXISTING ~sw1h01.itm~ ~override~
              ~sw1h02.itm~ ~override~
              etc...

That could take a lot of time to do. Using COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP I can minimize writing 70+ lines of code into 3 lines of code. Take a look at this:

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP ~sw1h..[^abc].*itm~ ~override~
  //our patching code goes here

I’ll explain how the regexp wildcards in the above example work: I want to avoid copying over the files sw1h54a.itm, sw1h54b.itm and sw1h54c.itm because they are the three components that make up the Equalizer and are thus not actual swords. The regexp fragment [^abc] is an exclusion set that will match any character but “a”, “b” and “c”.

10.2  EXTEND_TOP_REGEXP

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Japheth.

Let’s take this situation that I was in:

I am making a Hirelings mod, and in order to get non-party NPC’s to transition from area to area, I needed to make use of a combination of MakeGlobal(), InMyArea(O:Object*) and MoveGlobalObject(O:Object*,O:Target*).

I originally put the script that moves them from area to area into baldur.bcs (this script is constantly running in the game), but for some strange reason, the cre’s wouldn’t move to smaller areas, only the large "main" areas. (Like The Docks, Temple District, Slums, etc.) So I figured, "Huh, guess I’m going to have to put the script in every area script". (Area scripts are scripts that are assigned to areas that are ran while you are in the area. Pretty obvious, right?)

Now, writing the code to EXTEND_TOP this little script into every area script would of taken quite a while, and well, rather than do that, I humbly requested Wes to implement the regexp feature of EXTEND_TOP and EXTEND_BOTTOM, and Westley obliged. (My penance for that request is writing the docs you are reading right now.)

So now with Wes’ help, I could EXTEND_TOP to every area in 1 fell swoop. If you were to open up NI and expand the BCS tree, you would see a whole crapload of scripts that begin with the prefix AR. These are the area scripts I mentioned before. They go from AR0014 to AR6400. So now, using regexp, here is how you would extend the script to the top of every area script:

EXTEND_TOP_REGEXP ~ar[0-6].*bcs~ ~pathtoscript/patch.bcs~

So there we are, instead of 100+ lines of code, I minimized it to 1 lines. Now, if you are understanding regexp at all, you probably are going “Hey wait, why didn’t you just go EXTEND_TOP_REGEXP "ar.*bcs" "pathtoscript/patch.bcs" ?” Well, in fact, I did do that at first, but I forgot to account that there are other “normal” scripts that begin with AR. So, I had to write it so that the regexp had the number after the initial AR so that WeiDU would know only to patch the script to area files.

10.3  READ_BYTE and PATCH_IF (Last update: v232)

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Japheth, and shamelessly edited by Bigg to use PATCH_IF rather than IF_EVAL. It was then further edited by Wisp to conform to contemporary good practices.

READ_BYTE, READ_SHORT and READ_LONG can be potentially powerful functions when used in conjunction with PATCH_IF.

Here’s a brief demonstration.

The scenario: I want to make all longswords require 10 strength, rather than their normal 6. To do that manually would be a pain, so why not use the great feature of READ_BYTE/LONG/SHORT?

Here’s how it’s done.

First of all, we need to copy all the items so they are ready to be patched. Here’s how we do that:

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP ~.*\.itm~ ~override~

All this does is copy all files with a .itm extension to the override folder.

Next, we read the value of the item-type offset into a variable. We’ll use the variable name "type".

READ_SHORT 0x1c type

I found the offset by looking at the file format for items in the IESDP: http://gibberlings3.net/iesdp/. The variable "type" can really be anything, it’s just what I’ve chosen.

We should edit the item only if the item is really a longsword:

PATCH_IF (type = 0x14) BEGIN

0x14 is just the value for longsword. If you look at the item-type offset (which is 0x1c) in the IESDP, you will see a link to a list of known values. 0x14 is the value for large/long swords.

Now that we’re done reading that into a variable and doing the checks, we can now WRITE_BYTE the value we want to give our new longswords. That is, a strength requirement of 10.

WRITE_BYTE 0x26 10

0x26 is the offset for required strength. Again, I found this offset by referring to the IESDP beforehand.

END
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

Finally, we close the BEGIN that was after PATCH_IF and tell WeiDU not to copy the item if it didn’t change (IE, if it wasn’t a long sword).

So, to loop through the logic again, this is what we’re saying:

If the category is longsword, set the required strength to 10. If there are no changes, ignore the file and don’t copy it over.

And that’s it. Now all items with the category Longsword will have a required strength of 10. Pretty neat, eh? Obviously you can do many, many other types of thing with these functions. So go ahead and experiment.

Here’s the full code:

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP ~.*\.itm~ ~override~
  READ_SHORT 0x1c type

  PATCH_IF (type = 0x14) BEGIN
    WRITE_BYTE 0x26 10
  END
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

Oh yeah, and if you’re going "But I don’t know when to READ_SHORT or WRITE_LONG. It’s so confusing," don’t worry, cause it kind of is if you’ve never worked with bytes before. Here’s a very brief synopsis.

Use READ/WRITE_SHORT for anything that is two bytes. You can determine this easily by looking at the field you want to change in the IESDP or the program Near Infinity and subtracting the next listed field’s offset from the offset of the field you want to change.

For example, if I wanted to change Bodhi’s Max HP here’s what I would do. First look at her creature file in NI. (She has many, but for the sake of argument, we’ll use bodhi.cre). If you look at the Max HP field, it says it’s offset is 26h. The next field in the creature file is Animation ID, which is 28h. So, subtracting 28h from 26h gives you 2h. The perfect WRITE_SHORT size.

Use READ/WRITE_LONG for anything that is 4 bytes. Use the above example to figure this out as well.

Use READ/WRITE_BYTE for anything that is one byte. Again, use the above example to figure this out.

Use WRITE_ASCII for things like script name, dialogues, scripts, etc. Note, that if you’re WRITE_ASCIIing to say, the script name, and the previous script-name entry is longer than the one you’re writing, then you’ll have spillover after WRITE_ASCII. To avoid this, specify a required size that equals the length of the script-name field. So, if I have

WRITE_ASCII 0x280 ~Guy~

I would actually want to write this

WRITE_ASCII 0x280 ~Guy~ #32

These are by no means "hard and fast" rules, but generally they ring true.

Also, if you tried to run the template, you’d have noticed that it didn’t work correctly. That’s because there are some corrupt files in the key (that is, files of size 0). To avoid that, WeiDU gives us the SOURCE_SIZE variable, which is set to the original file size, in number of bytes. We can simply check that the file is large enough. Using either NI or the IESDP, we see that a basic itm file must be least 0x72 bytes long, so we can check that before doing anything:

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP ~.*\.itm~ ~override~
  PATCH_IF (SOURCE_SIZE > 0x71) BEGIN
    READ_SHORT 0x1c type

    PATCH_IF (type = 0x14) BEGIN
      WRITE_BYTE 0x26 10
    END
  END
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

Again, we instruct WeiDU to not do a thing if the file is not large enough.

And that, as they say, is that.

10.4  values and expressions (Last update: v232)

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Japheth, and shamelessly edited by Bigg to use PATCH_IF rather than IF_EVAL. It was then further edited by Wisp to conform to contemporary good practices.

Note well: This tutorial can be considered an example of how to use WeiDU’s low-level functionality. The preferred way of accomplishing the task in this tutorial (adding items to creatures) is with ADD_CRE_ITEM. Many other things can and should today also be done with higher-level functionality.

Using expressions with WeiDU can get quite complex, however the power they give you is more than worth the effort in learning how to use them.

Say, for instance, that you want to give a creature file a shield that doesn’t have one originally. The old way to do this would be to add the item to the creature file using Near Infinity or ShadowKeeper and then copy that creature file over upon installation of your mod. However, now that INSERT/DELETE_BYTES and READ/WRITE_BYTE/LONG/SHORT take expressions, we can do this "on the fly" when installing your mod.

The benefits of doing it this way should be obvious. Now you no longer have to overwrite someone else’s modifications to that creature file. You can simply add your shield and leave their modifications intact. (Unless of course *they* also decided to give the exact same creature a shield. And if that’s the case, the shield you specify won’t be used because of our PATCH_IF statement.)

Anyways, on to the example. I’ll use acolyte1.cre as my example creature.

Caveat: This will only work on standard-ordered creature files, for which

known_spells_offset <=
memorization_offset <=
memorized_spells_offset <=
effects_offset <=
items_offset <=
item_slots_offset

The first thing we want to do is copy the creature over so it’s ready for patching, and ensure it isn’t corrupt. That’s easy to do using a simple COPY_EXISTING statement:

COPY_EXISTING ~acolyte1.cre~ ~override~
  PATCH_IF (SOURCE_SIZE > 0x2d3) BEGIN

Next, we need to read in the offsets so we know where to insert our bytes and where to update our number of items. I figured out these offsets by simply viewing the creature file in Near Infinity.

The offsets we need to read in are the item slots offset, the items offset and the number of items. This is how we do it:

READ_LONG 0x2bc itemsoffset
READ_LONG 0x2b8 itemslot
READ_LONG 0x2c0 numberofitems

"itemsoffset", "itemslot" and "numberofitems" can be anything you choose, but I would name them something that’s easy to remember because we’ll be using them later.

Next, we’re going to read in the shield slot to make sure that it’s empty. We do this by taking the "itemslot" variable and adding 0x04 to it which we know is always going to be the shield slot. (You can verify this by looking at a creature file in NI. If you look at the offset 0x2b8 it will have the offset for item slots. If you add 0x04 to that number, it should equal the offset for the shield slot.)

This is done like so:

READ_SSHORT (itemslot + 0x04) shield

We want to tell WeiDU only to do this if the shield slot is *empty*. This is where PATCH_IF comes in handy. The way a creature file is setup is that if a slot is set to -1, it means it’s empty. WeiDU can read signed values with e.g., READ_SSHORT. Signed values are ones for which a subset of values are interpreted as having a negative sign. In this example, if we were to read the value with READ_SHORT instead, all values would be interpreted as positive (so instead of -1, the value of "shield" would be 65535).

PATCH_IF (shield = "-1") BEGIN

Now, we have to update the shield slot to reflect that it’s the newest item out of all the items the creature has equipped. This is a bit misleading because in the slots part of the creature file, they count from 0. So, all we need to do is take the value of 0x2c0 (The number of items the creature has.) and use that as our value to write.

To do that, this is what we do:

WRITE_SHORT (itemslot + 0x04) numberofitems

Now we have to update the itemslot offset value to reflect the fact that we’re adding a new item to the creature. An item is *always* 0x14 bytes. We already know the offset of the itemslot offset and we’ve already read it’s value, so all we need to do is add 0x14 to it

WRITE_LONG 0x2b8 (itemslot + 0x14)

The last step before inserting our bytes is to increase the numberofitems by 1 to reflect the fact that we’ve added an item to the creature. We’ve already read in the number of items into "numberofitems" so this is dead easy:

WRITE_LONG 0x2c0 (numberofitems + 1)

Now we can actually insert out bytes. To do this we have to take the number of items that the creature has multiplied by 0x14 and add that to the itemsoffset. (The reason we can’t just insert it right at "itemsoffset" is because it would mess up the order of the items in game. If we inserted the shield at the beginning, then the creature would more than likely have some items equipped in some weird places in the game.)

This is done like so:

INSERT_BYTES (itemsoffset + numberofitems * 0x14) 0x14

Now we can actually write our information for our item. You don’t need the .itm extension at all, just everything before the .itm. And again, since the item entry is always the first entry in an item field on a creature file, we just need to use the same formula as above because we’ll be writing at the same offset that we inserted our bytes at:

WRITE_ASCII (itemsoffset + numberofitems * 0x14) ~shld01~

If you wanted to add a magical shield to the creature file and wanted it to be already identified in the slot, then you would simply have to add 0x10 bytes to the previous expression and WRITE_LONG the value of 1. Like this:

WRITE_LONG (itemsoffset + (numberofitems * 0x14) + 0x10) 1

Finally, we close the PATCH_IF statements and add BUT_ONLY_IF_CHANGES.

    END
  END
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

Here’s the full code:

COPY_EXISTING ~acolyte1.cre~ ~override~
  PATCH_IF (SOURCE_SIZE > 0x2d3) BEGIN
    READ_LONG 0x2bc itemsoffset
    READ_LONG 0x2b8 itemslot
    READ_LONG 0x2c0 numberofitems
    READ_SSHORT (itemslot + 0x04) shield

    PATCH_IF (shield = "-1") BEGIN

      WRITE_SHORT (itemslot + 0x04) numberofitems
      WRITE_LONG 0x2b8 (itemslot + 0x14)
      WRITE_LONG 0x2c0 (numberofitems + 1)

      INSERT_BYTES (itemsoffset + numberofitems * 0x14) 0x14

      WRITE_ASCII (itemsoffset + numberofitems * 0x14) ~shld01~
    END
  END
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

Note that you can use the PRINT action in a tp2 to debug your code as well. Like this:

COPY_EXISTING ~acolyte1.cre~ ~override~
  PATCH_IF (SOURCE_SIZE > 0x2d3) BEGIN
    READ_LONG 0x2bc itemsoffset
    READ_LONG 0x2b8 itemslot
    READ_LONG 0x2c0 numberofitems
    READ_SSHORT (itemslot + 0x04) shield

    PATCH_IF (shield = "-1") BEGIN

      WRITE_SHORT (itemslot + 0x04) numberofitems
      WRITE_LONG 0x2b8 (itemslot + 0x14)
      WRITE_LONG 0x2c0 (numberofitems + 1)

      INSERT_BYTES (itemsoffset + numberofitems * 0x14) 0x14

      WRITE_ASCII (itemsoffset + numberofitems * 0x14) ~shld01~
    END
  END
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

PRINT ~The value of the items offset is %itemsoffset%~

I should also mention that the above code for adding an item to a creature file is "portable" in a sense. You would only have to change a couple things. The changes that would have to be made are as follows:

  1. Change acolyte1.cre to the actual creature that you want to modify
  2. You’ll have to change ("itemslot" + 0x04) to something else if you are adding anything else but a shield. You can figure this out by subtracting the slot offset of the slot you want to modify from the item slots offset.
  3. You would need to change  shld01  to the item you are going to add.
  4. You’d have to add your own flags if they need adding (i.e. Identified, Not Stealable, etc.).

And that’s the end of it. All this can be a bit tricky, but as I mentioned above, it can be quite powerful as well.

10.5  ADD_STORE_ITEM (Last Update: v211)

This tutorial and this feature were thoughtfully provided by Japheth.

Using ADD_STORE_ITEM is a relatively painless procedure. Consider this example: I want to add a new item to ribald.sto in BGII. There were two ways of doing this before.

  1. I could add the item to the store beforehand and then simply copy over the new store file upon installing my mod.
  2. I could use WeiDU’s READ_BYTE and WRITE_BYTE patch expressions to patch the item into the store while installing.

Now we can do #2 rather easily thanks to ADD_STORE_ITEM.

First off copy over the store file to set it up for patching as you normally would.

COPY_EXISTING ~ribald.sto~ ~override~

Next we issue the ADD_STORE_ITEM patch expression with the following arguments:

ADD_STORE_ITEM "myitem" #10 #0 #0 ~IDENTIFIED~ #5

"myitem" is the name of the item file that we will want to appear in the store without it’s .itm extension. #10 is the first extension headers number of charges The two #0s that follow are the second and third extension headers number of charges.  IDENTIFED  is the flag that we want on the item.

#5 is the number of items that will be in stock.

Pretty easy stuff right?

You can also add an optional + after ADD_STORE_ITEM if you want to overwrite an item that already exists in the store.

So, if we wanted to replace HAMM05.ITM in ribald.sto this is what we’d do:

ADD_STORE_ITEM + ~hamm05~ #10 #0 #0 ~IDENTIFIED~ #5

One final note: remember to copy over your new item because ADD_STORE_ITEM doesn’t do that part for you.

So, a complete set of actions that would patch a store file and copy over the new item would look like this:

COPY_EXISTING ~ribald.sto~ ~override~
ADD_STORE_ITEM ~myitem~ #10 #0 #0 ~IDENTIFIED~ #5

COPY ~mymod/myitem.itm~ ~override~

Note that you can also add a final optional string argument if you want the store to have unlimited copies of that item:

ADD_STORE_ITEM ~myitem~ #10 #0 #0 ~IDENTIFIED~ #1 ~UNLIMITED~

Note that as of v188 you can specify the position of the item being added:

COPY_EXISTING ~ribald.sto~ ~override~
  ADD_STORE_ITEM ~myitem~   AFTER  ~olditem~ #10 #0 #0 ~IDENTIFIED~ #5
  ADD_STORE_ITEM ~otheritm~ BEFORE ~olditem~ #10 #0 #0 ~IDENTIFIED~ #5

Valid options for position are:

FIRST will add the item at the top of the stack. This is the default, equivalent to putting nothing there.

LAST will add the item to the bottom of the stack.

BEFORE  olditem  will add the item exactly before olditem, or to the top of the stack if olditem is missing.

AFTER  olditem  will add the item exactly after olditem, or to the bottom of the stack if olditem is missing.

As of 192, if there’s a list of items in BEFORE|AFTER olditem (IE ~item1 item2 item3~), we add the new item BEFORE or AFTER the first item that is present in the list.

As of 211, you can specify a (zero-based) hardcoded position via AT position.

10.6  ADD_GAM_NPC

This tutorial and this feature were thoughtfully provided by Japheth.

In BGII, the game engine was refined so that when any NPC joined your party they would be added to the baldur.gam file, regardless of the fact if they were in there already or not.

Sadly, in BG1 this is not the case. If you were to simply CreateCreature any old NPC and add them to your party, as soon as you moved to another area the game would crash and die.

This is where ADD_GAM_NPC comes in handy for all you BG1 modders out there.

By using ADD_GAM_NPC you can patch your NPC into all the baldur.gam files on an end users install. This includes the default GAM file that’s loaded up when you start a new game as well as all the GAM files in the save and mpsave directories.

Note: However, there really is no foolproof way to back up all the save games, so you may want to warn the end user in a readme to manually back them up themselves beforehand.

Anyways, I digress.

To use ADD_GAM_NPC you have to first copy over the CRE file that you will want to appear in the GAM file. I’m pretty sure we all know how to do this, but for completeness, here it is:

COPY ~mymod/mynpc.cre~ ~override~

After the COPY statement, make sure you do all your SAYs and any other type of patching that you’ll want to do for your .cre file. You will always want to use ADD_GAM_NPC last since you want the updates to your cre file to be reflected in the GAM file as well.

Here’s a typical patch statement for most NPC mods:

COPY ~mymod/mynpc.cre~ ~override~
  SAY NAME1 ~Japh~
  SAY NAME2 ~Japh~

So, after doing all that, we would issue ADD_GAM_NPC with the following arguments:

ADD_GAM_NPC "mynpc" "ar2600" #123 #456

"mynpc" is the name of your NPCs cre file that you’re copying over without the .cre extension.

"ar2600" is the area that you want him/her placed in. In this case we’re placing the NPC in Candlekeep.

#123 is the x co-ordinate on the map.

#456 is the y co-ordinate on the map.

That’s all there is to it. Just to recap, here’s the full set of expressions we would use:

COPY ~mymod/mynpc.cre~ ~override~
  SAY NAME1 ~Japh~
  SAY NAME2 ~Japh~
  // Do any other patching stuff here

ADD_GAM_NPC ~mynpc~ ~ar2600~ #123 #456

Note: Again, I have to stress the importance of warning the end users to backup their save and mpsave directories beforehand. There really is no elegant way to do this via WeiDU (well, maybe there is, but I can’t think of a way) so I’d just warn them.

10.7  SET_2DA_ENTRY

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Idobek.

There have been some queries about SET_2DA_ENTRY in the WeiDU forum recently. This is a consolidation of my posts on the subject. The command takes this form:

SET_2DA_ENTRY value value value newEntry

The first value is the row, the second is the column and the third is the required column count. The entry on the given column of the given row is set to newEntry, but only rows with at least as many columns as the required column count are considered. The upper-left entry is 0,0. For example, given the following 2DA file:

2DA V1.0
*
     ROWNAME        LOWER MIXED HELP
0    RESERVE        *     *     *
1    BERSERKER      25179 25151 25201
2    WIZARD_SLAYER  25180 25152 25203
3    KENSAI         25181 25153 25204
4    CAVALIER       25182 25154 25206

Then the patch:

SET_2DA_ENTRY 3 1 5 ~SAMURAI~

would result in:

2DA V1.0
*
     ROWNAME        LOWER MIXED HELP
0    RESERVE        *     *     *
1    BERSERKER      25179 25151 25201
2    WIZARD_SLAYER  25180 25152 25203
3    SAMURAI        25181 25153 25204
4    CAVALIER       25182 25154 25206

So the columns and rows you want WeiDU to consider are:

      Column0 Column1       Column2 Column3 Column4

              ROWNAME       LOWER   MIXED   HELP
Row0: 0       RESERVE       *       *       *
Row1: 1       BERSERKER     25179   25151   25201
Row2: 2       WIZARD_SLAYER 25180   25152   25203
Row3: 3       KENSAI        25181   25153   25204
Row4: 4       CAVALIER      25182   25154   25206

The total number of columns is five. If, however, you put 1 as your required column count then you tell WeiDU you want to consider all rows with at least 1 column. So your row numbers change:

Row0: 2DA V1.0
Row1: *
Row2:      ROWNAME        LOWER MIXED HELP
Row3: 0    RESERVE        *     *     *
Row4: 1    BERSERKER      25179 25151 25201
Row5: 2    WIZARD_SLAYER  25180 25152 25203
Row6: 3    KENSAI         25181 25153 25204
Row7: 4    CAVALIER       25182 25154 25206

So the required column count is what you use to tell WeiDU which row you want to use as row0. So using the code

SET_2DA_ENTRY 3 1 1 ~SAMURAI~

would result in:

2DA V1.0
*
     ROWNAME        LOWER MIXED HELP
0    SAMURAI        *     *     *
1    BERSERKER      25179 25151 25201
2    WIZARD_SLAYER  25180 25152 25203
3    KENSAI         25181 25153 25204
4    CAVALIER       25182 25154 25206

Hopefully, that explains the required column count a little better.

Finally, if newEntry is a string that contains any %WeiDU_Variables% they are replaced by their values. That’s the end of this tutorial.

10.8  WHILE Loops (Last update: v232)

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Idobek, and shamelessly edited by Bigg to use PATCH_IF rather than IF_EVAL, and PATCH_IF rather than WHILE. It was then further edited by Wisp to make it look slightly more contemporary.

Note: In almost all circumstances, it is preferable to use FOR instead.

So what is a WHILE loop? Well, very simply put it is a way of applying the same patch to a file multiple times under a different condition each time. Or it is a way of applying different patches depending upon the conditions. This example will show both of these methods. Keeping in theme we are going to modify the damage done by axes. Now, some axes have both a melee and a ranged ability. We are going to want to change both of these abilities but give different damage to ranged and melee.

First, as always, we need to copy the files ready for patching, and throw in the usual sanity check:

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP ~.*\.itm~ ~override~
  PATCH_IF (SOURCE_SIZE > 0x71) BEGIN

We only want to modify axes so let’s find out what the item is:

READ_BYTE 0x1c category

Once we are done with our patching we will use PATCH_IF to tell WeiDU to only patch axes:

PATCH_IF (category = 25) BEGIN

Now, we need to find out how many abilities there are and where they are located:

READ_LONG 0x64 abilitiesoffset
READ_SHORT 0x68 numberofabilities

So far, so good. Here’s where the fun begins. We want to patch examine every ability in the item. We use a WHILE loop to patch the abilities one by one. We open the loop like so:

WHILE (numberofabilities > 0) BEGIN

For the WHILE loop to progress and close we need to modify the "numberofabilities" variable. We use the SET command to do this:

SET numberofabilities = (numberofabilities - 1)
END

These lines are placed at the end of the WHILE loop. WeiDU will process the abilities from last to first and reduce the "numberofabilities" variable by one each time. Once the "numberofabilities" variable hits zero the WHILE loop will stop.

OK, now we need to find out what type of ability we are looking at. Within an item an ability is 0x38 bytes, abilities also count from 0 within items so we must take this into account:

READ_BYTE (abilitiesoffset + (numberofabilities - 1) * 0x38) abilitytype

Now we get to the meat of the patch. This patch is conditional on the ability type we have just read. First we will deal with the melee damage patch. We are going to be using a PATCH_IF command to do this

PATCHING (abilitytype = 1) BEGIN

So we are patching when the ability type is 1 (melee). Time for the actual patch:

WRITE_SHORT (abilitiesoffset + (numberofabilities - 1) * 0x38 + 0x16) 6
WRITE_SHORT (abilitiesoffset + (numberofabilities - 1) * 0x38 + 0x18) 2

Time to close the PATCH_IF statement.

END

We use exactly the same method for ranged abilities:

PATCH_IF (abilitytype = 2) BEGIN
   WRITE_SHORT (abilitiesoffset + (numberofabilities - 1) * 0x38 + 0x16) 12
   WRITE_SHORT (abilitiesoffset + (numberofabilities - 1) * 0x38 + 0x18) 1
END

We can now close the main loop (using the aforementioned method):

SET numberofabilities = (numberofabilities - 1)
END

We are done with our patches so we can add our usual END and BUT_ONLY.

END
END
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

The full code is:

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP ~.*\.itm~ ~override~
  PATCH_IF (SOURCE_SIZE > 0x71) BEGIN
    READ_BYTE 0x1c category
    PATCH_IF (category = 25) BEGIN
      READ_LONG 0x64 abilitiesoffset
      READ_SHORT 0x68 numberofabilities
      WHILE (numberofabilities > 0) BEGIN
        READ_BYTE (abilitiesoffset + (numberofabilities - 1) * 0x38) abilitytype
        PATCH_IF (abilitytype = 1) BEGIN
          WRITE_SHORT (abilitiesoffset + (numberofabilities - 1) * 0x38 + 0x16) 6
          WRITE_SHORT (abilitiesoffset + (numberofabilities - 1) * 0x38 + 0x18) 2
        END
        PATCH_IF (abilitytype = 2) BEGIN
          WRITE_SHORT (abilitiesoffset + (numberofabilities - 1) * 0x38 + 0x16) 12
          WRITE_SHORT (abilitiesoffset + (numberofabilities - 1) * 0x38 + 0x18) 1
        END
        SET numberofabilities = (numberofabilities - 1)
      END
    END
  END
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

So what have we done? Let’s list the steps involved:

  1. First off we copied all the item files ready for patching.
  2. Then we the read in the item category.
  3. We also read in the number of abilities and the file location of those abilities.
  4. We open a WHILE loop based upon the number of abilities.
  5. Within the WHILE loop, we read in the ability type.
  6. Next we defined a new variable to indicate that we had not yet patched any melee type abilities.
  7. We opened a PATCH_IF statement.
  8. We patched melee abilities to do 2D6 damage.
  9. We closed this PATCH_IF loop.
  10. We repeated steps 6-9 to give the ranged abilities 1D12 damage.
  11. We closed our main WHILE loop by reducing the number of abilities by 1 and indicating that it should stop if the number of abilities reached 0.
  12. We used a PATCH_IF statement to ensure the patch is only applied to axes.

That’s the end of this tutorial.

10.9  Bitwise Operators (Last update: v232)

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by CamDawg, and shamelessly edited by Bigg to use PATCH_IF rather than IF_EVAL. It was then further edited by Wisp to make it look slightly more contemporary.

This was a topic that I struggled with while trying to convert some kits with unusual item restrictions. Thanks to WeiDU’s new bitwise operators, this is a process that can done dynamically and non-destructively and affect all items of a particular type, even if added or altered by another mod (assuming yours is installed after others of course ). The basic idea is to construct a function in WeiDU that:

  1. Searches through all item files in the game
  2. Reads selected data from an item (type, usability, etc)
  3. Alters specific data on an item without changing anything else

This tutorial is basically an expansion on Japheth’s excellent READ/BYTE/LONG/SHORT tutorial and I suggest you take a look at that before going further.

My initial problem came about when trying to make specific items usable or unusable by a particular class/race/kit. If you look at the item file structure at IESDP, you see that all of the unusability flags of an item are controlled by the individual bits of bytes 0x1E, 0x1F, 0x20 and 0x21 for class/race alignment restrictions and 0x29, 0x2B, 0x2D and 0x2F for the individual kit restrictions. (Near Infinity combines and displays the four bytes of class/race restrictions as a single chunk of data.)

A quick aside about notation before I proceed. Numbers in binary (the strings of bits) are preceded with 0b and hexadecimal numbers (typically the bytes) are preceded with 0x. Eight bits make a byte and bits are read right-to-left. So if the second bit is 1 and the rest 0, then the bit would be written as 0b00000010.

If you were trying to alter the usability of a specific class or race, simply using a WRITE_BYTE command on any of these particular bytes would result in changing the usability of an item by all the classes in the particular byte. The new bitwise operators provide an easier solution.

First we need to look at what the new operators BAND and BOR do with bits. They are both ways of combining two bytes, based on different rules. Both BAND and BOR compare the individual bits (bit 0 vs bit 0, bit 1 vs bit 1, etc. all the way through bit 7 vs bit 7) of two bytes. For each individual bit, the following tables are used to determine the value:

0 BAND 0 = 0
0 BAND 1 = 0
1 BAND 0 = 0
1 BAND 1 = 1

0 BOR 0 = 0
0 BOR 1 = 1
1 BOR 0 = 1
1 BOR 1 = 1

So if byte 0x23 is 0b00110101 and byte 0x24 is 0b10010001, then 0x23 BAND 0x24 is 0b00010001 whereas 0x23 BOR 0x24 is 0b10110101.

Back to relating this to unusability in items. For an item to be flagged as unusable, the corresponding bit must be set to 1. A 0 means a particular item is usable by the class/race. Let’s look at the example of changing mage robes usable by bards. This would go into your TP2 file.

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP GLOB ~.*\.itm~ ~override~ //copies all item files
  PATCH_IF (SOURCE_SIZE > 0x71) BEGIN // avoid crashing on empty items
    READ_BYTE    0x20 mage //reads the byte containing the mage usability flag
    PATCH_IF ((mage BAND 0b00000100) = 0b00000000) BEGIN // if it is usable by mages
      READ_BYTE    0x1E bard //reads the byte containing bard usability flag
      READ_SHORT    0x1C type //reads the byte containing item type
      PATCH_IF (type = 67) OR (type = 2) BEGIN // if it is a robe or armor
        WRITE_BYTE    0x1E (bard BAND 0b10111111)  // makes usable by bards
      END
    END
  END
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

This is the same basic idea in Japheth’s BYTE tutorial , except now we’re utilizing the bitwise operators in the writing and evaluation commands. The mage usability flag is the bit 2 in byte 0x20 (IESDP). By checking "mage" BAND 0b00000100, the values of any of the 7 other bits (0-1,3-7) are set to 0, whereas bit 2 is equal to 0 if and only if it is 0 to begin with. Therefore the statement will only be true if the item is usable by mages (bit 2 = 0). If that is true and the item is a robe or armor, then we write ("bard" BAND 0b10111111) into the bard usability byte, 0x1E. By using 1 in bits 0-5 and 7, this ensures that the original value of the flag is preserved, and using 0 in bit 6 ensures that bit 6 is set to 0 regardless of its previous value--making it usable by bards whether it was before or not.

Just as an aside, you could read the entire usability block with a READ_LONG at 0x1E. However, it becomes a pain because then you need to start writing out all 32 bits when doing the bitwise operations.

Let’s try another example. Let’s try making large weapons such as two-handed swords and halberds unusable by short folks--gnomes, halflings, and dwarves.

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP GLOB ~.*\.itm~ ~override~ //copies all item files
  PATCH_IF (SOURCE_SIZE > 0x71) BEGIN // avoid crashing on empty items
    READ_BYTE    0x21 race //reads the byte containing race usability flags we're interested in
    READ_BYTE    0x31 prof //reads the byte containing item type
    PATCH_IF (prof = 93) OR    // two-handed sword
             (prof = 99) BEGIN // or halberd
      WRITE_BYTE    0x21 (race BOR 0b00010101)  // makes unusable by dwarves, halflings, and gnomes
    END
  END
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

In this case, rather than reading the ’type’ byte of the item, I’ve opted for the ’proficiency’ byte. Many two-handed swords in BG2 are classed as long swords for some reason so in this case proficiency is a better indicator if it is a two-handed sword IMHO.

The unusability flags for dwarves, halflings and gnomes are all in byte 0x2F at bits 0, 2, and 4 respectively (thanks again IESDP). By writing "race" BOR 0b00010101 to byte 0x2F we’re preserving the values of bits 1,3, and 5-7 while setting the 0, 2, and 4 bits to 1 (unusable) regardless of their previous values.

Thanks especially to Smoketest for helping me with this, Japheth for the tutorial that inspired this and the help given, and the IESDP team.

10.10  Scripting Styles (Last Update: v232)

While the BCS and BAF script formats are common to all Infinity Engine games, there are three main variants. The variations deal largely with how “object parameters” are expressed. The style used by Baldur’s Gate, Baldur’s Gate 2, and Icewind Dale is considered to be the default. This document will not explain Infinity Engine scripting -- look for a tutorial elsewhere.

BG BAF ObjectEA.GENERAL.RACE.CLASS.SPECIFIC.GENDER.ALIGN
PST BAF ObjectEA.FACTION.TEAM.GENERAL.RACE.CLASS.SPECIFIC.GENDER.ALIGN
IWD2 BAF ObjectEA.GENERAL.RACE.SUBRACE.CLASS.SPECIFIC.GENDER.ALIGNMNT

If SUBRACE.IDS is present in CHITIN.KEY, the scripting style is autodetected as IWD2. Otherwise, if BONES.IDS is present, the scripting style is autodetected as PST. Otherwise, if CLOWNRAN.IDS is present, the scripting syle is autodetected as IWD1. Otherwise, if FLYTHR01.MVE is present, the scripting style is autodetected as BG2. Otherwise, if OH1000.ARE or OH6000.ARE are present, the scripting style is autodetected as BGEE/BG2. Otherwise the scripting style is set to BG1. The --script-style command-line argument and the SCRIPT_STYLE TP2 flag both override this default. You should not need to use --script-style explicitly if the --game is set correctly.

Furthermore, the scripting style is coupled with the format used for TLK strings. If the scripting style is BG2, strings are stored in the BG2 format.

Also, IWD1 and IWD2 have different rules for parsing certain IDS files, which contain spaces and/or commas in the tokens.

10.11  TP2 SUBCOMPONENT Groups (Last Update: v192)

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by CamDawg, and edited by the Bigg to account for FORCED_SUBCOMPONENT.

SUBCOMPONENTs allow to group together a set of mutually exclusive mod components into a single menu-style selection. The primary purpose of SUBCOMPONENTs is to streamline mod installation and to make life easier for end users. For example, SUBCOMPONENTs are ideal if you wish to provide multiple portrait selections for an NPC mod, have several kits available to one NPC, or for changes that conflict with one another (i.e. raising an XP cap to 10 million or raising it to 20 million). We’ll use the first one (multiple portrait options) as an example.

Without SUBCOMPONENTs, the install dialogue would look something like this:

Install Component [Delainy Portrait 1 by Bob]?
[I]nstall, [N]ot Install, or [Q]uit

Install Component [Delainy Portrait 2 by Fred]?
[I]nstall, [N]ot Install, or [Q]uit

Install Component [Delainy Portrait 3 by Wilhelmus]?
[I]nstall, [N]ot Install, or [Q]uit

The end user would need to click through the options each time. Worse, conflicting components could be installed. These problems can be limited somewhat by judicious use of predicates, but taking advantage of the SUBCOMPONENT feature yields far superior results:

Install Component [Delainy Portrait]?
[N]o, [Q]uit, or choose one:
 1] Portrait 1 by Bob
 2] Portrait 2 by Fred
 3] Portrait 3 by Wilhelmus

Only one of these options can be installed at any time; re-installing and selecting a different SUBCOMPONENT will automatically uninstall the previously installed one. Setting this up is dead simple:

BEGIN ~Portrait 1 by Bob~
/* The string above is displayed in the subcomponent listing, i.e. the list
with 1] 2] 3] etc. You can, of course, use TRA references instead for this
and the SUBCOMPONENT string below. */
SUBCOMPONENT ~ Delainy Portrait~
/* The string above is displayed as the component listing and must be the
same for each SUBCOMPONENT. The tp2 code that follows is only executed if
this SUBCOMPONENT is selected. */
COPY ~Delainy/portraits/opt1G.bmp~ ~override/CDDELAIG.bmp~
COPY ~Delainy/portraits/opt1M.bmp~ ~override/CDDELAIM.bmp~
COPY ~Delainy/portraits/opt1S.bmp~ ~override/CDDELAIS.bmp~

BEGIN ~Portrait 2 by Fred~
SUBCOMPONENT ~ Delainy Portrait~
COPY ~Delainy/portraits/opt2G.bmp~ ~override/CDDELAIG.bmp~
COPY ~Delainy/portraits/opt2M.bmp~ ~override/CDDELAIM.bmp~
COPY ~Delainy/portraits/opt2S.bmp~ ~override/CDDELAIS.bmp~

BEGIN ~Portrait 3 by Wilhelmus~
SUBCOMPONENT ~ Delainy Portrait~
COPY ~Delainy/portraits/opt3G.bmp~ ~override/CDDELAIG.bmp~
COPY ~Delainy/portraits/opt3M.bmp~ ~override/CDDELAIM.bmp~
COPY ~Delainy/portraits/opt3S.bmp~ ~override/CDDELAIS.bmp~

Any REQUIRE_FILEs or other module requirements for the whole group should be put with the first subcomponent. If such a requirement fails, none of the subcomponents can be installed. In addition, each individual subcomponent can be guarded by its own predicate. If that predicate fails, that particular subcomponent cannot be installed. Example:

BEGIN ~Imoen: Turnip-Mage~
SUBCOMPONENT ~Imoen Mage Kit~ (FILE_EXISTS_IN_GAME ~turnip.spl~)
  // This particular subcomponent will only be displayed if TURNIP.SPL
  // exists. If it does not, you can still install other subcomponents.

One note about SUBCOMPONENTs and mod ordering: WeiDU will display SUBCOMPONENTs in a single grouping no matter if they fall consecutively in the TP2. However, the component number (the one that gets placed in weidu.log and the one you check for in REQUIRE_COMPONENT et al.) is still based on their TP2 order.

As of v192, if all subcomponents fail their requirement, then we don’t ask about the specific group; moreover, if at least one of the subcomponents is defined with FORCED_SUBCOMPONENT rather than SUBCOMPONENT, then the user is forced to install one of them. This could be useful if you want to ask the user if he wants biffing of wav files or not (as you need different actions for either choice).

10.12  ADD_CRE_ITEM (Last Update: v240)

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Japheth.

This command is a little bit more complex.

Here is the syntax:

COPY_EXISTING ~alynar.cre~ ~override~
  ADD_CRE_ITEM ~itemname~ #charge1 #charge2 #charge3 ~Flags~ ~Inventory Slots~ [EQUIP] [TWOHANDED] [NOMOVE]

EQUIP and TWOHANDED are optional and are only needed when dealing with weapons. NOMOVE is likewise optional and controls whether ADD_CRE_ITEM should move items to make room for the new item. If no items are moved and there are no empty slots, the new item will not be added. Conversely, if an item is moved and there is no empty slot into which to move it, the moved item is lost.

I’ll give some examples now.

Example #1:

If I want to add a Ring of Protection to Sir Alynar, here’s what I’d do:

COPY_EXISTING ~alynar.cre~ ~override~
  ADD_CRE_ITEM ~ring06~ #0 #0 #0 ~IDENTIFIED~ ~RRING LRING~

This will add the item to his right ring slot. If that slot is full, it will be added to the left ring slot. If both are full, we move the current right ring (the first slot in the list) to an an empty inventory slot so that the Ring of Protection is still put in it’s appropriate slot.

Example #2:

If I want to add a +2 Longsword to his second weapon slot, but don’t want to equip it, here’s what I’d do:

COPY_EXISTING ~alynar.cre~ ~override~
  ADD_CRE_ITEM ~sw1h06~ #0 #0 #0 ~IDENTIFIED~ ~WEAPON2~

Again, if there happens to be a weapon in his second weapon slot already, then we simply move that weapon to an empty inventory slot.

Example #3:

Same deal as example #2 except now I want to equip the sword.

COPY_EXISTING ~alynar.cre~ ~override~
  ADD_CRE_ITEM ~sw1h06~ #0 #0 #0 ~IDENTIFIED~ ~WEAPON2~ EQUIP

This will put the sword in his second weapon slot and equip it. And again, if there’s already a weapon in that slot, it will be moved to an empty inventory slot.

Example #4:

If you want to add a two-handed weapon and equip it, here’s what you do:

COPY_EXISTING ~alynar.cre~ ~override~
  ADD_CRE_ITEM ~sw2h01~ #0 #0 #0 ~NONE~ ~WEAPON2~ EQUIP TWOHANDED

This will place the item in the second weapon slot (and again, if there’s already a weapon there it’s moved to inventory), remove anything that’s in the shield slot and put it in an empty inventory slot and finally it will equip the weapon.

If you just want to add a two-handed weapon to a cre but don’t need it equipped, then you don’t have to worry about specifying EQUIP or TWOHANDED.

Finally, it is worth noting that any WeiDU variables inside %s in the itemname will be replaced by their values.

Phew, that’s it.

Note: starting from v189, you can use INV, QITEM, QUIVER, WEAPON and RING as shortcuts respectively to INV1 INV2 ... INV15 INV16, QITEM1 QITEM2 QITEM3, QUIVER1 QUIVER2 QUIVER3, WEAPON1...WEAPON4, RRING LRING.

In IWD2, INV unfolds to INV1..INV24, SHIELD to SHIELD1..4.

In PST, INV unfolds to INV1..20, TATTOO to TATTOO1..3, EARRING to EARING1..2, QITEM to QITEM1..5, QUIVER1..5. PST also supports HAND, but loses SHIELD and HELMET.

10.13  Prompt Customization

This tutorial was thoughtfully provided by Rastor, and edited by Wisp to clarify the role of prompts.tra.

A customized installer can make your mod look more unique to your end user, giving a feel that “This isn’t your basic, cookie-cutter mod.” WeiDU actually allows for a great deal of customization of the mod installer program (ie. the setup-mymod.exe file). For the most part, just about every line of text can be changed to suit your needs. This tutorial will show you how.

Understanding the Installer. WeiDU, like most computer programs, draws every line of text that it displays from a series of strings. In a default installer (simply a renamed weidu.exe and the appropriate .tp2), all of the strings that WeiDU displays are programmed into WeiDU’s source code. Fortunately, weidu allows you to overwrite these strings with ones of your own choosing.

prompts.tra. In the WeiDU download package (from http://www.weidu.org), you will find a file in the examples folder called prompts.tra. This is the file that you modify to customize your installer. Go look at it now.

WeiDU defines a number of default tra references, which are displayed at different points during the installation. The tra-reference numbers and default text are reproduced in the prompts.tra file. By editing or translating this text, and loading the resulting tra strings as any other, the text displayed by WeiDU can be changed.

An Example. Let us assume for a minute that you want the question asking if users want to install to read:

You are a big stupid moron if you do not install the [Component Name].
Install?
[Y]es you idiot or [N]o, bonehead or [Q]uit

For obvious reasons, you would never want your mod’s installer to actually say that but it will serve as a good working example.

To change the install component text, find the section of prompts.tra that corresponds with the text that you wish to change. In this case, we want to change @-1006 and @-1008. If you look at these lines, you will see a strange
n that does not actually appear when the installer is running. This is a line feed (or “new line”) character. It simply indicates that you want any text following it to be inserted below the text that precedes the line feed.

The name of the component in your mod is always inserted immediately following @-1006 without any spaces. This means that you are going to want to include a space or a bracket or some other distinguishing character at the end of your new text, otherwise the installer’s text will look quite strange. The name of the component also is always followed (with no spaces) by either line @-1007 or @-1008 depending on whether the component is already installed or not.

If you want to include more text in your custom line before the [I]nstall or [N]ot Install stuff, then simply place it before the
n character.

To generate the custom text that I presented above, change the lines in your prompts.tra file to read:

@-1006= "You are a big stupid moron if you do not install the ["
@-1008= "].  Install?\n[Y]es you idiot or [N]o, bonehead or [Q]uit"

After making these changes, place prompts.tra into the TRA folder.

If you are familiar with the default text in the installer, then you will recognize the all of the lines that are listed in prompts.tra. You may change any of the text, but simply remember the meaning of the line feed. The WeiDU installer will not word wrap, meaning that if you insert a very large line that is not broken up by
n, the user will not be able to see all of it. You should do some experimentation to determine the optimal length for each line (it’s roughly 72 characters).

What you cannot change. Although WeiDU does allow for a large degree of customization, there are a few things that you cannot change. You cannot change the input keys used to collect the player’s response. You cannot change the Copying one file and Compiling dialogues (and the similar) text.

10.14  INNER_ACTION

Normally I would start off with do not use this feature, but since this patch can basically only be used to do really obscure things, you’re probably already a master if you’re considering it.

We’ll use INNER_ACTION in the context of a hypothetical mod that causes all monsters to drop special “skins” that can be worn by the PCs, granting the PCs all of the “natural talents” (e.g., fire resistance, seeing through invisibility, animation avatar) of that monster.

First, we will specially prepare a “template” object -- a special blank “skin” item that has slots equipped effects like “fire resistance bonus +0” and “natural armor class 10” and “change creature animation”. Each creature “skin” will be a specialized copy of this template.

Then we’ll consider each monster in turn. We’ll read the fire resistance value from the monster and write that value into a copy of the “skin” item. Then we’ll repeat the process for “armor class”, “cold resistance”, etc. We’ll also copy over any “CRE effects” the creature might have (e.g., “can see invisible”) and make them additional equipped effects of the “skin” item. Finally we’ll add that personalized “skin” item to the monster’s inventory. If the monster is C6BODHI.CRE, we’ll call the skin C6BODHI.ITM.

Note that you would normally always use a modder prefix for your new items and other files.

We’ll give the code in pieces. First, we want to go over every existing creature and make sure that CREATURE.ITM doesn’t already exist in the game. If it does we won’t make a “skin” for that monster. We’ll also include a little size sanity check to make sure that we’re not ready any degenerate 0-byte files.

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP GLOB ~.*\.cre~ ~override~
  PATCH_IF
    (SOURCE_SIZE > 0x2c8) AND
    (NOT FILE_CONTAINS_EVALUATED("%SOURCE_RES%.ITM" "ITM"))
  THEN BEGIN // %SOURCE_RES%.ITM does not exist.

See SOURCE_RES. Using "ITM" as the second argument makes FILE_CONTAINS_EVALUATED behave like FILE_EXISTS_EVALUATED, since any real item contains ITM as part of its header.

Now we’re going to read the animation, armor class, resistances, and creature effects. We’ll also equip this creature with its special skin, even through we haven’t made that skin yet.

    READ_SHORT 0x28    anim_id
    READ_SHORT 0x46    natural_ac
    READ_ASCII 0x59    resists (11) // read 11 bytes (even 0's)
    READ_LONG  0x2c4   eff_off
    READ_LONG  0x2c8   num_eff
    READ_ASCII eff_off effects (num_eff * 264)
    ADD_CRE_ITEM ~%SOURCE_RES%~ #0 #0 #0 ~IDENTIFIED~ ~INV10~

Since there are 11 resistances (e.g., fire, cold, magic fire, ...) we are just leaving them in a string as an array of bytes rather than making up individual variables for each one. Now we want to go about creating our special skin item. We’ll use the mysterious INNER_ACTION to do so.

    INNER_ACTION BEGIN
      COPY ~foo/footemp.itm~ ~override/%SOURCE_RES%.ITM~
        WRITE_SHORT 0x76 anim_id
        WRITE_SHORT 0xa6 natural_ac

Using SOURCE_RES as part of a computed COPY destination is normally somewhat dangerous because it is reset every time you enter a COPY -- but we’re OK here.

Our template footemp.itm item has a number of pre-made equipped abilities (e.g., no dispel, bypass resistance, apply 100 % of the time to the wearer, last while equipped) that are just lacking concrete values. Here we fill in the animation and armor class. Next we’ll do the resistances:

        // copy over all resistances
        FOR (i=0; i<11 ; i=i+1) BEGIN
          INNER_PATCH "%resists%" BEGIN
            READ_BYTE i resist_i
          END
          foo_resist_off = 0xd6 + (i * (0x102 - 0xd2))
          WRITE_LONG foo_resist_off resist_i
        END

For each of the 11 resistances we remember its value from the creature by using INNER_PATCH to get it out of our resists “array”. The resistance effects in footemp.itm are stored in the same order as the creature resistances are in a CRE file.

Having handled the standard resistances we now turn to creature effects. We don’t know in advance how many creature effects there will be, so for each one we will make a new effect structure and insert it into our skin item. We’ll get the new effect structure by copying one of the ones that was already there (called dummy_eff in the code below).

Unfortunately, creature effects are not stored in quite the same way as item effects, so we can’t copy them over directly. Instead, from each creature effect we’ll extract the opcode, value and resource fields. We end up with a three step process: (1) insert some bytes into the skin file to hold the new effect, (2) copy over the dummy_eff effect structure as a framework, and (3) fill in the appropriate values from the creature effect. Here it is:

        // copy all CRE effects
        PATCH_IF num_eff > 0 THEN BEGIN
          READ_ASCII 0x72 dummy_eff (0x30)
          FOR (i=0; i<num_eff; i=i+1) BEGIN
            INNER_PATCH "%effects%" BEGIN
              READ_ASCII ((i * 264) +  8) "cre_eff_opcode" (0x4)
              READ_ASCII ((i * 264) + 20) "cre_eff_value"  (0x8)
              READ_ASCII ((i * 264) + 40) "cre_eff_res"    (0x8)
            END
            INSERT_BYTES 0x72 0x30                        // step 1
            WRITE_EVALUATED_ASCII 0x72 "%dummy_eff%"      // step 2
            WRITE_EVALUATED_ASCII 0x72 "%cre_eff_opcode%" // step 3
            WRITE_EVALUATED_ASCII 0x76 "%cre_eff_value%"  // step 3
            WRITE_EVALUATED_ASCII 0x86 "%cre_eff_res%"    // step 3
          END
          READ_SHORT  0x70 num_global_itm_eff
          WRITE_SHORT 0x70 (num_global_itm_eff + num_eff)
        END
    END

Huzzah. Notice our use of variables to “pass information” between the main copying action and the INNER_ACTION. Yes, I hate WeiDU syntax as well. Why do you ask? Anyway, after that we update the item header to take into account the new global effects.

  END
  BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

Finally we close off our sanity-checks and throw in the ever-popular BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES. It would be “easy” (read: annoying and time-consuming but possible) to extend this hackery so that it also stole all of the effects from undroppable items held by creature (e.g., most “undead” immunities are actually stored in RING95.ITM and not as creature effects) by nesting yet-another INNER_ACTION. You could even be selective and avoid copying over effects like “minimum hit points”. Then you could perhaps create an on-the-fly description for the “skin” item using SAY_EVALUATED.

Bonus points if you actually understood this code. Additional bonus points if you find a real use for INNER_ACTION in your mod. As a closing warning, do not try to re-invent the WeiMorph wheel using a TP2 script -- email Japheth instead.

10.15  SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER and SET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW (Last Update: v241)

SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER and SET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW are extensions of the SET_2DA_ENTRY patch, so you should be familiar with SET_2DA_ENTRY before reading this tutorial. A tutorial for SET_2DA_ENTRY exists.

The main difference between the standard SET_2DA_ENTRY and these variants is that SET_2DA_ENTRY changes the file each instance, while SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER stores a list of changes in memory and relies on SET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW to flush the changes and update the file. This can result in better performance than SET_2DA_ENTRY. According to Weimer’s calculations, using the deferred approach gives an edge when 5 or more SET_2DA_ENTRY are to be applied to the same file.

To illustrate the differences, consider the following code, which allows for thieves, cleric/thieves and mage/thieves to put 3 proficiency points in Two-weapon fighting using SET_2DA_ENTRY:

COPY_EXISTING ~weapprof.2da~ ~override~
  SET_2DA_ENTRY 34 7  1 3
  SET_2DA_ENTRY 34 39 1 3
  SET_2DA_ENTRY 34 40 1 3

Compare this with the equivalent code using SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER and SET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW:

COPY_EXISTING ~weapprof.2da~ ~override~
  SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER ~_#_#_#weapprof~ 34 7  3
  SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER ~_#_#_#weapprof~ 34 39 3
  SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER ~_#_#_#weapprof~ 34 40 3
  SET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW ~_#_#_#weapprof~ 1

The first approach makes three self-contained changes to the 2DA table in weapprof.2da. Each SET_2DA_ENTRY loads the table, makes a change and saves the table.

The second approach stores three changes to the 2DA table in memory with SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER. Finally, SET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW loads the 2DA table, makes the stored changes and saves the table. The string ~_#_#_#weapprof~ is used for storing the changes and whatever form it takes, it should only be used for SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER and SET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW. Avoid using variables with names containing the same string in other contexts. It is safe to use the same string in consecutive uses of SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER, but not in parallel uses. SET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW finalizes a series and makes the string safe to re-use. You can use %variables% in the string. One suggestion is to use a prefix specific to SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER and onto that append the name of the file being edited, like ~_#_#_#weapprof~, where _#_#_# is the prefix and weapprof is the name of the file. It is specifically not safe to use the same string for READ_2DA_ENTRY_FORMER as you are using for SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER.

10.16  READ_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW and READ_2DA_ENTRY_FORMER (Last Update: v241)

READ_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW and READ_2DA_ENTRY_FORMER are extensions of READ_2DA_ENTRY. You are advised to be familiar with how READ_2DA_ENTRY works before reading this tutorial.

Much like how SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER and SET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW offer a performance improvement over SET_2DA_ENTRY for a sufficiently large number of writes, READ_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW and READ_2DA_ENTRY_FORMER offer a performance improvement over READ_2DA_ENTRY for a sufficiently large number of reads.

To illustrate the differences, consider the following code, which reads values from a 2DA file using READ_2DA_ENTRY:

COPY_EXISTING ~kitlist.2da~ ~override~
  READ_2DA_ENTRY 0 1 9 somevar // somevar will be "RESERVE"

Compare this with the equivalent code using READ_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW and READ_2DA_ENTRY_FORMER:

COPY_EXISTING ~kitlist.2da~ ~override~
  READ_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW ~_#_#_#read_kitlist~ 9
  READ_2DA_ENTRY_FORMER ~_#_#_#read_kitlist~ 0 1 somevar // somevar will be "RESERVE"

In the first approach, each 2DA entry is read in a self-contained manner. Each time, the 2DA table is loaded and the entry from the given row and column is extracted and stored in the variable.

The second approach loads the table once and stores it as an array of discrete values. Retrieving a value from the table is only a matter of getting the value of a variable. The names of the storage variables are derived from the string, ~_#_#_#read_kitlist~ in this case. Additionally, a variable %_#_#_#read_kitlist% is defined, with a value equalling the number of rows that have at least 9 columns. In other words, using READ_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW additionally gives you the equivalent of COUNT_2DA_ROWS. It is not necessarily safe to make use of the same string in consecutive uses of READ_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW. If you have used the same string when reading from another 2DA table and you attempt to retrieve a value from a column greater than the required column count, the result is undefined. It is specifically not safe to use the same string you use for READ_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW as you are using for SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER. In this example, the string follows the same structure as in the SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER and SET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW tutorial, but with the string read_ prepended to the file name, to make sure the two strings can never be identical.

10.17  DEFINE,LAUNCH,LOCAL and everything else about personal macros (Last Update: v188)

Macros were originally intended as a way to repeat a certain tp2 block with small or no changes without resorting to copy-and-paste.

Note well: In almost all circumstances it is preferable to use functions instead of macros.

First, disclaimers: it’s very easy to shoot yourself in the foot, since there aren’t any limits to the variable scoping of macros. Due to this reason, this tutorial will skip on most basic stuff - if you’re going to consider this, you should already be a master of patching.
Also, for brevity, I’ll give only examples involving tp2 actions. You can do everything you’re about to read here by substituting DEFINE_ACTION_MACRO and LAUNCH_ACTION_MACRO with DEFINE_PATCH_MACRO and LAUNCH_PATCH_MACRO. There is no change in the treatment of LOCAL_SPRINT/LOCAL_SET.

For starters, you might want to define a macro that prints "Hello World!" to the screen.

// at the tp2 flag level, IE after AUTHOR but before components.
DEFINE_ACTION_MACRO ~HW~ BEGIN
  PRINT ~Hello World!~
END

/* ... */

// a component
BEGIN ~Print Hello World and do nothing~
LAUNCH_ACTION_MACRO ~HW~

So, the syntax is quite simple:

DEFINE_ACTION_MACRO name-of-the-macro BEGIN
  local variables list
  action list
END

will bind the action listed here with name-of-the-macro. We’ll deal with local variables later. After that, LAUNCH_ACTION_MACRO name-of-the-macro will work like if you copy-pasted there the action list defined in DEFINE_ACTION_MACRO.

Well, suppose you wanted to say ’Hello Jon!’ or ’Hello Jack!’ or any other name, rather than only ’Hello World!’. Do you have to define a macro for each of these? Of course not, since all variables defined before the LAUNCH_ACTION_MACRO instruction is called are not cleared, and so can be read (or written) during execution of the macro.

// before calling, have the string ~HW_Name~ contain the name of the person
// to greet.
DEFINE_ACTION_MACRO ~HW~ BEGIN
  PRINT ~Hello %HW_Name%!~
END

/* ... */
OUTER_SPRINT ~HW_Name~ ~Jon~
LAUNCH_ACTION_MACRO ~HW~
OUTER_SPRINT ~HW_Name~ ~Jack~
LAUNCH_ACTION_MACRO ~HW~

Variables inside macros that are changed keep their new value once the macro has finished being computed. This is bad and good at the same time. For example, you might want to calculate a factorial:

// set ~factorial_index~ to the factorial you'd like to compute,
// ~factorial_result~ to 1,
// keep a backup copy of ~factorial_index~
// ~factorial_result~ will yield the resulting factorial.
DEFINE_ACTION_MACRO ~factorial~ BEGIN
  ACTION_IF factorial_index != 1 THEN
  BEGIN
    OUTER_SET factorial_result = factorial_result * factorial_index
    OUTER_SET factorial_index = factorial_index - 1
     LAUNCH_ACTION_MACRO ~factorial~
  END
END

/* ... */
OUTER_SET factorial_index_old = 5
OUTER_SET factorial_index = 5
OUTER_SET factorial_result = 1
LAUNCH_ACTION_MACRO ~factorial~
PRINT ~%factorial_index_old%! = %factorial_result%~

The fact that variables are kept through the entire tp2 execution (formally, that they are global) is good, since you have a way of ’remembering’ the result; however, the bad part is that it may happen that variables are changed even if you didn’t want them to.
Note: risks grow exponentially as you use macros by somebody else.

By the way, another (rarely) useful feature of macros used here is that they can call themselves (formally, they are recursive).

To solve the problem with variables being changed inside a macro, I provided a rudimentary form of scoping: the aforementioned local variables list part.

Note: if ’global’ and ’local’ variables mean nothing to you (for example, if you don’t have experience in programming in real life languages) you might have problems in understanding the logic beneath the rest of this tutorial. You’ll do fine with the tutorials about standard macros.

Basically, at the beginning of the macro declaration, you may use

LOCAL_SET name = value
LOCAL_SPRINT variable string

to declare a variable as local, and assign it a new value. Use this for all variables that don’t need to be changed by the macro. After computing the macro, these variables are set to the value they had before the macro was processed. They work for both actions and patches. For example, here is a corrected factorial macro (also converted to patch):

// set ~tb#factorial_index~ to the factorial you'd like to compute,
// ~tb#factorial_result~ to 1,
// ~ftb#actorial_result~ will yield the resulting factorial.
DEFINE_PATCH_MACRO ~tb#factorial~ BEGIN
  LOCAL_SET tb#factorial_index = factorial_index
  PATCH_IF tb#factorial_index != 1 THEN
  BEGIN
    SET tb#factorial_result = tb#factorial_result * tb#factorial_index
    SET tb#factorial_index = tb#factorial_index - 1
    LAUNCH_PATCH_MACRO ~tb#factorial~
  END
END

/* ... */
SET ~tb#factorial_index~ = 5
SET ~tb#factorial_result~ = 1
LAUNCH_PATCH_MACRO ~tb#factorial~
PATCH_PRINT ~%tb#factorial_index%! = %tb#factorial_result%~

10.18  standard macros (Last Update: v188)

For your convenience, WeiDU includes some standard macros for you to use. See Macros Listing for a listing of all macros and how to invoke them in detail. Here I’ll describe the standard syntax.

In our example, we’ll use the tb#factorial macro (which is the same as the last example in the preceding tutorial).

Description (from Macros Listing): tb#factorial: computes the factorial of a number.
This is a PATCH macro.

Read the instructions on the variables to set:

SET ~tb#factorial_index~ = 5
SET ~tb#factorial_result~ = 1
LAUNCH_PATCH_MACRO ~tb#factorial~
PATCH_PRINT ~%tb#factorial_index%! = %tb#factorial_result%~

(since you’ve read the warnings from the previous tutorial, standard macros make use of LOCAL_SET/SPRINT to avoid overwriting variables that shouldn’t change).

Another example:

tb#fix_file_size: overwrites all files matching a certain regexp with a certain standard file, if they are under a certain size.
This is an ACTION macro.

So, to overwrite all item files that are smaller than 0x72 with sw1h01.itm (for example the corrupted iplot*.itm files)

OUTER_SET tb#fix_file_size_min = 0x72
OUTER_SPRINT tb#fix_file_size_target "SW1H01.ITM"
OUTER_SPRINT tb#fix_file_size_category "items"
OUTER_SPRINT tb#fix_file_size_regexp "^.*\.itm$"
LAUNCH_ACTION_MACRO ~tb#fix_file_size~

10.19  GROUP (Last update: V221)

The GROUP flag came about in discussing component management with an abnormally large number of independent components, e.g. BG2 Tweaks. Previously WeiDU lacked a satisfactory way to organize such a mod. The closest feature would be the top level ASK_EVERY_COMPONENT, which only allows for a single all-or-none approach.

The solution is a new component flag, GROUP, with the following syntax (and example):

Code:

GROUP string

Code:
BEGIN ~100% Learn Spells~
GROUP ~Convenience Tweaks~
// component code

BEGIN ~Identify All Items~
GROUP ~Convenience Tweaks~
// component code

BEGIN ~Give Edwin his BG2 Stats~
GROUP ~NPC Tweaks~
// component code

BEGIN ~ Give Jaheira her BG2 Stats~
GROUP ~NPC Tweaks~
// component code

Upon installing the mod, the player is now presented with meta-options on each group at a high level:

Code:

Would you like to display the category [Convenience Tweaks]? [Y]es/[N]o
Would you like to display the category [NPC Tweaks]? [Y]es/[N]o

Selecting [N]o on any group suppresses those options from being displayed, leading to a simpler and more controlled installer experience for the player. In the provided example, selecting [N]o to Convenience Tweaks and [Y]es to NPC Tweaks would result in WeiDU starting installation by asking to install the Give Edwin his BG2 Stats component.

GROUP operates independently of SUBCOMPONENT, meaning you can use both to organize the mod as needed. A few other items of note:

10.20  array construct

The array construct is a facile way of constructing multi-component variables. If you come from a programming background, the array construct has little in common with conventional arrays. It can be more accurately thought of as a multi-dimensional cross between an array and a dictionary.

The array construct can have any number of keys but only a single result.

The construct is formed as follows: $variable(key list)

The construct can be used to store a result when used on the left-hand side of an expression or to retrieve a result when used on the right-hand side. For example, the following code snippet illustrates how the array construct could be used to dynamically construct a dictionary at install-time. A dictionary can be used to look up an associated value for any key value included in the dictionary. Here we use it to parse kitlist.2da to construct a dictionary of which CLAB-file is associated with each kit.

COPY_EXISTING kitlist.2da override
  READ_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW kitlist 9
  FOR (i = 1; i < kitlist; ++i) BEGIN
    READ_2DA_ENTRY_FORMER kitlist i 1 kit
    READ_2DA_ENTRY_FORMER kitlist i 5 clab
    SPRINT $kitlist("%kit%") "%clab%"
  END
BUT_ONLY

Arrays can either be iterated over with the action ACTION_PHP_EACH or patch PHP_EACH.

ACTION_PHP_EACH kitlist AS kit => clab BEGIN
  PRINT "Kit %kit% uses CLAB-file %clab%"
END

You can easily make use of the dictionary properties by using the array construct on the right-hand side of the expression and inserting one of the keys found in the construct.

OUTER_SPRINT clab $kitlist(cavalier)
PRINT "The Cavalier kit uses the CLAB-file %clab%"

Using an invalid key produces the same result as trying to use an undefined variable. Using multiple keys works analogously. As a completely artificial example:

OUTER_SET $var(a b c) = 1
OUTER_SET number = $var(a b c)

The array construct can also be used to retrieve results from arrays constructed in other ways, like with ACTION_DEFINE_ARRAY or ACTION_DEFINE_ASSOCIATIVE_ARRAY. For example:

ACTION_DEFINE_ARRAY array BEGIN a b c END
OUTER_SPRINT letter $array(2)
PRINT "The second letter is %letter%" // Will print "b"

10.21  MODDER (Last update: v230)

The MODDER flag allows for more debugging info to be reported. It is suggested to leave MODDER enabled while you’re developing your mod and then disable it before you ship it to the players. However, given different coding styles, it is possible that something gets interpreted as a critical bug for some users and as expected behavior for others. For this reason, it’s possible to fine-tune the reporting level for some of the bugs that are found. This is done by writing additional modifiers after your MODDER statement, for example:

MODDER setup_tra fail area_variables none missing_extern warn

Each option can be set to either NONE, WARN or FAIL with the above syntax, with the obvious meaning. If none are chosen, WARN is assumed. WARN may generate false positives. In this case, "INSTALLED WITH WARNINGS" is not displayed.

Options set via the the command line supercede options set via the MODDER statement.

Here the list of feedback options that you can configure, along with use cases when you should deactivate them. In all other cases, using FAIL or WARN is a case of personal preference (for example, use WARN early in the development process and FAIL when you’re near the beta status).

An important note: if a tp2 sets MODDER, the debugging mode might propagate to other mods. As such, REMEMBER TO TURN MODDER OFF WHEN YOU RELEASE YOUR MOD.

10.22  READLN (Last update: v203)

This tutorial has been brought to you by plainab.

The goal of this tutorial is to explain the use of READLN within the tp2 structure. READLN can be used as an action or as a patch. My experience has been in using it as an action command. I will describe the usage of READLN and then give you some examples of its use. To put it bluntly READLN stands for "read line" and it’s use causes WeiDU to pause and read any information entered by the user on the interface screen and to then store that information within the given variable.

Syntax:

ACTION_READLN ~variable~
PATCH_READLN ~variable~

Lets build an example from scratch:

First we need to have something we want to change. For this example we will use the stack amount for item files. We could pick a high number and simply use:

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP ~.*\.itm~ ~override~
 WRITE_SHORT 0x38 9999 //stack value
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

Or we can let the end user choose how many items they want in their stacks. To do that we first need to ask the user a question.

PRINT ~How many of one item do you want to be able to be stacked?~

If we leave it at this, weidu will display the question, but keep running. We have to make weidu pause and that is where READLN comes in. So we now have:

PRINT ~How many of one item do you want to be able to be stacked?~
ACTION_READLN ~new_stack~

We can then take this entered value and use it on our copy block.

So the usage in this example would be:

BEGIN ~Modify the stack value of all items~
PRINT ~How many of one item do you want to be able to be stacked?~
ACTION_READLN ~new_stack~

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP ~.*\.itm~ ~override~
 WRITE_SHORT 0x38 %new_stack% //stack value
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

You could leave it at this and it will work, but I will tell you now that the end user can input any character from their keyboard. READLN doesn’t care what is entered, but weidu may have problems if it is expecting an integer rather than text. To get around that issue we need to add a loop that will re-ask the question when the user enters the incorrect type of information.

BEGIN ~Modify the stack value of all items~
PRINT ~How many of one item do you want to be able to be stacked?~
ACTION_READLN ~new_stack~

OUTER_WHILE NOT(IS_AN_INT %new_stack%) BEGIN
 PRINT ~How many of one item do you want to be able to be stacked?~
 ACTION_READLN ~new_stack~
END

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP ~.*\.itm~ ~override~
 WRITE_SHORT 0x38 %new_stack% //stack value
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

The loop we added looks to see if the entered value is an integer and if the entered value is not an integer then it will re-ask the question. This loop will go indefinitely until the user inputs the correct type of information. Should your user not understand why they keep getting asked the question you may wish to add new text to your questions to help them to understand what it is you are looking for. As in this example:

BEGIN ~Modify the stack value of all items~
PRINT ~How many of one item do you want to be able to be stacked?
Please enter your answer as an integer.~
ACTION_READLN ~new_stack~

OUTER_WHILE NOT(IS_AN_INT %new_stack%) BEGIN
 PRINT ~Your answer was not an integer.
Please enter your answer as an integer.
How many of one item do you want to be able to be stacked?~
 ACTION_READLN ~new_stack~
END

COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP ~.*\.itm~ ~override~
 WRITE_SHORT 0x38 %new_stack% //stack value
BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES

That is the basics on asking for information from the user and then applying that information later on in the install process. PATCH_READLN works just like ACTION_READLN only it’s location of use within the tp2 is different.


Another use of READLN is to create options that the user can choose from. Top level options are taken care of by the use of SUBCOMPONENT and/or GROUP, but since WeiDU cannot nest subcomponents, you can use READLN to offer additional choices beneath the first set of subcomponents. Here’s an example of a finished product where READLN is used to offer additional choices to a subcomponent. The relevant parts to this discussion were taken from iiProjectileRetrievalMod. I helped to create this portion of the mod. It works. I have however since learned of better methods that would eliminate some of the READLN usage from this example.

BEGIN ~Easy TUTU~
SUBCOMPONENT ~Projectile Retrieval Mod~
INCLUDE ~iiprojectiler/E22.tph~  // Easy TUTU version of mod

BEGIN ~All other Infinity Engine Games~
SUBCOMPONENT ~Projectile Retrieval Mod~

PRINT ~Please tell me how you'd like to modify your files.

1. I want to modify ALL thrown/projectiles at once.
2. I want to modify each thrown/projectile one at a time.

PLEASE ENTER  1 OR 2  ~
ACTION_READLN how
OUTER_WHILE NOT(IS_AN_INT %how%) || (%how% > 2) || (%how% < 1) BEGIN
 PRINT ~Please tell me how you'd like to modify your files.

1. I want to modify ALL thrown/projectiles at once.
2. I want to modify each thrown/projectile one at a time.

PLEASE ENTER  1 OR 2  ~
 ACTION_READLN how
END

ACTION_IF (%how% = 1) THEN BEGIN
 PRINT ~Please choose how you'd like ALL your projectiles retrieved.

1. Plain projectile only -> Plain projectile only
2. All projectiles       -> Plain projectile only
3. Each projectile       -> Each projectile
4. Magical projectiles   -> Reduced Magical/Plain projectiles

PLEASE ENTER  1, 2, 3, OR 4  ~
 ACTION_READLN choice
 OUTER_WHILE NOT(IS_AN_INT %choice%) OR (%choice% > 4) OR (%choice% < 1) BEGIN
  PRINT ~Please choose how you'd like ALL your projectiles retrieved.

1. Plain projectile only -> Plain projectile only
2. All projectiles       -> Plain projectile only
3. Each projectile       -> Each projectile
4. Magical projectiles   -> Reduced Magical/Plain projectiles

PLEASE ENTER  1, 2, 3, OR 4  ~
  ACTION_READLN choice
 END

The only drawback to using READLN when offering additional choices to the user is that there is no record within the weidu.log file as to which choices were made. Should a problem arise during game play it may be difficult to determine which choice is causing the problem, especially if the player has forgotten which choices they made. This could be solved by creating your own log file, but that is another tutorial...

10.23  Functions (Last update: V210)

Macros can have unintended side effects because they change the global variable environment. You have to be extremely careful when interacting with the “outside”.

That’s why functions were introduced in v209. Any changes to the variables are only visible inside the function. You can also provide default arguments and return values.

As with macros these functions come in an ACTION and a PATCH variant. So the corresponding commands are: DEFINE_ACTION_FUNCTION / DEFINE_PATCH_FUNCTION (both actions) and LAUNCH_ACTION_FUNCTION (action) / LAUNCH_PATCH_FUNCTION (patch).

Before you can use a function you have to DEFINE it:

DEFINE_PATCH_FUNCTION count_spells INT_VAR level = 1 STR_VAR type = "WI" RET num BEGIN
    SET num = 0
    PATCH_IF (~%SOURCE_EXT%~ STRING_EQUAL_CASE ~CRE~) THEN BEGIN
        // do some magic here that actually counts the number of spells and sets
        // the variable num to that number.
    END
END

After that you can LAUNCH it:

COPY_EXISTING ~my.cre~ ~override~
    // count number of level 1 wizard spells (default arguments of the function)
    LAUNCH_PATCH_FUNCTION count_spells RET lvl1_wizard = num END
    // and now the level 5 priest spells
    SET level = 5
    SPRINT type = "PR"
    LAUNCH_PATCH_FUNCTION count_spells RET lvl5_priest = num END

    PATCH_PRINT ~This CRE has %lvl1_wizard% level 1 wizard spells and %lvl5_priest% level 5 priest spells~

Notice that arguments are passed indirectly to the function. It inherits the variable environment from the caller. So when you launch it, all variables that are visible at that point are also visible from within the function.

You can provide default values for variables with INT_VAR (integers) and STR_VAR (strings). If the variable was not defined in the caller’s environment the default value is used.

Any variables you change inside the function will revert back to their old value after the function finishes. That’s why you have to specify what values should be return values. You can do this in the RET part of the function definition (RET num). When you launch the function you can use these variables to import the value into your current variable environment (RET lvl1_wizard = num). Separate the variables with a space character if you have multiple return values.

If you don’t need certain features simply omit them:

DEFINE_ACTION_FUNCTION xyz INT_VAR x = 1 y = 2 z = 3 BEGIN
    PRINT ~x: %x%, y: %y%, z: %z%~
END

LAUNCH_ACTION_FUNCTION xyz END

Starting from V210, you can also specify a variable that will be local to the function environment, without being passed back to the calling environment, by adding either STR_VAR or INT_VAR to the LAUNCH bit:

DEFINE_ACTION_FUNCTION xyz INT_VAR x = 1 y = 2 z = 3 BEGIN
    PRINT ~x: %x%, y: %y%, z: %z%~
END

LAUNCH_ACTION_FUNCTION xyz INT_VAR x = 0 END

OUTER_SET y = 5
LAUNCH_ACTION_FUNCTION xyz INT_VAR y END // synonym for INT_VAR y = y

10.24  GET_OFFSET_ARRAY and GET_OFFSET_ARRAY2 (last edit: 218)

Many thanks to Wisp for providing this tutorial.

GET_OFFSET_ARRAY and GET_OFFSET_ARRAY2 are means for obtaining information about certain types of file structures without using the usual READs, FORs etc. GET_OFFSET_ARRAY can, for example, be used to find the starting offsets for all the extended headers (abilities) in an item, while GET_OFFSET_ARRAY2 can be used to find the starting offsets for all extended effects in the item. Since the effect structure is organised by the ability structure, GET_OFFSET_ARRAY2 is conventionally used together with GET_OFFSET_ARRAY.

The seven values required by GET_OFFSET_ARRAY are:

1. Offset
2. Read length of "Offset"
3. Iterations
4. Read length of "Iterations"
5. Index
6. Read length of "Index"
7. Length between iterations.

Acceptable values for read length are 0 (don’t read), 2 (SHORT) and 4 (LONG). Length between iterations depends on the file structure you are working with. In our item example, length between iterations is 0x38 while we are using GET_OFFSET_ARRAY. If we were working with a spell instead, it would be 0x28.

In the item example, "Offset" is 0x64, which gives the ability offset when read. The value read from "Iterations" is the number reads that should be performed. "Iterations" is 0x68 in the item example, which gives the number of abilities when read. The value read from "Index" is the number of iterations into the file the current read should be made. This is not always relevant for GET_OFFSET_ARRAY, but for reading general effects (on-equip effects), this is 0x6e.

GET_OFFSET_ARRAY2 requires an additional value. Let’s call it Offset2. This value is normally obtained as the result from GET_OFFSET_ARRAY. In our item example this value is the starting offset for the current ability. The value of "Offset" is now 0x6a, which gives the effect offset. The value of "Iterations" is now 0x1e, which gives the number of effects, the value of "Index" is now 0x20 and both are read from Offset2 + value (unlike GET_OFFSET_ARRAY where they are read from the start of the file).

For example, if we wanted to know how many levels Blackrazor can drain, we could use this code:

COPY_EXISTING miscbc.itm override
  GET_OFFSET_ARRAY ab_array 0x64 4 0x68 2 0 0 0x38
  PHP_EACH ab_array AS int => ab_off BEGIN
    GET_OFFSET_ARRAY2 fx_array ab_off ITM_V10_HEAD_EFFECTS
    PHP_EACH fx_array AS int => fx_off BEGIN
      READ_SHORT fx_off fx_type
      PATCH_IF fx_type = 216 BEGIN
        READ_LONG fx_off + 0x4 amount
        PATCH_PRINT "I drain %amount% level(s)"
      END
    END
  END
BUT_ONLY

10.25  MATCH and TRY (last edit: 225)

MATCH is the equivalent of switch..case in mainstream languages (except it also works on strings, similar to OCaml’s match..with). This is a type of selection control statement whose purpose is to allow the value of a variable or expression to control the flow of program execution via a multiway branch. The main reasons for using this type of statement include improving clarity and reducing otherwise repetitive coding.

TRY is used to detect TP2 failures (= anything that blocks the installation and prints "NOT INSTALLED DUE TO ERRORS") and allows the modder to run custom code (without forcibly failing the installation). The syntax is very similar to MATCH, which is why these two commands are presented together.

This tutorial documents ACTION_MATCH and ACTION_TRY, but the patch equivalents (PATCH_MATCH and PATCH_TRY) are also available.

This is a sample code for MATCH:

ACTION_MATCH 12 + 14 // value
WITH
  15 16 // guards
  BEGIN
    PRINT ~15 or 16~ // guarded actions
  END
  15 + 5 ~str.*with%vars% and regexp~
  BEGIN
    PRINT ~15 + 5 or matches "str.*with%vars% and regexp"~
  END
  DEFAULT
    PRINT ~default~ // default actions
END

To begin with, the value (12 + 14) is evaluated (can be any integer or a string). After that, it is compared against each guard: it is neither 15 nor 16, so its guarded action is not executed. Similarly, it is neither 15 + 5 (= 20) nor does it match the regexp ~str.*with%vars% and regexp~ after evaluating variables and case-insensitive regexp, so its guarded actions aren’t executed either. Since no listed value is printed, the default action(s) are executed (in this case, PRINT ~default~).

MATCH can also compare against strings:

OUTER_SET var = 15
ACTION_MATCH ~string%var%~
WITH
  ~string12~ ~string2.*~
  BEGIN
    PRINT ~string12 or string2.*~
  END
  ~string1[12345]~
  BEGIN
    PRINT ~string1[12345]~
  END
  DEFAULT
    PRINT ~default~
END

In this case, PRINT ~string1[12345]~ is executed.

Guards can also have a condition associated; in that case, the value must match against one of the guards and the condition must be true:

ACTION_MATCH ~%something%~
WITH
  ~none~ WHEN GAME_IS ~BG1 TotSC~
  BEGIN
    // ~none~ and the game is BG1
  END
  ~none~
  BEGIN
    // ~none~ and the game is not BG1
  END
  DEFAULT
    // not ~none~
END

It is also possible to have a condition without a guard, in which case the syntax is:

ACTION_MATCH ~%something%~
WITH
  ANY GAME_IS ~BG1 TotSC~
  BEGIN
    // the game is BG1
  END
  ANY GAME_IS ~SoA ToB~
  BEGIN
    // the game is BG2
  END
  DEFAULT
    // not BG1 or BG2
END

Specific cases that might be worth mentioning: it is possible for a guarded action to be empty, to have no default actions, or to only have default actions, as per the following examples:

ACTION_MATCH ~%something%~
WITH
  ~no action~ ~none~ ~empty~ ~~
  BEGIN
    // empty guarded action: default action never executed
  END
  ~error~
  BEGIN
    FAIL ~error~
  END
  DEFAULT
    DO_THIS_AND_THAT
END

ACTION_MATCH ~%something%~
WITH
  ~value1~ ~value2~ ~value3~
  BEGIN
    DO_SOMETHING
  END
  ~error~
  BEGIN
    FAIL ~error~
  END
  DEFAULT
    // no default action: nothing is done for unmatched values
END

ACTION_MATCH ~%something%~
WITH
  DEFAULT
    // no guarded actions, only default actions: always executed
    DO_THIS_AND_THAT
END

Also, no more than one group of actions is executed:

ACTION_MATCH ~string123~
WITH
  ~string123~
  BEGIN
    DO_THIS // executed
  END
  ~string123~
  BEGIN
    DO_THAT // not executed
  END
  DEFAULT
    DO_BOTH // also not executed
END





TRY is similar to MATCH:

ACTION_TRY
  COPY ~override/sw1h01.itm~ ~override~
  DO_SOMETHING_ELSE
WITH
  ~Unix.Unix_error(20, "stat", "override/sw1h01.itm")~
  BEGIN
    PRINT ~I caught sw1h01.itm not found!~
  END
  ~Unix.Unix_error(20, "stat", "override/.*.itm")~
  BEGIN
    PRINT ~I caught another missing item!~
  END
  DEFAULT
    PRINT ~I caught another error!~
END

The actions in ACTION_TRY are executed. If none of those fails, the WITH part is skipped; otherwise, the error message is printed as usual (use SILENT), the exception text (from the ERROR: blah blah line) is saved to the %ERROR_MESSAGE% variable, and a MATCH is executed on that.

After running the correct error handling code, execution continues after the end of the ACTION_TRY block. If you still want to block the installation, use ACTION_RERAISE (in theory, you could use FAIL ~%ERROR_MESSAGE%~, but this changes the exception and its text, which would cause you headaches when nesting multiple TRYs).

10.26  QUICK_MENU (last edit: 227)

This tp2 flag is used to define groups of components that the user will be offered to install in a single step. Sample code:

QUICK_MENU
  ALWAYS_ASK 5 END
  ~Red~ BEGIN 1 2 END
  ~Green~ BEGIN 2 3 END
  ~Blue~ BEGIN 4 6 END
END

The user will be presented with the following prompt:

The test/test.tp2 mod has 13 distinct optional components.
To save time, you can choose what to do with them at a high level rather than being asked about each one.

[A]sk about each component, [S]kip all, or choose a pre-defined selection:
 1] Red
 2] Green
 3] Blue

If some mod components were already installed, the option to [U]ninstall or [R]einstall the currently installed components will also be offered.

If the user chooses to install a pre-defined selection, then its components will be installed, and ALL other components of the mod will be uninstalled if already installed.

Components in ALWAYS_ASK will always be asked for individually if the user chose to install one of the pre-defined selections (or, of course, if he chose [A]). If the user chose [S], [R] or [U] the same action will be applied to the components in ALWAYS_ASK.

Caveats:

10.27  HANDLE_AUDIO and HANDLE_TILESETS

HANDLE_AUDIO and HANDLE_TILESETS are convenience functions for the common tasks of installing mod-supplied audio and tilesets. All IE games are supported and the specifics for each game is handled automatically. The functions are designed to take care of as many as the platform-specific details as possible, including the differences between Windows, OS X and GNU/Linux.

There is one exception to this, however. At present, to use HANDLE_AUDIO you need to include oggdec.exe for Windows and SoX for OS X in your mod. To use HANDLE_TILESETS you need to include tisunpack for Windows and OS X. In both cases it is recommended that GNU/Linux users install oggdec and tisunpack themselves. Most modern GNU/Linux distributions come with oggdec already installed. A copy of tisunpack compiled for GNU/Linux is distributed together with the Linux version of WeiDU. If you want to facilitate the installation of your mod on GNU/Linux, you should state that your mod depends on oggdec or tisunpack, as appropriate.

HANDLE_AUDIO expects your audio to be in the Ogg Vorbis format. If you have WAV or WAVC files, you do not need HANDLE_AUDIO, you can simply copy them to the override.

With no configuration, HANDLE_AUDIO expects your audio, oggdec.exe and SoX to be located in mymod/audio. Using HANDLE_AUDIO is then as simple as a single line of TP2:

LAF HANDLE_AUDIO END

LAF is an alias for LAUNCH_ACTION_FUNCTION. HANDLE_AUDIO is a completely independent function, and does not have no be placed before or after anything else in your TP2 file. It is equivalent to a TP2 action and you obviously need to place it in the right component, but that is it.

HANDLE_AUDIO can also be configured to use audio in a different directory, through the string variable audio_path. The value of this variable is the directory in which HANDLE_AUDIO should look for audio, oggdec.exe and SoX. So, for instance, if you keep your sounds in mymod/sound you would configure HANDLE_AUDIO like so:

LAF HANDLE_AUDIO STR_VAR audio_path = ~mymod/sound~ END

If you want HANDLE_AUDIO to look for oggdec.exe or SoX in another directory than audio_path, you can use the oggdec_path and sox_path variables. For example, if you have your voice-overs in mymod/audio/vo, your music in mymod/audio/music, and oggdec.exe and SoX in mymod/audio you could install it like so:

LAF HANDLE_AUDIO
  STR_VAR
    audio_path = ~mymod/audio/vo~
    oggdec_path = ~mymod/audio~
    sox_path = ~mymod/audio~
END
LAF HANDLE_AUDIO
  INT_VAR
    music = 1
  STR_VAR
    audio_path = ~mymod/audio/music~
    oggdec_path = ~mymod/audio~
    sox_path = ~mymod/audio~
END

The integer variable music simply tells HANDLE_AUDIO that you want the audio handled as music. This only makes a difference on BGEE.

The function HANDLE_TILESETS follow the same design as HANDLE_AUDIO. HANDLE_TILESETS decompresses and installs TIZ files rather than OGG files and uses tisunpack rather than oggdec/SoX.

With no configuration, HANDLE_TILESETS expects your TIZ files to be located in mymod/tiz. Additionally, it expects tisunpack for Windows to be located in mymod/tiz/win32 and tisunpack for OS X to be located in mymod/tiz/osx. You install you tilesets like so:

LAF HANDLE_TILESETS END

The string variables tiz_path and tisunpack_path allow you to configure HANDLE_TILESETS to look for TIZ files or tisunpack in other directories. Note that you do not specify the individual directories for tisunpack for Windows or tisunpack for OS X. Instead you specify the parent directory and WeiDU will then use the value of the variable WEIDU_OS to find the right version of tisunpack. For example, if you keep your TIZ files in mymod/tilesets and tisunpack for Windows in mymod/bin/win32 and tisunpack for OS X in mymod/bin/osx you could install your tilesets like so:

LAF HANDLE_TILESETS
  STR_VAR
    tiz_path = ~mymod/tilesets~
    tizunpack_path = ~mymod/bin~
END

To conclude this tutorial, here is a fictional (but valid) example of a TP2 file of a mod where HANDLE_AUDIO and HANDLE_TILESETS are used:

BACKUP ~fl#xmpl/backup~
AUTHOR ~Wisp~

BEGIN ~E. G. McExample NPC~

COPY ~fl#xmpl/copy~ override

COMPILE ~fl#xmpl/compile~

LAF HANDLE_AUDIO END

LAF HANDLE_TILESETS END

COPY ~fl#xmpl/character/fl#xmpl.cre~ override
  SAY NAME1 ~E. G. McExample~
  SAY NAME2 ~E. G. McExample~
  // Other SAYs

// End of File

11  Code dumps

This section contains code snippets that serve to document functionality not covered elsewhere.

These snippets are provided by Miloch.

//For each dialogue, change GivePartyGold() to GiveGoldForce() actions
ACTION_FOR_EACH dialog IN ~arkion~ ~ardrou~ ~berrun~ ~brevli~ ~brielb~ ~forthe~ ~gurke~ BEGIN
  ACTION_IF FILE_EXISTS_IN_GAME ~%dialog%.dlg~ BEGIN
    COPY_EXISTING ~%dialog%.dlg~ ~override~
      PATCH_IF SOURCE_SIZE > 0x34 BEGIN
        DECOMPILE_DLG_TO_D
        REPLACE_TEXTUALLY CASE_INSENSITIVE EXACT_MATCH ~GivePartyGold~ ~GiveGoldForce~
        COMPILE_D_TO_DLG
      END
    BUT_ONLY
  END
END

//Compress a BAM
COPY ~bambatch/bam~ ~bambatch/bam~
  READ_ASCII 0x0 sg (4) //Signature
  PATCH_IF (~%sg%~ STRING_EQUAL_CASE ~BAM ~ = 1) BEGIN
    dl = SOURCE_SIZE //Data length
    COMPRESS_REPLACE_FILE 0 dl 9
    INSERT_BYTES 0x0 0xc
    WRITE_ASCII 0x0 ~BAMCV1  ~
    WRITE_LONG 0x8 dl
  END ELSE BEGIN
    PATCH_PRINT ~%SOURCE_FILE% is not an uncompressed BAM.~
  END
BUT_ONLY

//Decompress a BAM
COPY ~bambatch/bam~ ~bambatch/bam~
  READ_ASCII 0x0 sg (4) //Signature
  PATCH_IF (~%sg%~ STRING_EQUAL_CASE ~BAMC~ = 1) BEGIN
    READ_LONG 0x8 dl //Uncompressed data length
    DECOMPRESS_REPLACE_FILE 0xc (SOURCE_SIZE - 0xc) dl
  END ELSE BEGIN
    PATCH_PRINT ~%SOURCE_FILE% is not a compressed BAM.~
  END
BUT_ONLY

//Defines an array associating creatures with a new amount of gold
ACTION_DEFINE_ASSOCIATIVE_ARRAY newgold BEGIN
  ~arkion~ => 100
  ~ardrou~ => 10
  ~berrun~ => 58
  ~brevli~ => 5
  ~brielb~ => 200
  ~gurke~ => 20
  ~oublek~ => 1000
  ~perdue%~ => 75
  ~pheirk%~ => 38
  ~scar~ => 1026
  ~sonner~ => 150
  ~wenric~ => 170
  ~jarlaxle~ => 25
  ~ppsime~ => 50
  ~yschearl~ => 150
END

//Writes the new amount of gold for each creature above if it exists
ACTION_PHP_EACH newgold AS crename => gold BEGIN
  ACTION_IF FILE_EXISTS_IN_GAME ~%crename%.cre~ BEGIN
    COPY_EXISTING ~%crename%.cre~ ~override~
      PATCH_IF SOURCE_SIZE > 0x2d3 BEGIN
        WRITE_LONG 0x1c gold
      END
    BUT_ONLY
  END
END

12  Macros Listing

These macros are automatically shipped with WeiDU.

tb#factorial: computes the factorial of a number.
This is a PATCH macro.

tb#fix_file_size: overwrites all files matching a certain regexp with a certain standard file, if they are under a certain size.
This is an ACTION macro.


Note that, differently from the standalone versions, for these macros you need to set all the needed values - they aren’t initialized automatically. This is untrue functions (they are initialized to either 0 or the empty string, except for probability1 which is initialized to 100).

DELETE_SPELL_EFFECT: deletes all extended effects with specified opcode from a spell. This is a PATCH macro and function.

DELETE_ITEM_EFFECT: deletes all extended effects with specified opcode from an item. This is a PATCH macro and function.

DELETE_ITEM_EQEFFECT: deletes all equipping effects with specified opcode from an item. This is a PATCH macro and function.

DELETE_CRE_EFFECT: deletes all effects with specified opcode from a creature. (Warning: doesn’t check EFF version) This is a PATCH macro and function.

ITEM_EFFECT_TO_SPELL: copies all extended effects from the current item to the first extended header of a spell. This is a PATCH macro and function.

ADD_SPELL_EFFECT: adds an extended effect to a spell. All variables except probability1 and insert_point are 0 by default. This is a PATCH macro and function.

ADD_ITEM_EFFECT: adds an extended effect to an item. All variables except probability1, type and insert_point are 0 by default. This is a PATCH macro and function.

ADD_ITEM_EQEFFECT: adds an equipping effect to an item. All variables except probability1 are 0 by default. This is a PATCH macro and function.

ADD_SPELL_CFEFFECT: adds a casting-feature effect to a spell. All variables except probability1 are 0 by default. This is a PATCH macro and function.

ADD_CRE_EFFECT: adds an effect to a creature. All variables except probability1 are 0 by default. This is a PATCH macro and function.

DELETE_CRE_ITEM: deletes all matching items from a creature. Regexp allowed. This is a PATCH macro and function.

DELETE_STORE_ITEM: deletes all matching items from a store. Regexp allowed. This is a PATCH macro and function.

DELETE_AREA_ITEM: deletes all matching items from an area. Regexp allowed. This is a PATCH macro and function.

REPLACE_STORE_ITEM: replaces all matching items in a store with another item. Regexp allowed. This is a PATCH macro and function.

REPLACE_AREA_ITEM: replaces all matching items in an area with another item. Regexp allowed. This is a PATCH macro and function.

ADD_AREA_ITEM: adds an item to a container of an area. This is a PATCH macro and function.

ADD_CRE_ITEM_FLAGS: adds flags to all matching items possessed by a creature. Regexp allowed. This is a PATCH macro and function.

REMOVE_CRE_ITEM_FLAGS: removes flags from all matching items possessed by a creature. Regexp allowed. This is a PATCH macro and function.

SET_CRE_ITEM_FLAGS: set flags to all matching items possessed by a creature. Regexp allowed. This is a PATCH macro and function.

READ_SOUNDSET: reads soundset of a creature and stores it as an array of string references This is an ACTION macro.

WRITE_SOUNDSET: writes soundset to all matching creatures. Regexp allowed. This is an ACTION macro.

FJ_CRE_VALIDITY: Checks whether a CRE file is well-formed or not, fixes some common bugs, and reports whether the CRE file is still broken or not. In particular:

This is a PATCH function.

FJ_CRE_REINDEX: reorders creatures with nonstandard offset orders. Called by FJ_CRE_VALIDITY automatically if relevant.

This is a PATCH function.

FJ_CRE_EFF_V2: Converts creatures using version 1 effects to version 2. Called by FJ_CRE_VALIDITY or FJ_CRE_REINDEX automatically if relevant.
This is a PATCH function.

T-CRE_EFF_V1: Converts creatures using version 2 effects to version 1. Called by FJ_CRE_VALIDITY or FJ_CRE_REINDEX automatically if relevant.
This is a PATCH function.

ADD_AREA_REGION_TRIGGER: adds an area region to the current are file. This is a PATCH macro and function. Unlike other macros you do not need to set every variable. You are only required to set those values that you need to write.


The vertex points are separated by their XY values You may have as many pairs as you need. Just copy this set and increment the #. Example: For the X values: ab_RT_Vx_X_0, ab_RT_Vx_X_1, ab_RT_Vx_X_2
For the Y values: ab_RT_Vx_Y_0, ab_RT_Vx_Y_1, ab_RT_Vx_Y_2


NOTE: The original code released in WeiDU v211 has been overhauled and re-released in v212. Therefore, the user defined variable names have been changed. If you used the 211 version you will need to update your mod to use the variables in this version. Sorry for the inconvenience...


RES_NUM_OF_SPELL_NAME: converts a spell.ids reference to resource name. This is an ACTION and PATCH macro and function.


RES_NAME_OF_SPELL_NUM: converts a spell.ids reference to resource name. This is an ACTION and PATCH macro and function.


NAME_NUM_OF_SPELL_RES: converts a spell resource name to a spell.ids reference. This is an ACTION and PATCH macro and function.


GET_UNIQUE_FILE_NAME: Creates a file name that is currently unallocated. This is a PATCH and ACTION function. This function will create a filename using __ as a prefix. __ is reserved by The Bigg and writeable by anybody, as long as you dynamically create the file name (either by using this function or other code of your devising). The algorithm creates file names in base 36, going from __0000.ext to __zzzz.ext; this allows for 36 ^ 4 = 1679616 unique file names.

To allow users to reinstall your mod without breaking the identity of these files, you can use the ’base’ parameter to ensure that the same thing will be mapped to the same file on reinstalls. For instance, if you’re iterating through Mages to give each of them a spellbook, base should contain your modder prefix, an identifier for the purpose of the call, and the file name you’re working on, for instance: ~tb#spellbooks_%SOURCE_RES%~


ALTER_AREA_ENTRANCE: patch coordinates and orientation of area party entrance points. This is a PATCH function. For all integer variables, a negative value results in no change to that field and the default value is -1. The variable entrance_name is required.


ALTER_AREA_REGION: patch area regions, also known as area triggers. This is a PATCH function. For all integer variables except info_point, a negative value results in no change and the default value is -1. The variable info_point results in no change if it has the default value 99999999. In the case of flags, a value of 1 will set the flag and a value of 0 will unset it. For all string variables except region_name, the default value is the string "same", which results in no change to that field. The variable region_name is required.


ALTER_AREA_ACTOR: patch area actors. This is a PATCH function. All integer variables, except expiry, default to the value -1 and a negative value results in no change to the corresponding field. The variable expiry instead has a default value of -2. In the case of flags, a value of 1 will set the flag and a value of 0 will unset it. All string variables except actor_name default to the string "same", which results in no change to the corresponding field. The variable actor_name is required.


ALTER_AREA_CONTAINER: patch area containers, but not their contents. This is a PATCH function. All integer variables default to -1 and negative values result in no change to the corresponding field. In the case of flags, a value of 1 will set the flag and a value of 0 will unset it. All string variables except container_name default to the string "same", which results in no change to the corresponding field. The variable container_name is required.


ALTER_AREA_DOOR: patch area doors. This is a PATCH function. All integer variables, except string_unlock and string_speaker, default to -1 and negative values result in no change to the corresponding field. The variables string_unlock and string_speaker instead default to 99999999. In the case of flags, a value of 1 will set the flag and a value of 0 will unset it. All string variables except door_name default to the string "same", which results in no change to the corresponding field. The variable door_name is required.


ALTER_ITEM_EFFECT: patch global (equipping) effects and/or effects on extended headers. This is a PATCH function. All integer variables except check_globals, check_headers, header and savebonus default to -1 and negative values result in no change to the corresponding field. The integer variables check_globals, check_headers and header default to 0. The integer variable savebonus defaults to -11 and values lower than -10 result in no change to the corresponding field. The string variable resource defaults to the string "same", which results in no change to the corresponding field.

Note that both check_globals and check_headers are 0 by default, so you need to change one or both of these to 1 to perform any patching at all. If you patch headers, you can further target by using type to target melee, ranged, or magical headers. match_opcode can be left at -1 to match all effects on your targeted range or targeted to a specific opcode. If the opcode itself needs to be changed, you can use match_opcode to target the existing effect and new_opcode as the new opcode to use. duration_high is an alternative to duration, mainly for changing the overall duration of an item’s effects. The idea is to allow you to mass patch effects to new durations while leaving the one-time only cosmetics and visuals--which are usual instant or only run for a few seconds--unchanged.


ALTER_ITEM_HEADER: patch ability headers on items. This is a PATCH function. All integer variables except match_icon and header default to -1 and negative values result in no change to the corresponding field. The integer variables match_icon and header default to 0. In the case of flags, a value of 1 will set the flag and a value of 0 will unset it. The string variable icon defaults to the string "same", which results in no change to the corresponding field.

header_type is used to limit the scope of matching. The default value of -1 will match all types of headers while values of 0-4 will match headers with those values. If match_icon is 1, the icon resource reference will be match with the icon variable as an additional qualifier. This is useful for items which have multiple magic abilities. header can also be used to limit patching to the Nth header, counting from 1 as the first header. The default is 0, which will match all headers.


DELETE_ITEM_HEADER: delete ability headers, also known as extended headers, from items. This is a PATCH function. All integer variables default to 0.

This function will delete one or more ability headers, along with all of their associated effects, and properly re-index the file.


ALTER_SPELL_EFFECT: patch effects on spells. This is a PATCH function. All integer variables except check_globals, check_headers, header and savebonus default to -1 and negative values result in no change to the corresponding field. The integer variables check_globals and header default to 0. The integer variable check_headers defaults to 1. The integer variable savebonus defaults to -11 and values lower than -10 result in no change to the corresponding field. The string variable resource defaults to the string "same", which results in no change to the corresponding field.

The function will by default only check effects on headers. You can change this by changing the values of the variables check_globals and check_headers. If you patch headers, you can further target by using type to target melee, ranged, or magical headers. match_opcode can be left at -1 to match all effects on your targeted range or targeted to a specific opcode. If the opcode itself needs to be changed, you can use match_opcode to target the existing effect and new_opcode as the new opcode to use. duration_high is an alternative to duration, mainly for changing the overall duration of an item’s effects. The idea is to allow you to mass patch effects to new durations while leaving the one-time only cosmetics and visuals--which are usual instant or only run for a few seconds--unchanged.


ALTER_SPELL_HEADER: patch ability headers on spells. This is a PATCH function.All integer variables except match_icon and header default to -1 and negative values result in no change to the corresponding field. The integer variables match_icon and header default to 0. The string variable icon defaults to the string "same", which results in no change to the corresponding field.

header_type is used to limit the scope of matching. The default value of -1 will match all types of headers while values of 0-4 will match headers with those values. If match_icon is 1, the icon resource reference will be match with the icon variable as an additional qualifier. This is useful for items which have multiple magic abilities. header can also be used to limit patching to the Nth header, counting from 1 as the first header. The default is 0, which will match all headers.


DELETE_SPELL_HEADER: delete ability headers, also known as extended headers, from spells. This is a PATCH function. The integer variable header_type defaults to 0. The integer variable min_level defaults to -1 and if this variable is 0 or greater, only headers with a matching minimum level will be deleted.

This function will delete one or more ability headers, along with all of their associated effects, and properly re-index the file.


CLONE_EFFECT: This is a patch function for creature, item, or spell files that will match an existing effect and create a new one based on the matched effect. Numerous variables are available for matching the specified effect and for specifying new values in the new effect based on the matched effect.

The first batch of variables are meta-variables which will help determine the scope of the function:

The next batch of variables sets the function boundaries on matching an effect to clone. Any variables not specified will not be used to determine a match. The function will only determine an effect is a match only if ALL of the variables specified are matched.

Once a matching effect is found, a new effect is created (STR_VAR insert determines its placement) with all of the same specifications as the matched effect. The next series of variables allows the function to change the fields to new values in the newly-created effect. Any variables not set in this batch will simply inherit their values from the matched effect.


DELETE_EFFECT: This is a patch function for creature, item, or spell files that will match an existing effect and then delete it. Numerous variables are available for matching the specified effect.

The first batch of variables are meta-variables which will help determine the scope of the function:

The next batch of variables sets the function boundaries on matching an effect to delete. Any variables not specified will not be used to determine a match. The function will only determine an effect is a match only if ALL of the variables specified are matched.

Once a matching effect is found it is deleted. The function will continue to delete effects from the stack until the number of effects deleted matches the multi_match variable.

ALTER_EFFECT: This is a patch function for creature, item, or spell files that will match an existing effect and alter it based on the defined variables. Numerous variables are available for matching the specified effect and for specifying new values.

The first batch of variables are meta-variables which will help determine the scope of the function:

The next batch of variables sets the function boundaries on matching an effect to alter. Any variables not specified will not be used to determine a match. The function will only determine an effect is a match only if ALL of the variables specified are matched.

Once a matching effect is found, the next series of variables allows the function to change the fields to these new values in the matched effect. Any variables not set in this batch will keep their existing values.


SUBSTRING: returns a substring of the provided string. This is an ACTION and PATCH function. All integer variables default to 0.

The function will fail with an error if either start or length are negative or if any of start, length or the sum of the two is greater than the length of string.


ADD_CRE_SCRIPT: assigns a script to a creature in the first available slot. This is a PATCH function. By default, the function will try all 5 script slots from SCRIPT_OVERRIDE to SCRIPT_DEFAULT.

The function will fail with an error if the file being patched does not have a signature (first 3 bytes) that case-sensitively equals CRE, if either offset_start or offset_end are negative, if offset_end is less than offset_start or if offset_end is greater than the size of the file being patched.


HANDLE_AUDIO: install Ogg--Vorbis compressed audio files in a safe and easy manner. This is an ACTION function.

This function supports Windows, OS X, GNU/Linux and all IE games, including BG:EE. If the game is not BG:EE, the audio will be decompressed and the resulting .wav files will be MOVEd to the override. If the game is BG:EE, the .ogg files are copied into the override and renamed into .wav files. Refer to the HANDLE_AUDIO and HANDLE_TILESETS tutorial for usage examples and a more practical explanation.

If the audio files need to be decompressed, this function will use oggdec.exe on Windows, which is by default expected to be found in audio_path. The most recent version of oggdec can be downloaded here (direct link). On OS X, SoX will be used, which is by default also expected to be found in audio_path. SoX compiled for OS X can be downloaded here. On GNU/Linux, oggdec will be used, but it is expected to be found on the system path and the user should install it him/herself. If you provide installation instructions for GNU/Linux, just include something to the effect of “install oggdec, which is usually part of the package vorbis-tools”.

If the decompression utility cannot be found, the user is warned that the audio files were not installed.


HANDLE_TILESETS: install TISpack-compressed tilesets in a safe and easy manner. This is an ACTION function.

This function supports Windows, OS X, GNU/Linux and all IE games that support the TIS V1 file format. The program tisunpack, part of TISpack, is used to decompress the provided .tiz files and the resulting .tis files are placed in the override. Refer to the HANDLE_AUDIO and HANDLE_TILESETS tutorial for usage examples and a more practical explanation.

This function expects to find tisunpack for one or more of Windows, OS X or GNU/Linux in a common directory under the subdirectories win32, osx, and unix, respectively. For example, in mymod/tiz/win32, mymod/tiz/osx and mymod/tiz/unix, the common directory is mymod/tiz and mymod/tiz/win32/tisunpack.exe should be a valid file. For GNU/Linux, this function also supports tisunpack being located on the system path (something the user would take care of). If you choose to leave tisunpack to the user, you should mention this requirement in any installation instructions you provide.

If tisunpack for the user’s platform could not be found, the installation fails.


HANDLE_CHARSETS: runtime-convert TRA files into UTF-8 in a safe and easy manner. This is an ACTION function.

This function supports Windows, OS X and GNU/Linux. If the game is BG: EE or BGII: EE, TRA files are encoded into UTF-8 so the text can be installed without causing problems. HANDLE_CHARSETS needs to be used before any text is installed and is compatible with AUTO_TRA and all other methods of loading TRA files.

Conversion is handled by the program iconv. The program is available as part of the base system on OS X and GNU/Linux but a Windows version needs to be included in your mod. A Windows version can be downloaded here.

In order to function, HANDLE_CHARSETS needs to know a few things. First, you need to specify where you keep your TRA files. You do this with the variable tra_path. Second, HANDLE_CHARSETS needs to know where the Windows version of iconv is located. You do this with the variable iconv_path. Third, HANDLE_CHARSETS needs to know which character set the TRA files are in. Note that they can only be converted into UTF-8 and cannot already be in UTF-8. You provide this information with charset_table or tell HANDLE_CHARSETS to try to infer this by itself with infer_charsets. Lastly, HANDLE_CHARSETS needs to know which TRA files to convert and whether any of them should be reloaded. You can do this with noconvert_array, convert_array and reload_array.

Unless convert_array is specified, HANDLE_CHARSETS will recursively convert all TRA files in tra_path except those listed in noconvert_array. If convert_array is specified, only those TRA files listed in the array will be converted. convert_array may contain references to TRA files in subdirectories of tra_path.

Compatibility matrix for infer_charsets.

Language%LANGUAGE% containsInferred character set
Simplified ChineseschineseCP936
Traditional ChinesetchineseCP950
CzechczechCP1250
Englishenglish, americanCP1252
Frenchfrench, francaisCP1252
Germangerman, deutschCP1252
Italianitalian, italianoCP1252
JapanesejapaneseCP932
KoreankoreanCP949
Polishpolish, polskiCP1250
RussianrussianCP1251
Spanishspanish, castilian, espanol, castellanoCP1252


DELETE_WORLDMAP_LINKS: delete all links from one worldmap area to another. This is a PATCH function.

This function will delete links from one specified area to another. Links can be deleted from all four directional nodes (north, east, south, west) or from a specific node. Links connecting the areas in the opposite direction will not be deleted.


ADD_WORLDMAP_LINKS: add links from one worldmap area to another. This is a PATCH function.

This function add links from one specified area to another. Links can be added from all four directional nodes (north, east, south, west) or from a specific node. If a link already exists, its metadata (distance scale, random encounters, etc.) will be overwritten. Links connecting the areas in the opposite direction will not be added. If either of the areas do not exist in the worldmap, a warning is printed and no links are added.


UPDATE_PVRZ_INDICES: update the PVRZ references in a BAM V2 or MOS V2 resource. This is a PATCH function.

This function will update the PVRZ references in a BAM V2 or MOS V2 resource with the next contiguous block of free PVRZ indices. This function is intended to be used in combination with the action function INSTALL_PVRZ.


INSTALL_PVRZ: install a PVRZ file and updates the PVRZ index. This is an ACTION function.

This function copies the specified PVRZ file into the target folder and updates the PVRZ index. This function should be used in conjunction with UPDATE_PVRZ_INDICES.


FIND_FREE_PVRZ_INDEX: attempt to find a contiguous block of free PVRZ indices in the game installation. This is a PATCH and an ACTION function.

This function attempts to find the first available free PVRZ index of a contiguous block which guarantees to fit at least num_to_reserve indices.


DIRECTORY_OF_FILESPEC: returns the directory of a file specification. Compare to SOURCE_DIRECTORY. This is an ACTION and PATCH function.

FILE_OF_FILESPEC: returns the file of a file specification. Compare to SOURCE_FILE. This is an ACTION and PATCH function.

RES_OF_FILESPEC: returns the resource name of a file specification. Compare to SOURCE_RES. This is an ACTION and PATCH function.

EXT_OF_FILESPEC: returns the resource extension of a file specification. Compare to SOURCE_EXT. This is an ACTION and PATCH function.

12.1  fj_are_structure

Adds a structure to an area file. All variables are zero or blank by default unless otherwise indicated. Fields designated by an asterisk are typically required; all others are optional. This is a PATCH function.

Universal structure variables:

Actor structure variables:

Region structure variables:

Spawn structure variables:

Entrance structure variables:

Container structure variables:

Item structure variables:

Ambient structure variables:

Variable structure variables:

Door structure variables:

Animation structure variables:

Bitmask structure variables:

Songlist structure variables:

Rest interrupt structure variables

Map note structure variables:

Projectile trap structure variables:

A few examples best illustrate the use of this function.

Example 1: add an actor to an area

COPY_EXISTING ar0500.are override
  LPF fj_are_structure
    INT_VAR
    fj_loc_x          = 2780
    fj_loc_y          = 1955
    fj_dest_x         = 2780
    fj_dest_y         = 1955
    fj_animation      = 0x6110 //fighter female human
    fj_orientation    = 15     //SSE
    STR_VAR
    fj_structure_type = actor
    fj_name           = Aurora
    fj_cre_resref     = agaurora
  END

Example 2: add a region to an area (in this case, a travel trigger to another area)

  LPF fj_are_structure
    INT_VAR
    fj_type         = 2    //travel
    fj_box_left     = 3415
    fj_box_top      = 625
    fj_box_right    = 3450
    fj_box_bottom   = 700
    fj_cursor_idx   = 30   //door
    fj_vertex_0     = 3415 + (625 << 16)
    fj_vertex_1     = 3450 + (650 << 16)
    fj_vertex_2     = 3450 + (700 << 16)
    fj_vertex_3     = 3415 + (676 << 16)
    STR_VAR
    fj_structure_type   = region
    fj_name             = Tran0540
    fj_destination_area = ag0540
    fj_destination_name = Exit0500
  END

Example 3: add an entrance (from another area) to an area

  LPF fj_are_structure
    INT_VAR
    fj_loc_x       = 3490
    fj_loc_y       = 655
    fj_orientation = 10   //NE
    STR_VAR
    fj_structure_type = entrance
    fj_name           = Exit0540
  END

Example 4: add a container to an area, then add an item to the new container

  LPF fj_are_structure
    INT_VAR
    fj_type        = 8 //nonvisible
    fj_loc_x       = 4388
    fj_loc_y       = 2876
    fj_box_left    = 4372
    fj_box_top     = 2826
    fj_box_right   = 4420
    fj_box_bottom  = 2858
    fj_trap_loc_x  = 4380
    fj_trap_loc_y  = 2870
    fj_vertex_0    = 4411 + (2858 << 16)
    fj_vertex_1    = 4372 + (2845 << 16)
    fj_vertex_2    = 4382 + (2826 << 16)
    fj_vertex_3    = 4420 + (2839 << 16)
    STR_VAR
    fj_structure_type = container
    fj_name           = ~Cornerstone~
  END
  LPF fj_are_structure
    INT_VAR
    fj_con_itm_idx    = SHORT_AT 0x74 - 1 // a new container will be last in the file
    fj_flags          = 1 // identified
    STR_VAR
    fj_name           = c6lantho
    fj_structure_type = itm
  END

Example 5: add a door to an area

  LPF fj_are_structure
    INT_VAR
    fj_flags               = 0b100000000
    fj_open_box_left       = 520
    fj_open_box_top        = 724
    fj_open_box_right      = 545
    fj_open_box_bottom     = 830
    fj_closed_box_left     = 507
    fj_closed_box_top      = 761
    fj_closed_box_right    = 562
    fj_closed_box_bottom   = 869
    fj_cursor_idx          = 30
    fj_trap_loc_x          = 500
    fj_trap_loc_y          = 852
    fj_open_loc_x          = 517
    fj_open_loc_y          = 881
    fj_closed_loc_x        = 562
    fj_closed_loc_y        = 814
    fj_door_open_vert_0    = 520 + (826 << 16)
    fj_door_open_vert_1    = 527 + (830 << 16)
    fj_door_open_vert_2    = 545 + (798 << 16)
    fj_door_open_vert_3    = 545 + (727 << 16)
    fj_door_open_vert_4    = 539 + (724 << 16)
    fj_door_open_vert_5    = 520 + (750 << 16)
    fj_door_closed_vert_0  = 507 + (831 << 16)
    fj_door_closed_vert_1  = 562 + (869 << 16)
    fj_door_closed_vert_2  = 562 + (799 << 16)
    fj_door_closed_vert_3  = 507 + (761 << 16)
    fj_cell_open_vert_0    = 32 + (68 << 16)
    fj_cell_open_vert_1    = 33 + (67 << 16)
    fj_cell_open_vert_2    = 32 + (67 << 16)
    fj_cell_closed_vert_0  = 32 + (70 << 16)
    fj_cell_closed_vert_1  = 33 + (71 << 16)
    fj_cell_closed_vert_2  = 34 + (72 << 16)
    fj_cell_closed_vert_3  = 34 + (71 << 16)
    fj_cell_closed_vert_4  = 33 + (70 << 16)
    fj_cell_closed_vert_5  = 32 + (69 << 16)
    fj_cell_closed_vert_6  = 32 + (68 << 16)
    fj_cell_closed_vert_7  = 33 + (69 << 16)
    fj_cell_closed_vert_8  = 34 + (70 << 16)
    STR_VAR
    fj_structure_type      = door
    fj_name                = Door10
    fj_door_wed_id         = DOOR10
  END

Example 6: add an animation to an area

  LPF fj_are_structure
    INT_VAR
    fj_loc_x       = 2785
    fj_loc_y       = 949
    fj_flags       = 0b00000000000000000001000110000101
    //visible, not illuminated, invisible in dark, covered by actors, shown in combat
    STR_VAR
    fj_structure_type = animation
    fj_name           = Cave1
    fj_bam_resref     = ag1100c1
  END

Example 7: delete all ambients from an area

  FOR( i = SHORT_AT 0x82 ; i ; --i )BEGIN
    LPF fj_are_structure
      INT_VAR fj_delete_mode = i - 1
      STR_VAR fj_structure_type = ambient
    END
  END

12.2  sc#addWmpAre

Adds an area to the worldmap. All variables are zero or blank by default unless otherwise indicated. This is an ACTION function.

An example best illustrates the use of this function.

// add links from these area(s) to the new area
ACTION_DEFINE_ASSOCIATIVE_ARRAY toNewArea BEGIN
  "AR0020" => "Exitwmp"       // City Gates
  "AR0300" => "Exitwmp"       // Docks
  "AR0400" => "Exitwmp"       // Slums
  "AR0500" => "Exitwmp"       // Bridge District
  "AR0700" => "Exitwmp"       // Waukeen's Promenade
  "AR0800" => "Exitwmp"       // Graveyard
  "AR0900" => "Exitwmp"       // Temple District
  "AR1000" => "Exitwmp"       // Government
  "AR1100" => "Exitwmp"       // Umar Hills
  "AR1300" => "Exitwmp"       // d'Arnise Keep
  "AR1304" => "Exitwmp"       // d'Arnise Keep
  "AR2000" => "Exitwmp"       // Trademeet
  "AR1200" => "Exitwmp"       // Windspear Hills
END

// add links from the new area to these area(s)
ACTION_DEFINE_ASSOCIATIVE_ARRAY fromNewArea BEGIN
  "AR0020" => "ExitNE"      // City Gates
  "AR0300" => "ExitN"       // Docks
  "AR0400" => "ExitN"       // Slums
  "AR0500" => "ExitNE"      // Bridge District
  "AR0700" => "ExitE"       // Waukeen's Promenade
  "AR0800" => "ExitS"       // Graveyard
  "AR0900" => "ExitNW"      // Temple District
  "AR1000" => "ExitN"       // Government
  "AR1100" => "ExitSE"      // Umar Hills
  "AR1300" => "ExitSE"      // d'Arnise Keep
  "AR1304" => "ExitSE"      // d'Arnise Keep
  "AR2000" => "ExitSW"      // Trademeet
  "AR1200" => "ExitW"       // Windspear Hills
END

// calls the function and returns the worldmap entry number for the new area
LAUNCH_ACTION_FUNCTION sc#addWmpAre
    INT_VAR mapIcon = 21           // map icon
            xCoord  = 240          // x coordinate
            yCoord  = 130          // y coordinate
            tTime   = 0            // travel time *4, so two means eight hours

    STR_VAR areName = "YS0390"     // area reference, like "AR0700"
            strName = "Govt. West" // area name, like "Waukeen's Promenade"
            strDesc = "Govt. West" // area description which will show up when hovering the area on the worldmap

END

13  Module Distribution: Setup-MyMod.exe

If you rename WeiDU.EXE to something of the form Setup-MyMod.exe, it will behave as if the following arguments were present:

13.1  Module Distribution Conventions

To distribute your mod, rename WeiDU.EXE to Setup-MyMod.EXE (or whatever), put Setup-MyMod.TP2 file in the same directory and go! Typically mods are distributed a ZIP files or self-extracting archives that put the EXE, TP2 and module data files in the main BGII directory.

If your mod adds new resources to the game (e.g., via COPY) you should be careful to pick a unique name so that you resource will not conflict with one created by another mod. For example (and I speak from personal experience here), naming a creature BOO2.CRE is just asking for trouble. One common approach here is to pick a special prefix that uses a character not found in normal game resources. For example, I might use the prefix W# and call a sword W#SWORD.ITM and a new spell W#SPELL.SPL. However, it it still possible to run into conflicts, so I recommend that you check out the Community Mod Filename Prefix Reservations project at http://forums.blackwyrmlair.net/index.php?showtopic=113 and register your own unique prefix.

13.2  WeiDU Return Values

The WeiDU.exe (or Setup-MyMod.exe) process will terminate with a “return value” (or “exit code” or “status code” or “error level”) based on the success or failure of certain operations. Depending on your operating system you can use this value to guide shell scripts or batch files that include WeiDU. In general, WeiDU returns 0 on success and non-zero on failure. Here is a concrete list of return values.

14  Regular Expressions

A regular expression or regexp is "somewhat" like a DOS wildcard but not quite. The big difference is that if you would say * in DOS you say .* in regexp-land. Here’s a definition:

The syntax for regular expressions is the same as in Gnu Emacs. The special characters are:

$^.*+?[]\

The following constructs are recognized:

   .      matches any character except newline
   *      (postfix) matches the previous expression zero, one or several times
   +      (postfix) matches the previous expression one or several times
   ?      (postfix) matches the previous expression once or not at all
   [..]   character set; ranges are denoted with -, as in [a-z];
          an initial ^, as in [^0-9], complements the set
   ^      matches at beginning of line
   $      matches at end of line
   \|     (infix) alternative between two expressions
   \(..\) grouping and naming of the enclosed expression
   \1     the text matched by the first \(...\) expression
          (\2 for the second expression, etc)
   \b     matches word boundaries
   \      quotes special characters.

So spe.* matches "sper01.itm" and "sper.eff" and "special".

Hopefully this is understandable to most people.

15  WeiDU constants

The following keywords can be used in values and evaluate to the given integer (usually an offset in a CRE file).

// KEYWORD VALUE
AREA_CITY 0252
AREA_DAY 0260
AREA_DUNGEON 0256
AREA_FOREST 0248
AREA_NIGHT 0264
ATTACK1 0220
ATTACK2 0224
ATTACK3 0228
ATTACK4 0232
BATTLE_CRY1 0200
BATTLE_CRY2 0204
BATTLE_CRY3 0208
BATTLE_CRY4 0212
BATTLE_CRY5 0216
BIO  0x1cc
BORED 0196
COMPLIMENT1 0352
COMPLIMENT2 0356
COMPLIMENT3 0360
CRITICAL_HIT 0424
CRITICAL_MISS 0428
DAMAGE 0236
DESC  0x54
DIALOGUE_DEFAULT 0412
DIALOGUE_HOSTILE 0408
DYING 0240
EXISTANCE1 0444
EXISTANCE2 0448
EXISTANCE3 0452
EXISTANCE4 0456
EXISTANCE5 0460
HAPPY 0172
HURT 0244
IDENTIFIED_DESC  0x54
INITIAL_MEETING 0164
INSULT 0340
INTERACTION1 0320
INTERACTION2 0324
INTERACTION3 0328
INTERACTION4 0332
INTERACTION5 0336
INVENTORY_FULL 0436
LEADER 0188
MISCELLANEOUS 0384
MORALE 0168
NAME1 8
NAME2 12
PICKED_POCKET 0440
REACT_TO_DIE_GENERAL 0376
REACT_TO_DIE_SPECIFIC 0380
RESPONSE_TO_COMPLIMENT2 0388
RESPONSE_TO_COMPLIMENT3 0392
RESPONSE_TO_INSULT1 0396
RESPONSE_TO_INSULT2 0400
RESPONSE_TO_INSULT3 0404
SELECT_ACTION1 0292
SELECT_ACTION2 0296
SELECT_ACTION3 0300
SELECT_ACTION4 0304
SELECT_ACTION5 0308
SELECT_ACTION6 0312
SELECT_ACTION7 0316
SELECT_COMMON1 0268
SELECT_COMMON2 0272
SELECT_COMMON3 0276
SELECT_COMMON4 0280
SELECT_COMMON5 0284
SELECT_COMMON6 0288
SELECT_RARE1 0416
SELECT_RARE2 0420
SPECIAL1 0364
SPECIAL2 0368
SPECIAL3 0372
TARGET_IMMUNE 0432
TIRED 0192
UNHAPPY_ANNOYED 0176
UNHAPPY_BREAKING 0184
UNHAPPY_SERIOUS 0180
UNIDENTIFIED_DESC 0080
HIDDEN_IN_SHADOWS 0444
SPELL_DISRUPTED 0448
SET_A_TRAP 0452
STORE_NAME 12

SCRIPT_OVERRIDE 0x248
SCRIPT_CLASS 0x250
SCRIPT_RACE 0x258
SCRIPT_GENERAL 0x260
SCRIPT_DEFAULT 0x268
DEATHVAR 0x280
DIALOG 0x2cc
AREA_SCRIPT 0x94

BIT0  0b00000000000000000000000000000001
BIT1  0b00000000000000000000000000000010
<snip>
BIT31 0b10000000000000000000000000000000

WNL "\r\n" // Windows new line
MNL "\r" // (pre-OSX) Macintosh new line
LNL "\n" // Linux/Unix/OSX new line
TAB "\t" // tabulation character

REGISTRY_BG1_PATH the path of BG1 (as read from the registry), or empty if not available.
REGISTRY_BG2_PATH ditto for BG2.
REGISTRY_PST_PATH ditto for PST.
REGISTRY_IWD1_PATH ditto for IWD1.
REGISTRY_IWD2_PATH ditto for IWD2.

USER_DIRECTORY evaluates to the directory in which user files are kept. This is the game path on non-EE-type games. On EE-type games, the USER_DIRECTORY variable is constructed from two parts, the user directory and a game-specific directory. If the file engine.lua exists, WeiDU will attempt to read the game-specific directory from it. If the engine.lua does not exist or does not contain the necessary information, WeiDU will use default paths. On Windows, the user directory is the user’s personal directory, as read from the Windows registry. On macOS, the user directory is "$HOME/Documents". On Linux, the user directory is "$HOME/.local/share". In both cases, $HOME is the user’s home directory, as read from the pwd database. The default game-specific path for BG: EE is "Baldur’s Gate - Enhanced Edition"; for BGII: EE it is "Baldur’s Gate II - Enhanced Edition"; for IWD: EE it is "Icewind Dale - Enhanced Edition"; and for PST: EE it is "Planescape Torment - Enhanced Edition".

SAVE_DIRECTORY evaluates to the directory in which the current game type stores its saved games. This is "%USER_DIRECTORY%/save".

MPSAVE_DIRECTORY evaluates to the directory in which the current game type stores its multiplayer saved games. The determination is done the same way as with the save directory, but for the directory mpsave instead.

EE_LANGUAGE evaluates to the Enhanced Edition language directory the user has selected, for example, en_US. This variable is undefined on non-EE games.

16  Common File Formats

This section briefly explains some common file formats. The definitive reference is http://gibberlings3.net/iesdp/.

17  The Source Code

The source code to WeiDU is available under the GNU General Public License, as detailed in the file COPYING. If for some reason you are unable to obtain a copy of the GPL, merely announce that fact on some public forum and your mailbox will be full of copies of it for life. It’s a great way to meet new people.

Since this is the world of Windows, I distribute a pre-compiled binary. WeiDU is written in OCaml, a functional programming language that includes automatic memory management, higher-order functions and efficient native code generation. If these terms mean nothing to you, you probably won’t be able to modify the source code.

Building WeiDU on Windows requires OCaml 4.01 or more recent, Cygwin and the elkhound program. The OCaml installer can install the required Cygwin packages. Building WeiGUI additionally requires OCaml-provided Tcl/Tk.

WeiDU can also be built on x86/x86-64 GNU/Linux and PPC OS X. The exact status on building WeiDU on x86/x86-64 OS X is not known, but there have been reports of success.

WeiDU uses a Make system that aims to correctly auto-configure itself, through the file Configuration.

WeiDU uses the GPL’d zlib and xdiff libraries, as well as portions from the GPL’d ocaml, batteries included library.

Elkhound is available as source code under a BSD licence and as pre-compiled x86 executables for Windows and GNU/Linux (built on Debian Squeeze).

For more information, please refer to the forum.

18  Special Thanks

Weimer’s thank you: I would like to thank the fine folks at the Infinity Engine File Format Hacking Project, without which this would not have been possible: http://gibberlings3.net/iesdp/.

In addition, I make heavy use of Near Infinity for general IE mods: http://www.idi.ntnu.no/~joh/ni/.

The Infinity Engine Editor Pro was very good at changing ITMs and SPLs, but DLTCEP is now a better choice: http://gibberlings3.net/tools/dltcep.php.

Kudos to my main out-of-house developer:

Special thanks to my main bug-finders *cough* I mean beta-testers:

Special thanks to Greg Henry for being the first person to mention WeiDU to me in a face-to-face conversation. I was quite impressed. Jason Compton is the first person to mention WeiDU to me in a telephone conversation. Scott McPeak is the first person to discuss my modding hobby with me in a face-to-face conversation (and he was quite well-informed).

The Bigg would additionally like to thank the following contributors:

and additionally

Wisp would like to extend further thanks to the following people:

and also The Bigg, for having developed and maintained BiggDU for many years and, while doing so, having significantly improved upon its workings and functionality.

19  Informal Copyright Notice

WeiDU was originally made by Westley Weimer. It was subsequently significantly improved upon in accordance with the GPL terms by Valerio Bigiani, AKA The Bigg, starting from version 186 (which was a closed beta, while the first public release was the 187 one). Starting from version 232 (version 231.06 to be more precise), maintenance and development was assumed by Fredrik Lindgren, a.k.a Wisp.

What this means is that all praise and credits should go to Weimer and Bigiani, but all bug reports and feature requests should go to Fredrik Lindgren (a.k.a Wisp).

Since WeiDU was released under the GPL, with an added notice that you are also allowed to distribute unmodified binaries, I assume the same holds true for mods distributed with this version of WeiDU. However, if you feel like being nice add a line in your readme stating that the current WeiDU may be downloaded from <insert link>. Current authorized mirrors include (but may not be limited to) all those from IEGMC, the Dragon’s Hoard Download Centre, and the SHS Download Centre.

20  Undocumented Features

Currently undocumented:

21  Index of Terms

Index

  • **, 9, 9

  • --append, 6
  • --args, 6
  • --args-list, 6
  • --args-rest, 6
  • --ask-every, 6
  • --autolog, 6
  • --automate, 6
  • --automate-min, 6
  • --backup, 6
  • --bcmp-from, 6
  • --bcmp-orig, 6
  • --bcmp-patch, 6
  • --bcmp-to, 6
  • --biff, 6
  • --biff-get, 6
  • --biff-get-list, 6
  • --biff-get-rest, 6
  • --biff-name, 6
  • --biff-str, 6
  • --biff-type, 6
  • --biff-value, 6
  • --biff-value-at, 6
  • --clear-memory, 6
  • --cmp-from, 6
  • --cmp-to, 6
  • --continue, 6
  • --dcmp-from, 6
  • --dcmp-to, 6
  • --debug-assign, 6
  • --debug-value, 6
  • --extract-kits, 6
  • --force-install, 6
  • --force-install-list, 6
  • --force-install-rest, 6
  • --force-uninstall, 6
  • --force-uninstall-list, 6
  • --force-uninstall-rest, 6
  • --forceify, 6
  • --ftlkin, 6
  • --ftlkout, 6
  • --full-from, 6
  • --game, 6
  • --game-by-type, 6
  • --language, 6
  • --list-biffs, 6
  • --list-files, 6
  • --log, 6
  • --logapp, 6
  • --make-biff, 6
  • --make-tlk, 6
  • --max, 6
  • --min, 6
  • --modder, 6
  • --no-auto-tp2, 6
  • --noautoupdate, 6
  • --nocom, 6
  • --nofrom, 6
  • --nogame, 6
  • --noheader, 6
  • --noselfupdatemsg, 6
  • --out, 6
  • --quick-menu, 6
  • --reinstall, 6
  • --remove-biff, 6
  • --safe-exit, 6
  • --save-components-name, 6
  • --script-style, 6
  • --search, 6
  • --skip-at-view, 6
  • --strapp, 6
  • --strfind, 6
  • --string, 6
  • --tcmp-from, 6
  • --tcmp-to, 6
  • --testtrans, 6
  • --text, 6
  • --tlkcmp-from, 6
  • --tlkcmp-to, 6
  • --tlkcmp-use-strings, 6
  • --tlkin, 6
  • --tlkmerge, 6
  • --tlkout, 6
  • --toplevel, 6
  • --traify, 6
  • --traify-old-tra, 6
  • --traify-tlk, 6
  • --trans, 6
  • --transin, 6
  • --transitive, 6, 7
  • --transref, 6
  • --uninstall, 6
  • --untraify-d, 6
  • --untraify-tra, 6
  • --update-all, 6
  • --use-lang, 6
  • --version, 6
  • --yes, 6

  • 2DA, 16

  • <, 9
  • <<, 9
  • <=, 9

  • =, 9
  • ==, 9

  • >, 9
  • >=, 9
  • >>, 9

  • ?, 9

  • &, 9
  • &&, 9
  • !=, 9
  • |, 9
  • ||, 9
  • `, 9
  • ADD_WORLDMAP_LINKS, 12
  • DELETE_WORLDMAP_LINKS, 12
  • DIRECTORY_OF_FILESPEC, 12
  • EXT_OF_FILESPEC, 12
  • FILE_OF_FILESPEC, 12
  • FIND_FREE_PVRZ_INDEX, 12
  • HANDLE_AUDIO, 12
  • HANDLE_CHARSETS, 12
  • HANDLE_TILESETS, 12
  • INSTALL_PVRZ, 12
  • RES_OF_FILESPEC, 12
  • UPDATE_PVRZ_INDICES, 12

  • ^^, 9

  • ABS, 9
  • ACTION_BASH_FOR, 9
  • ACTION_CLEAR_ARRAY, 9
  • ACTION_DEFINE_ARRAY, 9
  • ACTION_DEFINE_ASSOCIATIVE_ARRAY, 9
  • ACTION_FOR_EACH, 9
  • ACTION_GET_STRREF, 9
  • ACTION_GET_STRREF_F, 9
  • ACTION_GET_STRREF_FS, 9
  • ACTION_GET_STRREF_S, 9
  • ACTION_IF, 9
  • ACTION_INCLUDE, 9
  • ACTION_MATCH, 9
  • ACTION_PHP_EACH, 9
  • ACTION_READLN, 9
  • ACTION_REINCLUDE, 9
  • ACTION_RERAISE, 9
  • ACTION_TO_LOWER, 9
  • ACTION_TO_UPPER, 9
  • ACTION_TRY, 9
  • ADD_AREA_TYPE, 9
  • ADD_CRE_ITEM, 9, 10.12
  • ADD_GAM_NPC, 9, 10.6
  • ADD_JOURNAL, 9
  • ADD_KIT, 9
  • ADD_KNOWN_SPELL, 9
  • ADD_MAP_NOTE, 9
  • ADD_MEMORIZED_SPELL, 9
  • ADD_MUSIC, 9
  • ADD_PROJECTILE, 9
  • ADD_SCHOOL, 9
  • ADD_SECTYPE, 9
  • ADD_SPELL, 9
  • ADD_STATE_TRIGGER, 4
  • ADD_STORE_ITEM, 9, 10.5
  • ADD_TRANS_ACTION, 4
  • ADD_TRANS_TRIGGER, 4
  • ALLOW_MISSING, 9
  • ALTER_TLK, 9
  • ALTER_TLK_LIST, 9
  • ALTER_TLK_RANGE, 9
  • ALTER_TRANS, 4, 8.11
  • ALWAYS, 9
  • AND, 9
  • APPEND, 4, 9
  • APPEND_COL, 9
  • APPEND_COL_OUTER, 9
  • APPEND_EARLY, 4
  • APPEND_FILE, 9
  • APPEND_FILE_EVALUATE, 9
  • APPEND_OUTER, 9
  • APPENDI, 4
  • APPLY_BCS_PATCH, 9
  • APPLY_BCS_PATCH_OR_COPY, 9
  • ASK_EVERY_COMPONENT, 9
  • AT_EXIT, 9
  • AT_INTERACTIVE_EXIT, 9
  • AT_INTERACTIVE_NOW, 9
  • AT_INTERACTIVE_UNINSTALL, 9
  • AT_INTERACTIVE_UNINSTALL_EXIT, 9
  • AT_NOW, 9
  • AT_UNINSTALL, 9
  • AT_UNINSTALL_EXIT, 9
  • AUTHOR, 9
  • AUTO_EVAL_STRINGS, 9
  • AUTO_TRA, 9
  • array construct, 10.20

  • BACKUP, 9
  • BAF File, 5
  • BAND, 9
  • BASR, 9
  • BCS, 16
  • BEGIN, 4, 9
  • BIFF, 16
  • BIFF_IS_COMPRESSED, 9
  • BLSL, 9
  • BLSR, 9
  • BNOT, 9
  • BOR, 9
  • BUFFER_LENGTH, 9
  • BUT_ONLY, 9
  • BUT_ONLY_IF_IT_CHANGES, 9
  • BXOR, 9
  • BYTE_AT, 9

  • CASE_INSENSITIVE, 9
  • CASE_SENSITIVE, 9
  • CHAIN, 4
  • CHAIN2, 4
  • CLEAR_ARRAY, 9
  • CLEAR_ARRAYS, 9
  • CLEAR_CODES, 9
  • CLEAR_EVERYTHING, 9
  • CLEAR_IDS_MAP, 9
  • CLEAR_INLINED, 9
  • CLEAR_MEMORY, 9
  • COMPILE, 9
  • COMPILE_BAF_TO_BCS, 9
  • COMPILE_D_TO_DLG, 9
  • COMPONENT_NUMBER, 9
  • COMPRESS_INTO_FILE, 9
  • COMPRESS_INTO_VAR, 9
  • COMPRESS_REPLACE_FILE, 9
  • COPY, 9
  • COPY_ALL_GAM_FILES, 9
  • COPY_EXISTING, 9
  • COPY_EXISTING_REGEXP, 9
  • COPY_KIT, 9
  • COPY_LARGE, 9
  • COPY_RANDOM, 9
  • COPY_TRANS, 4
  • COPY_TRANS_LATE, 4
  • COUNT_2DA_COLS, 9
  • COUNT_2DA_ROWS, 9
  • COUNT_REGEXP_INSTANCES, 9
  • Code dumps, 11
  • Component, 9
  • Component Flag, 9
  • CREATE, 9
  • chainEpilogue, 4
  • chainText, 4
  • constant, 15

  • D Action, 4
  • D File, 4
  • DECOMPILE_AND_PATCH, 9
  • DECOMPILE_BCS_TO_BAF, 9
  • DECOMPILE_DLG_TO_D, 9
  • DECOMPRESS_BIFF, 9
  • DECOMPRESS_INTO_FILE, 9
  • DECOMPRESS_INTO_VAR, 9
  • DECOMPRESS_REPLACE_FILE, 9
  • DEFINE_ACTION_FUNCTION, 9
  • DEFINE_ACTION_MACRO, 9
  • DEFINE_ARRAY, 9
  • DEFINE_ASSOCIATIVE_ARRAY, 9
  • DEFINE_PATCH_FUNCTION, 9
  • DEFINE_PATCH_MACRO, 9
  • DELETE, 9
  • DELETE_BYTES, 9
  • DEPRECATED, 9
  • DESIGNATED, 9
  • DEST_DIRECTORY, 9
  • DEST_EXT, 9
  • DEST_FILE, 9
  • DEST_FILESPEC, 9
  • DEST_RES, 9
  • DIRECTORY_EXISTS, 9
  • DISABLE_FROM_KEY, 9
  • DLG, 3
  • DO, 4
  • dActionWhen, 4
  • directory-file-regexp, 9

  • EDIT_SAV_FILE, 9
  • EFF, 16
  • ENGINE_IS, 9
  • EVAL, 9
  • EVALUATE_BUFFER, 9, 9
  • EVALUATE_BUFFER_SPECIAL, 9
  • EVALUATE_REGEXP, 9
  • EXACT_MATCH, 9
  • EXIT, 4
  • EXTEND_BOTTOM, 4, 9
  • EXTEND_BOTTOM_REGEXP, 9
  • EXTEND_TOP, 4, 9
  • EXTEND_TOP_REGEXP, 9
  • EXTERN, 4

  • FAIL, 9
  • FILE_CONTAINS, 9
  • FILE_CONTAINS_EVALUATED, 9
  • FILE_EXISTS, 9
  • FILE_EXISTS_IN_GAME, 9
  • FILE_IS_IN_COMPRESSED_BIFF, 9
  • FILE_MD5, 9
  • FILE_SIZE, 9
  • FLAGS, 4
  • FOR, 9
  • FORBID_COMPONENT, 9
  • FORBID_FILE, 9
  • FORCED_SUBCOMPONENT, 9
  • Forced String Reference, 4
  • Functions, 10.23
  • fj_are_structure, 12.1

  • GAME_INCLUDES, 9
  • GAME_IS, 9
  • GET_DIRECTORY_ARRAY, 9
  • GET_FILE_ARRAY, 9
  • GET_OFFSET_ARRAY, 9
  • GET_OFFSET_ARRAY and GET_OFFSET_ARRAY2, 10.24
  • GET_OFFSET_ARRAY2, 9
  • GET_STRREF, 9
  • GET_STRREF_F, 9
  • GET_STRREF_FS, 9
  • GET_STRREF_S, 9
  • GLOB, 9
  • GOTO, 4
  • GROUP, 9, 10.19

  • HANDLE_AUDIO and HANDLE_TILESETS, 10.27

  • I_S_I, 9
  • ID_OF_LABEL, 9
  • IDS_OF_SYMBOL, 9
  • IF, 4, 9
  • IF_EXISTS, 9
  • IF_SIZE_IS, 9
  • INCLUDE, 9
  • INDEX, 9
  • INDEX_BUFFER, 9
  • INNER_ACTION, 9, 10.14
  • INNER_PATCH, 9
  • INNER_PATCH_FILE, 9
  • INNER_PATCH_SAVE, 9
  • INSERT_2DA_ROW, 9
  • INSERT_BYTES, 9
  • INSERT_FILE, 9
  • INSTALL_BY_DEFAULT, 9
  • INSTALL_ORDER, 9, 9
  • INTERACTIVE, 9
  • INTERJECT, 4
  • INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS, 4, 8.5
  • INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS2, 4, 8.6
  • INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS3, 4
  • INTERJECT_COPY_TRANS4, 4
  • Infinity Engine action, 5
  • Infinity Engine object, 5
  • Infinity Engine trigger, 5
  • IS_AN_INT, 9
  • IS_SILENT, 9
  • ITM, 16
  • inlined, 9

  • JOURNAL, 4

  • KEY, 16

  • LABEL, 9
  • LAF, 9
  • LAM, 9
  • LANGUAGE, 9
  • LAUNCH_ACTION_FUNCTION, 9
  • LAUNCH_ACTION_MACRO, 9
  • LAUNCH_PATCH_FUNCTION, 9
  • LAUNCH_PATCH_MACRO, 9
  • Language, 9
  • LOAD_TRA, 9
  • LOG, 9
  • LONG_AT, 9
  • LOOKUP_IDS_SYMBOL_OF_INT, 9
  • LPF, 9
  • LPM, 9

  • MAKE_BIFF, 9
  • MATCH and TRY, 10.25
  • Macros Listing, 12
  • MKDIR, 9
  • MOD_FOLDER, 9
  • MOD_IS_INSTALLED, 9
  • MODDER, 9, 10.21
  • MODULO, 9
  • MOVE, 9
  • Module Distribution, 13
  • macros, 10.17

  • NEXT_STRREF, 9
  • NO_IF_EVAL_BUG, 9
  • NO_LOG_RECORD, 9
  • NOGLOB, 9
  • NOT, 9
  • nonPausing, 4

  • OR, 9
  • OUTER_FOR, 9
  • OUTER_INNER_PATCH, 9
  • OUTER_INNER_PATCH_SAVE, 9
  • OUTER_PATCH, 9
  • OUTER_PATCH_SAVE, 9
  • OUTER_SET, 9
  • OUTER_SPRINT, 9
  • OUTER_TEXT_SPRINT, 9
  • OUTER_WHILE, 9
  • offset, 9
  • optcase, 9
  • optexact, 9
  • optGlob, 9
  • optNoBackup, 9

  • PATCH_BASH_FOR, 9
  • PATCH_CLEAR_ARRAY, 9
  • PATCH_DEFINE_ARRAY, 9
  • PATCH_DEFINE_ASSOCIATIVE_ARRAY, 9
  • PATCH_FAIL, 9
  • PATCH_FOR_EACH, 9
  • PATCH_IF, 9
  • PATCH_INCLUDE, 9
  • PATCH_LOG, 9
  • PATCH_MATCH, 9
  • PATCH_PHP_EACH, 9
  • PATCH_PRINT, 9
  • PATCH_RANDOM_SEED, 9
  • PATCH_READLN, 9
  • PATCH_REINCLUDE, 9
  • PATCH_RERAISE, 9
  • PATCH_SILENT, 9
  • PATCH_TRY, 9
  • PATCH_VERBOSE, 9
  • PATCH_WARN, 9
  • PATCH_WITH_SCOPE, 9
  • PATCH_WITH_TRA, 9
  • PHP_EACH, 9
  • PRETTY_PRINT_2DA, 9, 9
  • PRINT, 9
  • Prompt Customization, 10.13
  • patch, 9
  • prompts.tra, 10.13

  • QUICK_MENU, 9, 10.26
  • QUOTE, 9

  • R_A_T_P_R, 4
  • R_B_B, 9
  • RANDOM, 9
  • RANDOM_SEED, 9
  • READ_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW, 9
  • READ_2DA_ENTRY, 9
  • READ_2DA_ENTRY_FORMER, 9
  • READ_ASCII, 9
  • READ_BYTE, 9
  • READ_LONG, 9
  • READ_SBYTE, 9
  • READ_SHORT, 9
  • READ_SLONG, 9
  • READ_SSHORT, 9
  • READ_STRREF, 9
  • READ_STRREF_F, 9
  • READ_STRREF_FS, 9
  • READ_STRREF_S, 9
  • READLN, 10.22
  • README, 9
  • REFACTOR_BAF_TRIGGER, 9
  • REFACTOR_D_TRIGGER, 9
  • REFACTOR_TRIGGER, 9
  • REINCLUDE, 9
  • REMOVE_2DA_ROW, 9
  • REMOVE_CRE_EFFECTS, 9
  • REMOVE_CRE_ITEM, 9
  • REMOVE_CRE_ITEMS, 9
  • REMOVE_KNOWN_SPELL, 9
  • REMOVE_KNOWN_SPELLS, 9
  • REMOVE_MEMORIZED_SPELL, 9
  • REMOVE_MEMORIZED_SPELLS, 9
  • REMOVE_STORE_ITEM, 9
  • REPLACE, 4, 9
  • REPLACE_ACTION_TEXT, 4
  • REPLACE_ACTION_TEXT_PROCESS, 4
  • REPLACE_ACTION_TEXT_REGEXP, 4
  • REPLACE_BCS_BLOCK, 9
  • REPLACE_CRE_ITEM, 9
  • REPLACE_EVALUATE, 9
  • REPLACE_SAY, 4
  • REPLACE_STATE_TRIGGER, 4
  • REPLACE_TEXTUALLY, 9
  • REPLACE_TRANS_ACTION, 4
  • REPLACE_TRANS_TRIGGER, 4
  • REPLACE_TRIGGER_TEXT, 4
  • REPLACE_TRIGGER_TEXT_REGEXP, 4
  • REPLY, 4
  • REQUIRE_COMPONENT, 9
  • REQUIRE_FILE, 9
  • REQUIRE_PREDICATE, 9
  • RESOLVE_STR_REF, 9
  • RINDEX, 9
  • RINDEX_BUFFER, 9
  • reference, 4
  • regexp, 14
  • replyText, 4

  • SAY, 4, 9
  • SAY_EVALUATED, 9
  • SBYTE_AT, 9
  • SCRIPT_STYLE, 9
  • SET, 9
  • SET_2DA_ENTRIES_NOW, 9
  • SET_2DA_ENTRY, 9
  • SET_2DA_ENTRY_LATER, 9
  • SET_BG2_PROFICIENCY, 9
  • SET_WEIGHT, 4
  • SHORT_AT, 9
  • SILENT, 9
  • SIZE_OF_FILE, 9
  • SLONG_AT, 9
  • SNPRINT, 9
  • SOLVED_JOURNAL, 4
  • SOURCE_BIFF, 9
  • SOURCE_DIRECTORY, 9
  • SOURCE_EXT, 9
  • SOURCE_FILE, 9
  • SOURCE_FILESPEC, 9
  • SOURCE_RES, 9
  • SOURCE_SIZE, 9
  • SPACES, 9
  • SPL, 16
  • SPRINT, 9
  • Special Thanks, 18
  • SSHORT_AT, 9
  • STATE_WHICH_SAYS, 9, 9
  • STR_CMP, 9
  • STR_EQ, 9
  • STRING_COMPARE, 9
  • STRING_COMPARE_CASE, 9
  • STRING_COMPARE_REGEXP, 9
  • STRING_CONTAINS_REGEXP, 9
  • STRING_EQUAL, 9
  • STRING_EQUAL_CASE, 9
  • STRING_LENGTH, 9
  • STRING_MATCHES_REGEXP, 9
  • STRING_SET, 9
  • STRING_SET_EVALUATE, 9
  • STRING_SET_RANGE, 9
  • String, 4
  • SUBCOMPONENT, 9, 10.11
  • sayText, 4
  • sc#addWmpAre, 12.2
  • script block, 5
  • script response, 5
  • script trigger, 5
  • state, 4
  • stateActionString, 4
  • stateLabel, 4
  • stateNumber, 4
  • stateTriggerString, 4

  • TEXT_SPRINT, 9
  • TLK, 16
  • TO_LOWER, 9
  • TO_UPPER, 9
  • TP2, 9
  • TP2 Action, 9
  • TP2 File, 9
  • TP2 Flag, 9
  • TP2_AUTHOR, 9
  • TP2_BASE_NAME, 9
  • TP2_FILE_NAME, 9
  • TRA, 8.8
  • TRA_ENTRY_EXISTS, 9
  • text, 4
  • transFeature, 4
  • transition, 4
  • transNext, 4
  • transTriggerString, 4

  • UNINSTALL, 9
  • UNINSTALL_ORDER, 9
  • UNLESS, 4, 9
  • UNSOLVED_JOURNAL, 4
  • USING, 9

  • VARIABLE_IS_SET, 9
  • VERBOSE, 9
  • VERSION, 9
  • value, 9
  • variable, 9

  • WARN, 9
  • WEIDU_ARCH, 9
  • WEIDU_OS, 9
  • WEIGHT, 4
  • WHILE, 9, 10.8
  • WITH_SCOPE, 9
  • WITH_TRA, 9
  • WRITE_ASCII, 9
  • WRITE_ASCII_LIST, 9
  • WRITE_ASCII_TERMINATE, 9
  • WRITE_ASCIIE, 9
  • WRITE_ASCIIL, 9
  • WRITE_ASCIIT, 9
  • WRITE_BYTE, 9
  • WRITE_EVALUATED_ASCII, 9
  • WRITE_FILE, 9
  • WRITE_LONG, 9
  • WRITE_SHORT, 9
  • when, 9

22  Changes

See the file README-WeiDU-Changes.txt for a description of how WeiDU has changed over time.


This document was translated from LATEX by HEVEA.